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Old May 25th, 2012, 06:20 AM   #1
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Killed Pots


Some of the most beautiful ceramic art was done by several groups of desert dwelling Native Americans. The finest were used as grave goods. But finding an undamaged one is almost impossible. Almost all of these pots were ceremonially "killed" by putting a hole in the bottom. These were never used by the living and killing them ment that they never could be.
Pots weren't the only ceramic item that was killed. In meso America small red clay sculptures were broken and buried in fields as offerings to the spirits. Why were whole ones not used?
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Old May 25th, 2012, 01:04 PM   #2
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Some of the most beautiful ceramic art was done by several groups of desert dwelling Native Americans. The finest were used as grave goods. But finding an undamaged one is almost impossible. Almost all of these pots were ceremonially "killed" by putting a hole in the bottom. These were never used by the living and killing them ment that they never could be.
Pots weren't the only ceramic item that was killed. In meso America small red clay sculptures were broken and buried in fields as offerings to the spirits. Why were whole ones not used?
Some tribes did the same with beautifully knapped projectile points that were never made for hunting.
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Old May 25th, 2012, 01:52 PM   #3

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Some tribes did the same with beautifully knapped projectile points that were never made for hunting.
The Olmec and Maya did something similar with ceremonial axe heads that were buried at temple sites in a North-South alignment for a type of consecration.

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Old May 26th, 2012, 07:39 AM   #4

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I might have to look it up later to make sure (I know I have at least one book explaining this) but the Maya ritually killed their pots to release the "k'uh" in them. K'uh is a Mayan term referring to the holy/sacred/spiritual energy that flows in all things, I can't really think of a similar term in English though. But all things had k'uh in varying amounts, and k'uh brought life. In Maya cosmology you see there was absolutely no distinction between the spiritual world and the natural world. So yeah, to offer up pots and stuff to the ancestors, spirits, or gods they had to first "kill" them.
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Old May 26th, 2012, 08:40 AM   #5
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The Olmec and Maya did something similar with ceremonial axe heads that were buried at temple sites in a North-South alignment for a type of consecration.

Click the image to open in full size.
About 15 years ago at the Fisherville (Virginia) antique show I had the chance to buy some of these in the most lovely translucent green jade. But, because of other things being sold that day, (a Native American trophy that looked like a cross between a drum and a dream catcher made with a bird skull and many human molars - with paperwork) I felt it was better to leave that stuff alone. I didn't know what sort of spirits were roaming around the grounds that day.
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Old May 26th, 2012, 09:01 AM   #6
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Early American artist George Catlin painted this while visiting the Comanches.

Warriors sacrificing their arrows by shooting them at Medicine Rock.

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Old May 26th, 2012, 09:19 AM   #7

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Originally Posted by Hresvelgr View Post
I might have to look it up later to make sure (I know I have at least one book explaining this) but the Maya ritually killed their pots to release the "k'uh" in them. K'uh is a Mayan term referring to the holy/sacred/spiritual energy that flows in all things, I can't really think of a similar term in English though. But all things had k'uh in varying amounts, and k'uh brought life. In Maya cosmology you see there was absolutely no distinction between the spiritual world and the natural world. So yeah, to offer up pots and stuff to the ancestors, spirits, or gods they had to first "kill" them.
Interesting point about the pots having to be klled , one of the gnostc gospels i was reading a while back , was saying that it was always Jesus plan to be killed , because he had to be born in a material body , and then leave that body after death , as it was the only way to reach the underworld of Hades,
So it was not his life here that was the important part for mankind , but that Satan and Hades had taken over the underworld , and once a spirit of a human had left the body , that was where instead of the spirit being judged or weighed or whatever and then sent on its way , Hades was imprisoning our spirits/souls for any minor sins, and not letting any return to God , or move on.
According to this book , Jesus destroyed Hades and Satans realm in the underworld , and it was this action that saved mankinds souls, and therefore the saying that Jesus died for our Salvation .
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Old May 26th, 2012, 09:43 AM   #8

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntress View Post
About 15 years ago at the Fisherville (Virginia) antique show I had the chance to buy some of these in the most lovely translucent green jade. But, because of other things being sold that day, (a Native American trophy that looked like a cross between a drum and a dream catcher made with a bird skull and many human molars - with paperwork) I felt it was better to leave that stuff alone. I didn't know what sort of spirits were roaming around the grounds that day.
Huntress, if you haven't already heard of these, you might be interested:

Jaina Island is a pre-Columbian Maya archaeological site in the present-day Mexican state of Campeche. A small limestone island on the Yucatán Peninsula's Gulf coast with only a tidal inlet separating it from the mainland, Jaina served as an elite Maya burial site, and is notable for the high number of fine ceramic figurines excavated there.

Jaina Island's notability is tied to its estimated 20,000 graves, of which over 1,000 have been archaeologically excavated.[5] Within each grave, the human remains are accompanied by glassware, slateware, or pottery as well as one or more ceramic figurines, usually resting on the occupant's chest or held in their hands.

[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaina_Island]Jaina Island - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

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MIKE RUGGERI'S MAYA WORLD
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Old May 26th, 2012, 10:41 AM   #9

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More about the figurines:

What is unusual about the Jaina burials is the astonishing artistry and beauty of the small figurines clutched in the hands of the dead. These tiny statues, only a few inches tall, capture intimate glimpses of upper class Mayan life and styles in clay still showing traces of the vivid colors with which they were painted. Some are hollow with clay pellets that rattle; others have holes and serve as whistles or ocarinas. Surprisingly, none have been ritually ‘killed’ by breaking or piercing as was usual with votive offerings.
Bodies are often stylized but the faces, surely portraits, are modeled in loving detail down to the faint smile of a lady, the haughty sneer of a priest or the menacing scowl of a warrior. Costumes are elaborate and represented with the same fidelity.
According to Diego de Landa, who recorded many details of Maya life soon after the Conquest, producing these masterpieces seems to have been an act of penance. The artists were isolated and required to fast, exercise strict continence and undergo rigorous religious rituals until the job was done. Otherwise, the work was considered unclean and of evil omen.

jaina figurings - Bing Images
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Old May 26th, 2012, 12:08 PM   #10

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Originally Posted by unclefred View Post
More about the figurines:

What is unusual about the Jaina burials is the astonishing artistry and beauty of the small figurines clutched in the hands of the dead. These tiny statues, only a few inches tall, capture intimate glimpses of upper class Mayan life and styles in clay still showing traces of the vivid colors with which they were painted. Some are hollow with clay pellets that rattle; others have holes and serve as whistles or ocarinas. Surprisingly, none have been ritually ‘killed’ by breaking or piercing as was usual with votive offerings.
Bodies are often stylized but the faces, surely portraits, are modeled in loving detail down to the faint smile of a lady, the haughty sneer of a priest or the menacing scowl of a warrior. Costumes are elaborate and represented with the same fidelity.
According to Diego de Landa, who recorded many details of Maya life soon after the Conquest, producing these masterpieces seems to have been an act of penance. The artists were isolated and required to fast, exercise strict continence and undergo rigorous religious rituals until the job was done. Otherwise, the work was considered unclean and of evil omen.

jaina figurings - Bing Images
She could be seen as an indian from India Uncle Fred looking at her features and hairstyle and bracelets and the third eye jewel, the name of the island being Jaina , as in the Jains is suggestive too .
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