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Old November 16th, 2012, 01:53 AM   #31

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..... The Jimmy Saville case has been all over the news with its embarrassing dark and pedophile cases. It beggars beyond belief ............
Buggers beyond belief, surely?
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Old November 16th, 2012, 01:54 PM   #32

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Sorry, i thought you knew what i had meant about the great divide in the country. Of course it is too political to delve into here.
Oh, then what you were referring to was merely politics? I thought it may have been something else of a more personal and substantial nature because of your references to families, friends, lovers, etc., being divided.

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Yes, i knew it was pretty bad then, but luckily for them, they weren't bombarded by television and radio.
Folks tend to tune out the incessant political ads during an election season. Once the same ad has been aired for the umpteenth time, it gets a little old.

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The thing is, our culture and entertainment is fully politicized...
Quite the opposite. You've never watched Dancing With the Stars? What's political about all the detective/police shows, the reality shows, the comedies, the movies? I didn't see anything political in those Spider-Man movies I liked.

Entertainment is no more nor less than what it is ... entertainment. Same goes for sports.

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I call it the subtle promotion of negative partisanship...The thing is, quite a few people are stuck in the 50's and 60's, still beating a long since gone dead horse.
Unfortunately, this is where I'm not sure what you're talking about. Are you still talking about politics?

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So, do you believe turn about is fair play?
No. What I'm saying is if one accuses another of not being able to think, of being easily manipulated by "mass media" just because he may have different beliefs or opinions, well may the latter say the same of the former. What's good for the goose is good for the gander. The fact is, the US is the most pluralist society in the world. The US is filled with persons of a wide variety of beliefs and opinions from all over the world. We are and continue to be an immigrant nation. But despite what may be vast differences in beliefs, the one thing that unites everybody is a written document. A supposedly hypnotic or all-powerful "mass media" is no match for that.

Under the umbrella of a nation created by some sheets of paper are housed a vast variety of subcultures which, for the most part, get along just fine with each other. It's not a house divided. And under this umbrella is where real life occurs. And folks tend to be adept at dismissing the superficialities. People do have common sense and P.T. Barnum had a wise observation in this regard. To claim that folks are easily manipulated by a "mass media" - especially in our pluralist and free society - is elitist. The one who makes that sort of claim is claiming he knows better than everyone else, or at least those who have different opinions or beliefs. It's a slippery slope toward favoring the establishment of an elite bureaucracy which "knows better" than the "rabble."

Even in closed societies where governments make it a specific function to control people through propaganda, the attempt mostly fails. Perhaps the top example is the old USSR. It's very much like what P.T. Barnum said. Such a thing as common sense does exist, and most people tend to have it. And if that was the situation in a closed society, how much more true is it of an open, pluralist society? To claim otherwise is to sell people short merely because they may have different opinions or beliefs.

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Instead, i will start saying that the other half of the country stopped laughing together when they noticed favoritism & preferential treatment had taken over.
Since when did the country stop laughing together? Even in the old monochrome eras when many groups were outsiders, everyone still wanted to go to the movies.

Massive and necessary civil service reforms were enacted in the wake of President Garfield's assassination in 1881. Prior to those reforms, preferential treatment and patronage was a problem in the US. There was also a massive amount of prejuidice against non-whites. Jim Crow would dominate as the once-dead KKK would come back to life.

In the majority of things, the US is much, much better now than in the past. In this regard, these are "the good old days."
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Old November 16th, 2012, 03:09 PM   #33

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Hi BD, how are you? Our paths haven't crossed in quite awhile, have they? Well, I've still got some time to kill before the 7 p.m. Gordon Ramsey US show comes on TV. (I actually find his shows becoming a bit tiresome as it's the same thing over and over. But it's just entertainment.)

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Mass media dictates, through sheer repetition and by its ubiquitous nature, just about everything the average person eats, thinks, does, believes and buys.
What a depressing outlook. Korean tacos is an item that has become popular in the US, having spread across the country from the west (left) coast. Never once have I ever seen a Korean taco advertised on TV, nor listed on a McDonald's menu. But this is one item that has spread in popularity across the country.

I don't know what it's like everywhere in the UK, but average folks here tend to do the things they like to do. And eat the things they like to eat, buy the things they want, etc. Within a 45-minutes drive from my home are restaurants from Thai, African and German cuisine to everything in between. How the heck do all these places stay in business? None of them are ever advertised in "mass media." There's also an English Tea Room downtown which also sells furniture. It's a furniture store with an adjoining restaurant.

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To become aware of this this is to essentially become an non-conformist in every way.
Aware of what? What you claimed? There's more to life than what you see on TV or read in the newspaper. Most folks know this.

To be a non-conformist for the sake of being a non-conformist is inevitably an exercise in ego. It's a claim that one knows better than the supposed average person. Well, what is the average person? Perhaps this may be an easier question to answer in your "neck of the woods" than it is here.

I challenge anyone to attempt to describe an average US citizen.

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I DON'T eat what they say, listen to what they say, vote for what they want or believe what I see and read about in the mainstream.
I'm sure the majority of UK citizens are the same way. Unless your candidates who stand for office receive +90% of the vote, as candidates in the old Eastern bloc were accustomed to receiving.

BD, you sell short your fellow UK citizens.

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Demonoid and Oink did nothing, technically, illegal. A .torrent file is small file which connects to a tracker which then downloads a file (admittedly, usually an illegally shared file)...
Ahem. Take another look at what you posted.

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But the power of greedy corporations who refuse to take advantage of the 21st century market...
Hey, either they have or they haven't. Which is it? And if they haven't, so much for the influence of corporate-owned "mass media."

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And if they have, the rest of the vested interests and ruling classes have. Be warned!
I read a better phrase written by Karl Marx. Hey, someone should have told Goldberg it's against the law to shoot people.

Hey, you are an example of exactly what I've been saying. When some folks assume they know better than the "average" citizen, they become elitist. And elitists have a habit of considering themselves above the "rabble." Is something illegal? Well, it's just a technicality or admittedly an illegally shared file. The rabble should follow the law, but an elitist is above the law. It's OK for an elitist to engage in political assassination, after all, the elitist knows better and is above the rabble of average citizens, of whom the vast majority are law-abiding citizens and would never do such a thing. The elitist accords special privileges and knowledge to himself, and absolves himself of possible transgressions which only the rabble or averages citizens must abide.

Gosh! There are people, perhaps a majority, who don't believe or have the opinions they should have, namely the same as the elitist, why! they must be mindless denizens of "mass media."

Hmm. Such an attitude to have, BD. Hey, that reminds me. I think I'll cook up a bunch of cabbage rolls for the household this weekend. I don't know why, I just have a taste for them. Can't remember the last time I saw cabbage rolls advertised in "mass media."
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