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-   -   Most interesting artist from your country (http://historum.com/art-cultural-history/62931-most-interesting-artist-your-country.html)

antonina November 24th, 2013 06:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Raminus Polus (Post 1650751)
Alexander Rodchenko, a cult figure in Soviet avant garde of 1920s, one of the founder of constuctivism . Was married to Varvara Stepanova, the artist, painter and fashion designer.

Thank you for the fascinating contribution, I'm familiar with Rodchenko of course.

To tell you the truth, it's simply impossible for me to separate his work from the horrific realities of the period. I never look at a Rodchenko photo or poster without simultaneously imagining massacres, famine and millions of bezprizornyje.

Artists eagerly offering their talent to a totalitarian regime are always a depressing sight. Especially in case of highly gifted artists - such as Rodchenko.

Artistically...

You're right, Rodchenko posters were groundbreaking. Even if dadaism and futurism preceded him, he assembled and reinterpreted elements of those movements in a daring and incredibly inspirational way.

Actually, I always use Rodchenko to teach poster design.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Raminus Polus (Post 1650751)

Additional thanks for this, I never came across his wife's work.

antonina November 24th, 2013 06:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fireatwill (Post 1651456)
Even the small size online samples of his work simply pops out of the screen.

Yes, I've never seen the originals but he was daring with the brush - and lived in a land of great outdoors. It's sad his life was short.

antonina November 24th, 2013 07:06 AM

This Polish painter was also into snow. Ukrainian and Belarusian landscapes this time, and the favourite pasttime of our ancestors:


Julian Fałat (1853 -1929)

http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/F...dzwiedziem.jpg

http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/F..._na_niedzw.jpg

Linschoten November 24th, 2013 08:03 AM

I like the sunlight on the snow in the first; shame about the bear though!

antonina November 24th, 2013 08:06 AM

These artists were influenced by WW2 and Nazi occupation experience:

http://art.blox.pl/resource/wroblewski1.jpg

http://artyzm.com/obrazy/wroblewski-...lanie-VIII.jpg

Andrzej Wróblewski (b.1927 in Vilnus- 1957)

http://polinst.hu/sites/default/file...o_szajna11.jpg

http://multimedia.szajna.eu/files/im...an_1971-72.jpg

http://expresskaszubski.pl/pictures/.../szajna-on.jpg

http://d.wiadomosci24.pl/g2/0a/29/bf...54_b88f_p.jpeg

Józef Szajna (1922-2008)

Home Army soldier, prisoner of Aushwitz and Buchenwald.The assemblage sculptures were used in his incredible spectacle "Replika" (Response) based on the camp exerience.

multimedia szajna festival :: Szajna Galeria

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/i...UEJVbufoc7Sv0h

http://www.culture.pl/image/image_ga...=1316418908287

http://bi.gazeta.pl/im/28/e1/c0/z126...apocznikow.jpg

Alina Szapocznikow (1926 -1973) This artist too was concentration camp prisoner.

Alina Szapocznikow: Sculpture Undone, 1955?1972 ? review | Art and design | theguardian.com

http://news.o.pl/wp-content/i/2009/0...tor.jpg?9d7bd4

http://img.interia.pl/wiadomosci/nim...sa_2805388.jpg

Tadeusz Kantor (1915 -1990)

Tadeusz Kantor | Culture.pl

I'd be interested to see some artists from your countries who dealt with the same topic.

antonina November 24th, 2013 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Linschoten (Post 1651561)
I like the sunlight on the snow in the first; shame about the bear though!

Yes, that's a part of the Kresy heritage I definitely disassociate myself from. Among the handful of stuff I inherited is my great-great-grandma's cookery book with plenty of venison recipes (deer, bear, boar and birds I've never even heard of) Ugh! :sick:

Isleifson November 24th, 2013 10:37 AM

Most famous art work from Lorraine.


CAOA Meuse - [Actualité du patrimoine mobilier meusien]

Raminus Polus November 24th, 2013 12:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by antonina (Post 1651483)
Thank you for the fascinating contribution, I'm familiar with Rodchenko of course.
A

Thank you. Yes, post civil war time was a trial. Artists of that time were romantics, innovators and boundary-breakers. Rodchenko, Malevich, «futuristy» with Mayakovky and many others. I don't think that time was so unbearably horrific, or more correct: it was for those who shares new ideals. If I lived by then, I could never be agree with Maykovsky and Rodchenko as with «obsolete art» or with relation to «old world» or religion. However, what they did was highly talented type of art beyond politics.


Speaking of Russian avant garde of 1920s I should mention other artist of that epoch, Vassily Kandinsky (1866 –1944)


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Kandinsky.jpeg

Painting was just his hobby till the age of 30, then it overgrew into a passion. He refused professorship of Roman Law in University of Tartu, then arrived in Munich where became to study Вauhaus art.


Works performed by Kandinsky are rather hard to classify correct. Formally, it is an «abstract art». But if it so, then with a solid part of cubism, constructivism, impressionism, expressionism and «visual art» . In a word, it is an "eclectic abstract art".


Kandinsky was also a great art theorist. In other avant garde streams, I can would compare what he did (may be involuntary) with Iannis Xenakis in music. Probably that's why any time I see Kandinsky’s paintings I hear music of Xenakis in my head.



http://www.fertomniavirtus.com/wp-co...gg_0910_25.jpg


On White II
1923; Oil on canvas, 105 x 98cm; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth...n-white-II.jpg

Composition VIII
1923 (140 Kb); Oil on canvas, 140 x 201 cm (55 1/8 x 79 1/8 in); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth...sky.comp-8.jpg

Black and Violet
1923
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth...ack-violet.jpg

Yellow, Red, Blue
1925; Oil on canvas, 127x200cm; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth...w-red-blue.jpg

Mr. Rhombus November 24th, 2013 01:42 PM

The most interesting artist from my country, the US, is the master carver Ernest "Mooney" Carver from Ohio. Primarily a knife-maker, he carved wood as a hobby, but what he was able to do was simply amazing. He was untrained in carving, and yet was able to do this, a replica of President Lincoln's funeral train:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-58ml6X48Ys...-36-39_414.JPG

He also carved a series of model trains depicting the history of the steam engine, including this early engine:

http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/Re...?sn=IIWARTHER7

And this late one:

http://blog.woodcraft.com/wp-content...5-1024x578.jpg

He was also, if I remember correctly, reputed to be able to cut a working pair of pliers from a small piece of wood using only nine cuts, and using 511 of these pliers, he made this "tree" of interconnected pliers:

http://www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com/i...therPliers.JPG

As far as I know, the only museum that houses his work is located in Dover, Ohio.

Mr. Rhombus November 24th, 2013 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by antonina (Post 1651568)
Yes, that's a part of the Kresy heritage I definitely disassociate myself from. Among the handful of stuff I inherited is my great-great-grandma's cookery book with plenty of venison recipes (deer, bear, boar and birds I've never even heard of) Ugh! :sick:

My grandmother comes from near Czarnków (she was German, however) in western Poland, and she has many recipes for venison as well. She can work wonders with it, and I personally love that sort of meat.


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