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-   -   Most interesting artist from your country (http://historum.com/art-cultural-history/62931-most-interesting-artist-your-country.html)

The Gushel November 26th, 2013 01:26 PM

Like, :)

Gushel.

Fireatwill November 26th, 2013 01:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by antonina (Post 1653586)
I detest Beksiński myself, even though he's probably the best selling modern Polish artist nowadays. First of all, anyone delving in such stuff for a prolonged period of time (not to mention a lifetime) is looking for trouble. Secondly, the horror is boringly literal. Compare it with eg. Goya - there's a small painting called "The Maypole", nothing particular happening there, group of peasants at a fair under low hanging sky - but there's something so menacing about the innocent scene you can't get over it for months.

Interesting you mentioned Goya, because Goya painted the horrors of war long before war photography. Today most of the horrific images are in the form of photos and video, which makes them even more compelling.

antonina November 26th, 2013 01:48 PM

Some nicer Polish painter at this late hour is a must.

Jan Stanisławski (1860 -1906)

Captured the beauty of his Ukrainian homeland.

http://p.alejka.pl/i2/p_new/44/22/ob...lawski_0_b.jpg

http://baranpochade.com/wp-content/u...C5%82awski.jpg

http://baranpochade.com/wp-content/u...C5%82awski.jpg

http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/S...ges/Dniepr.jpg

Fireatwill November 26th, 2013 02:49 PM

^Those are nice impressionistic works that has a feel and mood embedded in them.

antonina November 26th, 2013 03:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fireatwill (Post 1653688)
^Those are nice impressionistic works that has a feel and mood embedded in them.

Thanks, I also think they're nice - though they're very small size (Stanisławski never painted bigger than A4 :))

That's a last glimpse of Ukraine before Holodomor, collectivization and industrialization...

The Ukrainian steppe, most fertile soil in Europe where 4 -6 million people starved to death thanks to the Soviet Union

http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/S...ges/Chmury.jpg
(see, one just constantly stumbles on the issue here - even in art ;))

Fireatwill November 26th, 2013 07:58 PM

^Impressionism is inherently a bourgeoisie art form, it simply makes light of all that is out there.

Isleifson November 27th, 2013 01:38 AM

Great thread, Antonia.

Claude Le Lorrain.

Claude Gellée - Wikipédia

antonina November 27th, 2013 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Isleifson (Post 1654085)
Great thread, Antonia.

Claude Le Lorrain.

Claude Gellée - Wikipédia

Thank you, the thread shows there are plenty of interesting artists completely unknown outside their countries.

I hope people will keep posting because it's a real pleasure to see artwork I've never seen before.

Your contribution was great, I didn't know such an original artist as the author of those gnomes and beasts existed. Claude Lorraine is very famous, but before your post I didn't realize he came from Lorraine. Looking at his paintings now, they seem to have something of the aura of J.Callot. Callot is disturbingly grotesque, and Lorraine bucolically romantic, but there's a certain wistfulness about both.

Strangely - or perhaps not - artists from one country tend to have something in common, it's undefinable but noticeable.

I'm afraid I know nothing about Lorraine, other than that "Alsace and Lorraine" were contensed by Germany and France.:o

http://www.thecultureconcept.com/cir...de-Lorrain.jpg

Isleifson November 27th, 2013 09:44 AM

Of course there is a influence from Callot on Claude Lorrain. The same goes for Goya.

Claude Lorrain was the painter Nietzsche liked the best and as we all know thank's to Mosquito, Nietzsche was a polnish Nobleman.:)


There is Lorraine and there is Alsatia.

Elsaß und Lothringen.

Callot and Lorrain are both from the french speaking part of Lorraine.

I am from the german speaking part.

Lorraine (region) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Isleifson November 27th, 2013 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by antonina (Post 1653550)
Straight after Beksiński your image of the hanged seemed almost cheerful ;)

I've never heard of him, quite amazing, he's one of a kind, even for the mannerism period.

I wonder what actually caused mannerism, why did things start getting weirder and weirder and then - boom, baroque (best of European art ).

Thank you very much for this link Isleifson.

Jacques Callot (1592-1635) Lorraine

http://www.haa.pitt.edu/callot/images/callot/home7.jpg

http://www.spamula.net/blog/i19/callot23-thumb.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._Violinist.jpg


http://zouchmagazine.com/wp-content/...86a439fde6.jpg


http://zouchmagazine.com/wp-content/...4fbbe1e661.jpg

http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4032/4...d2bb31410d.jpg

http://www.1st-art-gallery.com/thumb...a-Barriere.jpg

And for the baroque

[ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_de_La_Tour"]Georges de La Tour - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]


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