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Old February 9th, 2014, 05:09 PM   #71

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Port View Post
Willie May's career on base percentage was 609
Of my generation he was probably the most exciting player to watch.

watch the video Mays had the ball all along He taps his cap just before catching the ball. a habit he did on difficult plays.

Willie Mays the Catch - YouTube
Willie Mays's career obp was .384
http://www.baseball-reference.com/pl...mayswi01.shtml

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoryOMore View Post
Not sure where the .609 number is coming from - no one has approached that OBP. I certainly think he was the best player I've seen, though he was 35 when I started following baseball.
The single season record for OBP is .609, set by Barry Bonds in 2004. The previous record was .582, set by Barry Bonds in 2002. Before that it was .553, set by Ted Williams in 1941.
http://www.baseball-reference.com/le...c_season.shtml

Last edited by spellbanisher; February 9th, 2014 at 05:17 PM.
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Old March 27th, 2014, 07:17 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by RoryOMore View Post
And Posnanski's list continues to continue:

57. Derek Jeter
56. Chipper Jones
55. Ernie Banks
54. Rod Carew

Negro Leaguers: Bell, Rogan, Leonard, Smokey Joe Williams, (partial Irvin and Campanella)
Japan: Oh (partial Ichiro)
19th Century Players: Radbourn, Nichols
Active Players: Ichiro, Cabrera, Jeter
Posnanski's list rolls on:

53. Steve Carlton
52. Wade Boggs
51. Ken Griffey Jr.
50. Al Kaline
49. Nap Lajoie
48. Bob Feller
47. Albert Pujols

Negro Leaguers: Bell, Rogan, Leonard, Smokey Joe Williams (partial Irvin and Campanella)
Japan: Oh (partial Ichiro)
19th Century Players: Radbourn, Nichols (partial Lajoie)
Active Players: Ichiro, Cabrera, Jeter, Pujols

Baseball 100 | Joe Blogs
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Old March 28th, 2014, 05:18 PM   #73
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I'll go with Willie Mays. 660 homeruns for San Francisco Giants.
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Old April 9th, 2014, 11:55 AM   #74

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Ruth was the best baseball player of all time no question.

Babe Ruth is the only player who would have been a first ballot HOF selection as either a batter or pitcher. As a pitcher for the Red Sox, his record of 27 consecutive scoreless innings in World Series play, stood for more than 30 years until broken by Whitey Ford.

As an outfielder first for the Red Sox and then for the Yankees, Ruth was unquestionably the greatest power hitter of all time. Only five teams hit more home runs than Ruth did by himself in 1919 (not counting Ruth’s own Red Sox), and only two teams had more than his total in 1920 (this time including Ruth’s Yankees, who hit 61 in addition to his 54). Ruth also hit more home runs than half of the teams in baseball in 1921.

Since the thread has recently discussed OBP -

On Base Percentage
All Time Leaders 'Top 1,000'
Name OBP (Raw) Rank Ted Williams .482 (.4817) 1 Babe Ruth .474 (.4739) 2 John McGraw .465 (.4655) 3 Billy Hamilton .455 (.4552) 4 Lou Gehrig .447 (.4474) 5 Barry Bonds .444 (.4443) 6 Rogers Hornsby .434 (.4337) 7 Ty Cobb .433 (.4330) 8 Jimmie Foxx .428 (.4283) 9 Tris Speaker .428 (.4279) 10

Willie Mays at .384 lifetime is tied for no 126 on the alltime list.

But in slugging, it's not even close. Ruth is in a class by himself.

Slugging Average
All Time Leaders 'Top 1,000'
Name Slugging Average Rank Babe Ruth .690 (.68972) 1 Ted Williams .634 (.63379) 2 Lou Gehrig .632 (.63242) 3 Jimmie Foxx .609 (.60929) 4 Barry Bonds .607 (.60689) 5 Hank Greenberg .605 (.60505) 6 Albert Pujols .598 (.59807) 7 Mark McGwire .588 (.58817) 8 Manny Ramirez .585 (.58540) 9 Joe DiMaggio .579 (.57880) 10

Mays is no. 19 and Aaron no. 22 on the alltime list.
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Old April 9th, 2014, 01:55 PM   #75

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Here's a bit more on how Ruth was in a class by himself as a power hitter.

These were his first three years (1919-1921) when he began to leave pitching (He was 9-5 with a 2.90 ERA in 1919 still pitching) and play outfield on a regular basis, after this first four years (1915-1918, plus a portion of 1914) when he was only a pitcher and in those 4 years complied a record of 80 wins 41 losses and a 2.19 ERA.

Major League leaders in HRs 1919

Home Runs s c a p y 1. Ruth (BOS) 29 2. Cravath (PHI) 12 3. Baker (NYY) 10 Kauff (NYG) 10 Sisler (SLB) 10 Walker (PHA) 10

Major League leaders in HRs 1920
Home Runs s c a p y 1. Ruth (NYY) 54 2. Sisler (SLB) 19 3. Walker (PHA) 17 4. Williams (PHI) 15 5. Felsch (CHW) 14

Major League leaders in HRs 1921

Home Runs s c a p y 1. Ruth (NYY) 59 2. Williams (SLB) 24 Meusel (NYY) 24 4. Kelly (NYG) 23 Walker (PHA) 23 6. Hornsby (STL) 21
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Old April 9th, 2014, 04:29 PM   #76

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axel View Post
Here's a bit more on how Ruth was in a class by himself as a power hitter.

These were his first three years (1919-1921) when he began to leave pitching (He was 9-5 with a 2.90 ERA in 1919 still pitching) and play outfield on a regular basis, after this first four years (1915-1918, plus a portion of 1914) when he was only a pitcher and in those 4 years complied a record of 80 wins 41 losses and a 2.19 ERA.

Major League leaders in HRs 1919

Home Runs s c a p y 1. Ruth (BOS) 29 2. Cravath (PHI) 12 3. Baker (NYY) 10 Kauff (NYG) 10 Sisler (SLB) 10 Walker (PHA) 10

Major League leaders in HRs 1920
Home Runs s c a p y 1. Ruth (NYY) 54 2. Sisler (SLB) 19 3. Walker (PHA) 17 4. Williams (PHI) 15 5. Felsch (CHW) 14

Major League leaders in HRs 1921

Home Runs s c a p y 1. Ruth (NYY) 59 2. Williams (SLB) 24 Meusel (NYY) 24 4. Kelly (NYG) 23 Walker (PHA) 23 6. Hornsby (STL) 21
While I have absolutely no problem with George Herman Ruth being named the greatest Baseball player who ever lived I will contend that statistics are not the only tool that we should use to determine the greatest baseball player.

I believe that on late 20's to early 30's Yankee teams Lou Gehrig was of more value to the team than Mr. Ruth. I also believe that there are a plethora of players who are ignored simply because they do not have numbers by their names to denote them as great.

I will assert that Enos Slaughter should be counted among the greatest of all time and he has far fewer numbers than any of those that are commonly considered to be the greatest.

The most important factor when deciding on greatness is not numbers but emotion. There is no greater player in the history of Baseball than "The Commerce Comet" Mickey Mantle. He has a far greater record of being the most important player on a Yankee team than Ruth and I could never consider any player more important or greater than he and I am right without dispute just as you are right without dispute when choosing Ruth.
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Old May 15th, 2014, 01:33 PM   #77
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Posnanski's list rolls on:

53. Steve Carlton
52. Wade Boggs
51. Ken Griffey Jr.
50. Al Kaline
49. Nap Lajoie
48. Bob Feller
47. Albert Pujols
Resuming Posnanski's countdown:

46. Sandy Koufax
45. Yogi Berra
44. Pedro Martinez
43. Warren Spahn

Seems to me Spahn should be higher than 43rd best.
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Old May 24th, 2014, 05:09 PM   #78

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Win–loss record 94–46
Earned run average 2.28

Babe Ruth's PITCHING numbers. Probably would have hit over 1,000 HR if not for his early time on the mound.

Not only should he be considered the greatest baseball player of all time IMO but the greatest American athlete of all time who built America's greatest sports franchise.
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Old May 27th, 2014, 07:32 PM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoryOMore View Post
Resuming Posnanski's countdown:

46. Sandy Koufax
45. Yogi Berra
44. Pedro Martinez
43. Warren Spahn
42. Jackie Robinson

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bishop View Post
Win–loss record 94–46
Earned run average 2.28
Ruth pitched occasionally after he became a fulltime outfielder, and wrapped up his career with a 14-year winning streak (five consecutive wins). He topped it all off with a complete game win when he was 38.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:16 PM   #80
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Not going to bother pushing a certain player here, it's all subjective and who's better or best really means little IMO and is often more about the author than the subject.

Will clear a few things up though:

Ty Cobb did not kill anyone - never happened.

New York did not turn Babe Ruth into a drunk and cause him to die young as suggested. He died at age 53 of throat cancer. He had a lot of money and liked to party but was tamed to a degree by his second wife.

Ruth's 94-46 won-loss record would not have gotten him elected to the Hall of Fame on purely pitching merits as suggested.

Ruth joined New York at age 25 and became a full-time outfielder. He only pitched in 5 games from then through the end of his career and those five starts, scattered from 1920-1933, is such a small sample that it demonstrates little of substance.

Ruth and Cobb were elected to the HOF in the same year, 1936, the first year of voting. Ruth received 215 out of 226 votes, Cobb got 222. That means little as they both should have received 226 votes. The 11 votes that Ruth fell short and the 4 for Cobb only says something about the voters not the ballplayers.

The image of Cobb as a mean old man is highly exaggerated, if true at all. Cobb came to the majors as a teenager and in his opinion he was harassed, verbally, mentally and physically, by much older teammates - even an assault by one that was a former professional boxer. Yet, Cobb is the one labeled as a malcontent. Perhaps this says more about the opinion at the time that it was more okay to bully rookies and treat them poorly than for one to speak up and defend himself. Yes, he was fiery and a hard-nosed ballplayer but that's what made him great.

He had his run-ins but did not sharpen his spikes or a bunch of other bs that has been said about him. He was in the game for well over 2 decades and a respected elder in the game until his death and had lots of friends within the game, many more than he ever had trouble with. He was adored by teammates, opposing players, baseball executives, media members, fans and younger ballplayers.

Cobb made a fortune in General Motors and Coke stock and shared that money liberally with causes as he aged - particularly ones that benefited the black community.

Cobb invited a biographer to help him write another memoir near the time of his death, Al Stump. That book was published in 1961, the year of Cobb's death at age 74. Stump took advantage of an old man, stealing his property and spent decades thereafter forging Cobb's signature and falsifying the authenticity of memorabilia. Stump was also the source behind the awful movie starring Tommy Lee Jones which portrayed Cobb in a silly, unrealistic way. Calling it trash would only elevate Stump to a standard he never attained. It was something worse than trash and it was complete fiction; perhaps considering Stump's respectability the movie and related portrayals can best be described as fraud.

Last edited by Brian McKenna; May 28th, 2014 at 12:21 PM.
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