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Old January 3rd, 2013, 05:12 AM   #1821

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in 1628 - Francesco Maria Guaitoli, composer, dies at 64.
in 1757- Johann Abraham Sixt, organist and composer, is born.
in 1761 - Willem de Fesch, Dutch violinist/composer (Joseph), dies at 73.

in 1785 - Baldassare Galuppi, celebrated Italian composer, called "Il Buranello" after his birthplace, dies at Venice. He began his musical training with his father, a barber and violinist, writing his first opera, La fede nell'incostanza ossia gli amici rioaii, when he was 16.

It failed at its premiere in Vicenza in 1722, so he pursued a thorough course of instruction in composition and keyboard playing with Antonio Lotti. He garnered his first unqualified success as a composer with the opera Dorinda (Venice, June 9, 1729), written in collaboration with G.B. Pescetti, and subsequently wrote numerous operas for the leading Italian opera houses.

From 1740 to 1751 he was maestro di musica of the Ospedale dei Mendicanti in Venice. He was active as a composer in London at the King's Theatre at the Haymarket (1741-43), and also visited Vienna in 1748. He was named vice- maestro of the cappella ducale of S. Marco in Venice in 1748, and in 1762 was made Venice's maestro di cappella. Turning to the new form of opera buffa, he established himself as a master of the genre with his L'Arcadia in Brenta (Venice, May 14, 1749), sealing his fame with his II Filosofo di campagna (Venice, Oct. 26, 1754), which was performed with great acclaim all over Europe.

He was called to Russia in 1765 to serve as music director of the court chapel of Catherine the Great in St. Petersburg; his opera seria lfigenia in Tauride was given at the court on May 2, 1768.

He returned to Venice in 1768, and resumed his post at S. Marco; that same year, he also became maestro di coro of the Ospedale degli Incurabili. Galuppi was a pivotal figure in the development and refinement of opera buffa. His effective vocal and orch. writing, combined with Goldoni's innovative librettos, ensured popular success. He was also a distinguished composer for the keyboard; his sonatas confirm his contemporary renown as a harpsichord virtuoso. - Born on the island of Burano, near Venice, Oct. 18, 1706.

in 1786 - Johann Christian Friedrich Schneider, organist, composer and conductor, is born.
in 1802 - Feliks Ostrowski, composer.
in 1823 - Jaak-Nikolaas Lemmens, organist and composer, is born.
in 1829 - Robert Archibald Smith, composer, dies at 48.
in 1830 - Alexander Ewing, composer is born.

in 1836 - Friedrich Jeremias Witt, cellist and composer, considered the likely author of a Symphony in C major known as the Jena Symphony, once attributed to Ludwig van Beethoven, is born.

in 1853 - Theodor Uhlig, illegitimate son of Frederick Augustus II of Saxony, violinist, writer and composer, dies at 31. Uhlig was a great friend of Richard Wagner, sharing his well known prejudice.

in 1853 - Iwan Knorr, composer is born.
in 1868 - Moritz Hauptmann, music theorist, teacher and composer, dies at 75.
in 1869 - Paul Charles Rene Landormy, musicologist and critic is born.
in 1870 - Henry Eichem, composer, conductor, violinist, organologist, and ethnomusicologist, is born.
in 1873 - John Lodge Ellerton, composer, dies at 71.
in 1875 - Georges Bizet, composer and pianist, known primarily for his opera Carmen, dies at 36.
in 1875 - Baldassare Galuppi, Italian composer (opera's buff), dies at 68.

in 1884 - Raoul Armand Georg von Koczalski, who was considered one of the greatest pianists of his time, is born. Kocsalski was also a composer in addition to writing at least three books and several articles.

in 1895 - Mihail (Gheorghe) Andricu, Romanian pianist, teacher, and composer, is born at Bucharest, dies there, Feb. 4, 1974. He studied at the Bucharest Conservatory (1903-09), later serving on its faculty (1926-59). He was also active as piano accompanist to Georges Enesco.

in 1895 - Borys Mykolayovych Lyatoshynsky, composer, conductor and teacher, is born.

in 1900 - Maurice Jaubert, music journalist and composer of incidental music for stage and film music, music director of the Pathé-Nathan studios, is born.

in 1900 - Edwin George Monk, composer, dies at 80
in 1902 - Preston Jackson James Preston McDonald (American trombonist) is born
in 1904 - Boris Kochno, Russian ballet dancer (La Chatte) is born
in 1907 - Josef Foerster, composer, dies at 73.

in 1909 - Børge Rosenbaum "Victor Borge," pianist and conductor, "The Clown Prince of Denmark," one of the great entertainers of the 20th century, if not of all time, is born. "I only know two pieces, one is 'Clair de Lune', the other one isn't." "The difference between a violin and a viola is that a viola burns longer."
in 1914 - Stéphane Raoul Pugno, composer, teacher, organist, and pianist, famous as a performer of Mozart's works, dies at 62.

in 1914 - Jean Louvel, Flemish pianist/conductor/composer is born.

in 1916 - Maxene Angelyn Andrews, pop singer (Andrews Sisters soprano), member of the Vocal Group Hall of Fame, is born.

in 1916 - Antonio Estevez, composer is born.

in 1917 - Pierre Dervaux, noted French conductor and teacher, is born at Juvisy-sur-Orge. He studied at the Paris Conservatory with Philipp, Armand Perte, Nat, J. and N. Gallon, and Samuel Roussel. After conducting at the Paris Opera-Comique (1945-53), he was permanent conductor at the Paris Opera (1956-70); from 1958 he was also president and chief conductor of the Concerts Colonne in Paris. He was music director of the Orchestre Symphonique de Quebec (1968-71), the Orchestre Philharmonique des Pays de la Loire (1971-78), and in Nice (1979-82). He taught at the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris (1964-86), the Montreal Conservatory (1965-72), and the Nice Academy (1971-82). Dervaux was especially admired for his brilliant and colorful interpretations of the French repertoire. He also composed, producing 2 symphonies., concertos, chamber music, and piano pieces. - Died at Marseilles, Feb. 20, 1992.

in 1918 - Maxene Andrews, Minn, singer (Andrew Sisters-Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy) is born.
in 1922 - Jacques Wildberger, composer and teacher, is born.

in 1923 - Dragutin Gostuski, composer, musicologist, art historian and teacher, director of the Institute of Musicology at the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, is born.

in 1823 - Jaak-Nikolaas Lemmens, Flemish composer is born.
in 1914 - Stephane Raoul Pugno, composer, dies at 62.
in 1916 - Maxene Andrews (US high harmony singer; The Andrews Sisters) is born.

in 1916 - Bernard Greenhouse (US cellist; Beaux Arts Trio) is born.
Video Notes: 95 year old famous cellist Bernard Greenhouse performs "Song of the Birds" (El cant dels ocells) - the Catalan folk song arranged by his teacher - Pablo Casals.
in 1919 - Herbie Nichols (American jazz pianist, composer) is born.
in 1920 - Renato Carosone (Italian jazz singer) is born.
in 1921 - Musa Kaleem (American tenor saxophonist) is born.
in 1922 - Ronald Smith (British pianist) is born.
in 1922 - Harold 'Geezil' Minerve (Cuban international freelance alto saxophonist) is born.
in 1924 - Nell Rankin (American opera singer) is born.
in 1926 - George Martin (UK producer; The Beatles/Humphrey Lyttleton many more) is born.
in 1926 - Danny Overbea, blues adn R&B singer/songwriter and guitarist, a pioneer of rock and roll, is born.
in 1928 - Al Belletto (US alto saxophonist) is born.
in 1929 - Ernst Mahle (Brazilian composer) is born.

in 1932 - (William) Edward Broome, English-born Canadian choral conductor, organist, teacher, and composer, is born at Manchester. He studied in Wales with Roland Rogers (organ and piano, 1876-90) and Jules Riviere (conducting); was awarded a piano diploma from the Royal Academy of Music in London (1884) and was made a Fellow of the Guild of Organists (1889). After settling in Canada, he was awarded the B.Mus. from Trinity Coll., Toronto (1901) and the D.Mus. from the Univ. of Toronto (1908). He served as organist-choirmaster at churches in Brockville, Ontario (1893-95), Montreal (1895-1906), Toronto (1906-25), and Calgary (1926-27). From 1907 he taught at the Toronto Cons, of Music. In 1910 he founded the Toronto Oratorio Soc., which he conducted until 1925. He won 8 first prizes in composition in the Welsh Eisteddfods, including one for his dramatic cantata The Siege of Cardiff Castle (1908). Among his other works were the cantata The Hymn of Trust (1910), various other sacred pieces, and songs. - Died at Toronto, April 28, 1932.

in 1934 - Bryan George Kelly, composer is born.

in 1935 - Charles (Rene Clement) Bouvet, French musicologist, is born at Paris. He studied at the Paris Cons. He organized the Fondation J.S. Bach (1903-11), and in 1924 was appointed archivist of the Paris Opera. He ed. works of Bonporti and Couperin, and also publ. Une Dynastie de musiciens franr;;ais: Les Couperin... (1919), L'Opera (1924), and Massenet (1929). - Died at Paris, May 24, 1935.

in 1936 - Jos Kunst, composer and musicologist, is born.
in 1936 - Ray Goins (US bluegrass banjoist; Pine Fiddlers/Goins Brothers) is born.
in 1938 - Noel Crow (Australian bandleader, clarinetist) is born.

in 1938 - Arturo Berutti (originally, Beruti), Argentine composer of Italian descent, dies at Buenos Aires. He received his early training in music with his father; then went to Leipzig, where he became a student of Jadassohn. He subsequently lived in Italy, where he composed 3 operas: La Vendetta (Vercelli, May 21, 1892), Evangelina (Milan, Sept. 19, 1893), and Taras Bulba (Turin, March 9, 1895). Returning to Argentina in 1896, he premiered the following operas in Buenos Aires: Pampa (July 27, 1897), Yupanki (July 25, 1899), Khrise (June 21, 1902), Horrida Nox (the opera by a native Argentine composer, written to a Spanish libretto, to be produced in Argentina; July 7, 1908), and Los Heroes (Aug. 23, 1919). - Born at San Juan, March 27, 1862.

in 1938 - Ian Hunter-Randall (UK trumpeter) is born
in 1939 - Brian Smith (New Zealand-born flautist, saxophonist) is born
in 1941 - Sergei Rachmaninov's "Symphonic Dances" premieres in Philadelphia.
in 1943 - Van Dyke Parks, singer/songwriter, keyboardist, composer, arranger and producer, is born.

in 1944 - David Atherton, English conductor, is born at Blackpool. He was educated at the University of Cambridge, and in London at the Royal Academy of Music and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. In 1967 he founded the London Sinfonietta, serving as its music director until 1973. From 1968 to 1980 he was resident conductor at London's Covent Garden. He was principal conductor and artistic advisor of the Royal Liverpool Phil. (1980-83), and then was its principal guest conductor (1983-85). From 1981 to 1987 he served as music director of the San Diego Symphony Orchestra. He was principal guest conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra in London (1985-90). He served again as music director of the London Sinfonietta from 1989 to 1991, a position he also held with the Hong Kong Philharmonic from 1989 to 2000.

in 1945 - Stephen Stills, rock guitarist and singer/songwriter, is born.

in 1945 - Fyodor (Stepanovich) Akimenko (real name, Yakimenko), Russian composer, died at Paris, age 68.
He studied with Balakirev at the Court Chapel in St. Petersburg (1886-90), then with Liadov and Rimsky-Korsakov at the St. Petersburg Conservatory (1895-1900). He was the first composition teacher of Stravinsky, whom he taught privately. After the Russian Revolution, he emigrated to Paris. He wrote mostly for piano in the manner of the Russian lyric school. Other works include an opera, The Fairy of the Snows (1914), a concert overture (St. Petersburg, Nov. 20, 1899), an orchestra fantasy (St. Petersburg, Oct. 28, 1900), Petite ballade for Clarinet and Piano, Pastorale for Oboe and Piano, Piano Trio, Violin sonata, Cello Sonata, 2 Sonata-Fantasias for Piano, numerous character pieces for piano, and songs. - Born at Kharkov, Feb. 20,1876.

in 1946 - Motohiko Hino (Japanese international drummer; many sessions) is born.

in 1946 - John Baldwin "John Paul Jones," rock singer/songwriter, bassist, multi-instrumentalist, composer, arranger and record producer, is born.

in 1950 - Beth Anderson (actually, Barbara Elizabeth), inventive American composer and performance artist, is born at Lexington. After piano studies at the University of Ky. (1966-68), she continued piano training at the University of Calif, at Davis, where she also had courses in composition with Larry Austin, Cage, and Richard Swift (B.A., 1971). Following further training in piano (M.F.A., 1973) and in composition (M.A., 1974) with Robert Ashley and Terry Riley at Mills College in Oakland, Calif., she attended N.Y.U. (1977-78). She was co-ed, and publisher of Ear Magazine (1973-79); also taught at the College of New Rochelle in N.Y. (1978-86). As a composer, she has pursued a diagonal tangent upon her own highly original path. Her resources are manifold, passing through a wide spectrum of sound, sight, and motion in specially designed multimedia productions. She espouses text-sound composition, and also applies collage techniques.

in 1951 - Fred Barlow, French composer of English and Alsatian descent, dies at Boulogne, age 69. He studied in Paris with Jean Hure and his cousin Koechlin. - Born at Mulhouse, Oct. 2,1881.

in 1954 - Ross Friedman "Ross the Boss," rock guitarist and songwriter, is born.
in 1955 – Palmolive Paloma Romero (Spanish born drummer; The Slits, The Raincoats) is born.
in 1955 - Helen O'Hara Helen Bevington (Violin, Fiddle; Dexy's Midnight Runners/Whispers) is born.

in 1957 - Guy Mitchell was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Singing The Blues.' (Tommy Steele and Marty Robbins had also released versions and Steele would replace this version at No.1). Also a US No.1.

in 1959 - Rusty Golden, pop and country songwriter and keyboardist, is born.
in 1956 - Alexander Tikhonovich Gretchaninov, Russian Romantic composer, dies at 91.
in 1959 - Ed(ward Emerson) Cuffee, trombonist, dies at N.Y. He was a boyhood friend of Jimmy Archey. He moved to N.Y. in the mid-1920s; shortly afterwards he became a regular on Clarence Williams's recording sessions. He worked with pianist LeRoy Tibbs at Connie's Inn in 1929, then worked with Bingie Madison before working with McKinney's Cotton Pickers (1930-34). During this period Cuffee worked briefly in Ellsworth Reynolds-Kaiser Marshall Bostonians. He was wh Fletcher Henderson (1936-39) and gigged in N.Y. before joining Leon Abbey (1940). He joined Count Basie in January 1941, left seven months later, worked occasionally with Leon Abbey, and then regularly in the Chris Columbus Band in 1944. He gigged and recorded with Bunk Johnson in late 1947 but left full-time music to work as an electrician, although he continued gigging in the 1950s. Ed Cuffee's name was once printed as Cuffee Davidson. The error snowballed and for over 30 years he has been mistakenly referred to by this name. - Born at Norfolk, Va., June 7, 1902.

in 1959 - Rusty Golden, rocker (Boys Band) is born.
in 1961 - Erwin Blom, pop, rock singer, guitarist, keyboardist, is born.

in 1963 - Cliff Richard was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'The Next Time / Bachelor Boy,' both songs were from the film Summer Holiday. His sixth UK No.1.

in 1963 - The Beatles began their first headlining tour with four nights in Scotland appearing at the Two Red Shoes Ballroom, Elgin. Two of the dates were cancelled due to bad weather.

in 1964 - The Beatles were seen for the first time on US TV when a clip from the BBC's 'The Mersey Sound' showing the group playing 'She Loves You' was shown on The Jack Paar Show.

in 1964 - The Rolling Stones appeared at Glenlyn Ballroom in Forest Hill, England, supported by The Detours (later to become The Who).

in 1964 - Raymond McGinley (singer, songwriter, guitarist; Scotland's Teenage Fanclub) is born
in 1964 - Jack Paar Show, shows a clip of the Beatles singing "She Loves You".

in 1965 - Mario Basiola, Italian baritone, dies at Annico. He was a pupil of Cotogni in Rome. In 1918 he made his operatic debut, and then sang in Barcelona (1920) and Florence (1921) before appearing with the San Carlo Opera Co. in the U.S. (1923-25). On Nov. 11, 1925, he made his Metropolitan Opera debut in N.Y. as Amonasro, remaining on its roster until 1932; he then sang at Milan's La Scala and in Rome (1933-38), and at London's Covent Garden (1939). In 1946 he toured Australia, where he taught until 1951; then settled in Milan as a voice teacher. Among his prominent roles were Rossini's Figaro, Valentin, lago, Rigoletto, and Scarpia. - Born at Annico, July 12, 1892.

in 1966 - Martin Galway (Irish composer; computer games) is born.

in 1967 - Mary Garden dies at age 92. Scottish soprano described as "the Sarah Bernhardt of opera"; she spent the latter part of her childhood and youth in America and eventually became a citizen, she also lived in France for many years and eventually retired to Scotland. In 1907, Oscar Hammerstein convinced her to join the Manhattan Opera House in New York where she became an immediate success. By 1910 she was a household name in America and appeared in operas in several major American cities; including performing with the Boston Opera Company and the Philadelphia Opera Company. Between 1910-1932 Mary worked in several opera houses in Chicago and joined the Chicago Opera Association dies at age 1915, ultimately becoming the company's director in 1921. Although director for only one year, she was notably responsible for staging the world premiere of Sergei Prokofiev's The Love for Three Oranges before the company went bankrupt in 1922. Shortly thereafter she became the director of the Chicago Civic Opera where she commissioned the opera Camille by 28 year old composer Hamilton Forrest. She sang roles at the Civic Opera until 1931, notably in several US and world premieres. Also Mary appeared in two silent films made by Samuel Goldwyn. After retiring from the opera stage in 1934, Mary worked as a talent scout for MGM.
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Old January 3rd, 2013, 05:16 AM   #1822

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3 JANUARY
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in 1967 - Having received a US army draft notice, Beach Boy Carl Wilson refused to be sworn in, saying he was a conscientious objector.

in 1967 - The Bee Gees were at No.1 on the Australian singles chart with the single 'Spickes and Speckes.'

in 1969 - James Carter, jazz saxophonist, is born at Detroit, Mich. Carter's musical education consisted of private studies with local bop-scene veteran Donald Washington as well as tenures at the prestigious Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp. Carter first came to national attention touring with Wynton Marsalis while only 17. Since then, he has worked with Lester Bowie, Julius Hemphill, the Charles Mingus Big Band, the Lincoln Center Jazz Orch., and Kathleen Battle, among many others. He appeared in Jazz at Lincoln Center: The City of Jazz (PBS, 1994), in the film Kansas City (1995), and in Live at Newport 1996 (PBS). He is one of a few of the younger players to embrace the avant-garde jazz stylings of the 1960s and 1970s. Although he is a favorite of critics and audiences, many musicians find his style bizarre and grand-standing.

in 1969 - Appearing live on The Lulu show on UK TV, Jimi Hendrix was booked to perform two songs, Voodoo Child, (which is performd in full), then he stopped performing his new single ‘Hey Joe’ after a verse and chorus and instead launched into a version of the Cream song 'Sunshine Of Your Love' as a tribute to the band who had split a few days earlier. Hendrix then proceeded to continuing jamming, running over their allocated time slot on the live show, preventing the show’s host Lulu from closing the show properly.

in 1969 - John Lennon's "2 Virgins" album declared pornographic in NJ.
in 1969 - Nikki Nelson, Topaz Lake Nev, country singer (Highway 101-Cry Cry Cry) is born.
in 1969 - James Carter (US saxophones, flute, bass clarinet; session/freelance) is born.
in 1970 - B J Thomas started a four week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head.' The song was featured in the film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

in 1970 - Working on the Get Back sessions at Studio Two of EMI Studios, London, three Beatles (Paul, George, and Ringo) record 16 takes of the George Harrison song ‘I Me Mine.’ John Lennon was away in Denmark at the time. A decade later it became the title of George Harrison's auto-biography.

in 1972 - Two weeks of rehearsals for Pink Floyd’s Dark Side Of The Moon tour began at the Bermondsey in London, England, (the venue was owned by The Rolling Stones).

in 1972 - Jacques Wildberger, composer is born.
in 1972 - Nichole Nordeman (US christian singer-songwriter) is born.

in 1973 - Bruce Springsteen played the first of a 4 night run at The Main Point, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, opening for the comedy rock duo Travis Shook & The Club Wow.

in 1973 - Two thousand international fashion editors and experts voted Mick and Bianca Jagger two of the top dozen best-dressed men and women of 1972.

in 1973 - Wilbur DeParis, leader, trombonist, occasionally drummer, dies at N.Y., Jan. 3, 1973.
His brother, Sidney, was a trumpeter; their father was a bandmaster and music teacher. He began on alto hom at the age of 7, and was soon working with his father's carnival band. Later he played tent shows and toured on the T.O.B.A, circuit. He traveled to New Orleans (c. 1922) with Mack's Merrymakers, and sat in on 'C' melody sax with Louis Armstrong. From 1925 he regularly led his own band in Philadelphia, and also worked with various other local bands. In 1927-28, he managed the big band resident at the Pearl Theatre, Philadelphia. He relocated to N.Y.toward the end of the decade, and during the 1930s worked with various groups, including Noble Sissle (for a European tour in 1931), and Mills Blue Rhythm Band (recording in 1937). He was with Teddy Hill from late 1936-37, including a trip to Europe, then with Louis Armstrong (November 1937 until September 1940).Briefly with the Ella Fitzgerald Orch., DeParis then worked in the pit band for the Broadway show The Pirate (1942). During spring 1943, he toured with the Roy Eldridge Big Band, and then led his own small band, before joining Duke Ellington from late 1945 until May 1947. He also recorded with Sidney Bechet in 1946, 1949, and 1950. He reformed his own highly successful small band (with brother Sidney DeParis and Omer Simeon), mainly resident at Jimmy Ryan's in N.Y. from 1951 until early 1962 (he toured Africa in the spring of 1957, a U.S. State-Department sponsored trip). The band continued to work various clubs through the 1960s.He led his own rehearsal studio in N.Y. (1971), and worked as both leader and arranger until 1972. - Born at Crawfordsville, Ind., Jan. 11, 1900.

in 1974 - Bob Dylan and The Band started a 39-date US tour, Dylan's first live appearance for over 7 years. There were more than 5 million applications for the 660,000 tickets.

in 1975 - Milton J Cross, TV announcer (Met Opera Auditions), dies at 87.
in 1975 - Thomas Bangalter (French disc jockey of Daft Punk fame) is born.
in 1976 - Mateusz Glinski, composer, dies at 83.
in 1976 - Mal Evans, Beatles' roadie, dies.

in 1976 - Bob Dylan's song, 'Hurricane', peaked at No.33 on the Billboard singles chart, helping to cause enough publicity to eventually get former boxer Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter released from jail. The song promoted Carter's innocence and a movie about Carter's life, starring Denzel Washington, was released in 2000.

in 1976 - The Bay City Rollers went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Saturday Night.' At the height of their US success, the Scottish group signed a deal to promote breakfast cereal.

in 1977 - Michelle Stephenson (UK singer, TV presenter/The Spice Girls-briefly) is born
in 1978 - Kimberley Locke (American Singer) is born.
in 1979 - The Hype, (later to be known as U2) appeared at McGonagils in Dublin, Ireland.

in 1980 - Rob Arnold (US guitarist; Chimaira) is born.
in 1981 - David Bowie made his final appearance as the Elephant Man in the Broadway show in New York City.
in 1982 - During a UK tour Adam and the Ants appeared at The Apollo, Manchester.

in 1980 - Amos Milburn dies at age 52. American blues & boogie pianist, singer born in Houston. He was one of the greatest pioneers in the history of R&B pounding out some of the most hellacious boogies of the postwar era, usually recording in Los Angeles for Aladdin Records, specializing in good-natured upbeat romps about booze and its effects that proved massive hits during the immediate pre-rock era. "Hold Me Baby" and "Chicken Shack Boogie" landed numbers eight and nine on Billboard's survey of 1949's R&B Bestsellers. Among his best known songs was "One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer". In 1950 his "Bad, Bad, Whiskey" reached the top of the R&B charts and began a string of drinking songs. Amos's final recording was on an album by Johnny Otis. This was in 1972 after he had been incapacitated by a stroke, so much so that Otis had to play the left-hand piano parts for his old friend. (His second stroke led to the amputation of a leg because of circulatory problems.
in 1985 - Lucien Cailliet, exceptional French-born American composer, arranger, and conductor; dies at Woodland Hills, Calif. He gained experience as an instrumentalist and bandmaster in the French Army, and received training at the Dijon Conservatpru and from Fauchet, Caussade, and Pares at the Paris Conservatory (graduated, 1913). In 1915 he emigrated to the U.S. and in 1923 became a naturalized citizen. In 1919 he joined the Philadelphia Orchestra as a clarinetist, and also was active with it as an arranger (several of his arrangements appeared under Stokowski's cognomen, with the approval of Cailliet). He also taught at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. In 1937 he was awarded a doctorate in music by the Philadelphia Musical Academy. From 1938 to 1945 he taught orchestration, counterpoint, and conducting at the University of Southern Calif, in Los Angeles. Between 1945 and 1957 he wrote some 25 film scores for Hollywood. He also made appearances as a guest conductor. From 1957 to 1976 he was educational and musical director of the G. Leblanc Corp. He prepared an orchestration of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition (1937). Among his original works were Memories of Stephen Foster for Orchestra (1935), Variations on "Pop Goes the Weasel" for Orchestra (1938), band music, and clarinet pieces. For a complete list of his works, see L. Fisher, "L. C: His Contribution to the Symphonic Band, Orchestra, and Ensemble Literature/' Journal of Band Research, XVIII/2 (1983). - Born at Chalons-sur- Marne, May 22, 1891.

in 1986 - Jens Bjerre Jacobsen, composer and organist, dies at 82.
in 1986 - Lloyd Polite (UK R&B singer) is born.
in 1987 - Aretha Franklin became the first woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
in 1989 - Julia Nunes (US singer, ukulele player) is born

in 1989 - Eddie Heywood Jr dies at age 73. American jazz pianist, born in Georgia, he became very popular in the 1940s. He played with several popular jazz musicians such as Wayman Carver in 1932, Clarence Love from 1934 to 1937 and Benny Carter from 1939 to 1940 after which moving to New York. After starting his own band, he occasionally played back-up for Billie Holiday in 1941. In 1943, he put together the first sextet, including Doc Cheatham and Vic Dickenson. After their version of "Begin the Beguine" became a hit in 1944, they had three successful years. Between 1947 to 1950, he was stricken with a partial paralysis of his hands and could not play at all. In the 1950s, Eddie wrote and recorded "Land of Dreams" and "Soft Summer Breeze" and is probably best known for his 1956 recording of "Canadian Sunset," all of which he recorded with Hugo Winterhalter and his orchestra. After a second partial paralysis in the 1960s, Heywood made another comeback and continued his career in the 1980s. Eddie has a "Star" on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
in 1990 - Arthur Gold dies at age 72. American pianist; he met fellow pianist Robert Fizdale during their student years at Juilliard. They formed a lifelong gay partnership based around their interests of music and formed one of the most important Piano duos of the 20th century. Some say that Gold and Fizdale revolutionized the art of performing as a 2-piano duo, agree or not, they were commissioned and premièred many of the most important works for this ensemble in the second half of the 20th century, including works by John Cage, Paul Bowles, Virgil Thomson, Ned Rorem and many other important American Composers. The Duo released recordings featuring works by Les Six, Vittorio Rieti, and many other composers, as well as a series of Concerto recordings with Leonard Bernstein and The New York Philharmonic, including the Poulenc Concerto for Two Pianos, The Mozart Two Piano Concerto and Saint-Saëns's "Carnival of the Animals"
in 1992 - Anthony Del Casino, swing band leader (Charlie Barnett Orchestra), dies at 79
in 1992 - Lewis Michael Friedman, pianist, dies at 47 of AIDS.
in 1992 - Simple Minds singer Jim Kerr married actress Patsy Kensit at Chelsea register office.
in 1995 - Al Duncan, drummer, dies at 68
in 1997 - Burton Lane, composer, dies at 84
in 1999 - Steps scored their first UK No.1 single with their version of The Bee Gees song 'Tragedy.'

in 2000 - Nat(haniel Sr.) Adderley, jazz cornetist; brother of Cannonball Adderley, dies at Lakeland, Fla. Under his father's and brother's influence, Nat took up trumpet in 1946, switched to cornet in 1950, and played in an army band from 1951-53. After touring with Lionel Hampton (1954-55), he joined his brother's first quintet until late 1957, then worked with J. J. Johnson and a Woody Herman small group before rejoining his brother from September 1959 through Cannonball's death in July 1975. Nat's "Work Song" and "Jive Samba" were among the group's most popular compositions. He led his own quintets beginning in 1975, and sometimes played mellophone and French horn. In 1997, Adderley had his right leg amputated in Lakeland, Fla., due to diabetes. He retired from playing music, and died from complications of his disease in early 2000. His son, Nat Adderley Jr., is an accomplished pianist and longtime musical director for popular singer Luther Vandross. - Born at Tampa, Fla., Nov. 25, 1931.

in 2000 - Luciano Pavarotti agreed to pay the Italian authorities £1.6 million ($2.72 million) after losing an appeal against tax evasion charges. It was reported that the singer was worth £300 million ($510 million) at the time.

in 2002 - Liam and Noel Gallagher topped a poll of celebrities you would least like to live next to, getting 40% of the vote. Readers of Your Home magazine voted the brothers from Oasis as 'Neighbours From Hell'.

in 2002 - Zak Foley bassist with EMF died aged 31. The group had the 1990 world-wide hit single 'Unbelievable.'

in 2004 - It was reported that UK record companies were about to ditch up to 30 big names in the pop world due to poor record sales in the previous year. Gareth Gates, The Cheeky Girls, Mark Owen, Mel C and Samantha Mumber were among those listed.

in 2002 - Juan García Esquivel dies at age 83. Mexican band leader, pianist, and film score composer, born in Tampico. He is recognized today as one of the foremost exponents of a sophisticated style of largely instrumental music that combines elements of lounge music and jazz with Latin flavors. He is called by many "The King of Space Age Pop" and "The Busby Berkley of Cocktail Music" and is considered one of the foremost exponents of a style of late 1950s-early 1960s quirky instrumental pop that became known as "Space Age Bachelor Pad Music". He arranged many traditional Mexican songs like "Bésame Mucho", "La Bamba", "El Manisero" and "La Bikina"; also Brazilian songs like "Aquarela do Brasil"/"Brazil", "Surfboard" and "Agua de Beber", and composed spicy lounge-like novelties such as "Mini Skirt", "Yeyo", "Latin-Esque", "Mucha Muchacha" and "Whatchamacallit". He was commissioned to compose the music of a Mexican children's TV show Odisea Burbujas. Juan's concerts featured elaborate light shows years before effects like that became popular in live music. He performed in Las Vegas on several occasions, often as the opening act for Frank Sinatra
in 2007 - Janos Furst dies at age 71. Hungarian orchestral conductor, he originally studied the violin at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music in his native Budapest. After the 1956 Soviet invasion of Hungary, he continued studies at the conservatory in Brussels. He attended the Conservatoire de Paris and there won a Premier Prix. He took a job in 1958 with the Radio Éireann Symphony Orchestra, and developed his career as an orchestra leader. In 1963, he founded the Irish Chamber Orchestra, and became concertmaster of the Ulster Orchestra in 1966. In the 70s, 80s and 90s he held positions as Chief Conductor and-or Music Director, and recorded with orchestras in Malmö, Aalborg, Winterthur, Dublin, the Opéra de Marseille and was Chief Guest Conductor of the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra. He worked and recorded with many others including the Bamberg Symphony Orchestra

in 2010 - Gustavo Becerra-Schmidt dies at age 84. Chilean composer, a prolific composer in Chile before he moved to Germany to teach at Oldenburg University, a job he held since 1974. His catalogue includes 100s of compositions that goes from the most traditional to the most avant-garde, from popular songs to large scale cantatas, symphonies and oratorios. Highlights are his cantatas La Araucana and Lord Cochrane de Chile, the Macchu Picchu oratorio on texts by Neruda, the Concerto for Flute & Strings, and a most recent Harp Concerto from 2006, not forgetting the electroacoustic works. Gustavo also was an important teacher, some of his pupils were or are among the most important composers of Chile, these include Luis Advis, Sergio Ortega, Fernando García, and Cirilo Vila (lung cancer.
in 1955 - Elvis Presley appeared in Boonesville, Virginia. The 20 year-old singer was still a regional star, but by the end of 56' he had become a national sensation, recording two albums, (which included 'Heartbreak Hotel' and 'Blue Suede Shoes'), appeared on national television 11 times, played over 100 concerts and signed a seven year contract with Paramount Pictures.

in 2011 - Geraldo Flach dies at age 65. Brazilian pianist, composer, and considered one of the leading names in instrumental music in southern Brazil. He collaborated with the likes of Nana Caymmi, Ivan Lins, Renato Borghetti and Yamandu Costa, and had songs recorded by Elis Regina, and Emilio Santiago Taiguara, among others. His work, which mixes folk roots with urban music filtered into the language of jazz, was awarded in Brazil and abroad (cancer).
in 2011 - Suchitra Mitra dies at age 86. Indian singer, composer and a well respected exponent of Rabindra Sangeet or the songs of Bengal's poet laureate Rabindranath Tagore. As an academic she remained a Professor and the Head of 'Rabindra Sangeet Department' at the Rabindra Bharati University for many years. She has also done playback singing and acted in a Bengali films as well, and for many years remained associated with IPTA. Some of her notable awards include: Tagore Hymn Prize in 1945 from London Tagore Hymn Society, Padma Shri in 1973 from the Government of India, Sangeet Natak Academy Award in 1986 from the Government of India, HMV Golden Disc Award, Shiromoni Puraskar from Asian Paints, Desikottama from Visva-Bharati, Allauddin Puraskar from the Government of West Bengal, among numerous others (cardiac arrest).
in 2012 - Enrique de Melchor/Enrique Jiménez Ramírez dies at age 61. Spanish flamenco guitarist, born near Seville, but lived in Madrid most of his life. Considered the equal of Paco de Lucia and Manolo SanLucar, he has worked with the soulful greats among flamenco singers, including Antonio Mairena, Camarón de La Isla, La Perla de Cádiz, Pansequito, Rocío Jurado, Chiquetete, El Lebrijano, El Fary, María Jiménez and José Menese among others. As a soloist, he appears at venues such as Queen Elizabeth Hall in London, Carnegie Hall in New York, along with the Madrid’s Teatro Real de Madrid and Barcelona’s Liceo. He also accompanied Spanish opera singers Montserrat Caballé and José Carreras (cancer) - Born July 15th 1950.

in 2012 - Robert 'Bob' Weston dies at age 64. British musician born in Plymouth, Devon, best known for his brief role as guitarist and songwriter with the rock band Fleetwood Mac in late 1972-74. He recorded the Penguin album in January 1973 as a lead guitarist alongside Bob Welch, but stood out on his slide guitar, especially on "Remember Me", and his accomplished harmonica and banjo playing. He also sang with Christine McVie on the song "Did You Ever Love Me", and wrote the instrumental, "Caught in the Rain". Bob went on to record with Murray Head, then briefly join, along with bassist Nick South and drummer Ian Wallace, Steve Marriott's newly formed All-Stars Band. When Marriott opted to play lead guitar himself, Bob went on to do a few solo albums. In January 2008, he started working on new recordings, recorded at Markant Studios in the Netherlands and were released later in the year (found dead in his flat at Brent Cross, London) - Born November 1st 1947.

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in 1710 - Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, remarkable Italian composer, is born at Jesi, near Ancona.
The origin family name was Draghi; the name Pergolesi was derived from the town of Pergola, where Pergolesi's ancestors lived. He was the only surviving child of his parents, 3 others having died in infancy. His childhood seems to have been plagued by ill health; a later caricature depicts him as having a deformed leg.

He first studied music with Francesco Santi, the maestro di cappella of the Jesi Cathedral. He also studied violin with Francesco Mondini. He then was given a stipend by the Marchese Cardolo Maria Pianetti, which enabled him to enter the Conservatory dei Poveri di Gesu Cristo in Naples, where he studied violin with Domenico de Matteis, and composition with Gaetano Greco, its maestro di cappella, Leonardo Vinci, and Francesco Durante.

Pergolesi became highly proficient as a violinist, playing at the Conservatorio and throughout Naples. His first work to be performed was the dramma sacro Li prodigi della divina grazia nella conversione di S. Guglielmo Duca d'Aquitania, which was given by the Conservatory at the monastery of S. Agnello Maggiore in 1731. He graduated shortly thereafter, and received a commission for his first opera, La Salustia (Naples, Jan. 1732). He then became maestro di cappella to Prince Ferdinando Colonna Stigliano, equerry to the Viceroy of Naples, in 1732. His Lo Frate 'nnamorato (Naples, Sept. 27, 1732) proved highly successful.

In Dec. 1732 he composed several sacred works for performance at the church of S. Maria della Stella as a votive offering following a series of severe earthquakes in Naples. He was next commissioned to write an opera seria to celebrate the birthday of the empress on Aug. 28,1733; however, the premiere of the resulting // Prigionier superbo was delayed until Sept. 5,1733; it contained the 2-act intermezzo La Serva padrona, which became his most celebrated stage work. He was named deputy to the maestro di cappella of Naples in 1734.

During a brief sojourn in Rome, his Mass in F major was performed at the church of S. Lorenzo in Lucina (May 16, 1734). After returning to Naples, Pergolesi became maestro di cappella to Marzio Domenico IV Carafa, the Duke of Maddaloni. For the birthday of the king's mother, he was commissioned to write the opera Adriano in Siria; it was premiered, without success, in Naples on Oct. 25, 1734, with the intermezzo La Contadina astuta (subsequently staged under various titles). He then was commissioned to write an opera for Rome's Teatro Tordinona, resulting in his unsuccessful opera seria L'Olimpiade (Jan. 8 or 9, 1735). His last popular success for the stage was the commedia musicale // Flaminio (Naples, 1735).

By 1735 his health had seriously declined, most likely from tuberculosis. Early in 1736 he went to the Franciscan monastery in Pozzuoli, where he soon died at the age of 26. He was buried in the common grave adjacent to the Cathedral. Following his death, his fame spread rapidly through performances of La Serva padrona and several other stage works. The Paris revival of the work in 1752 precipitated the so-called querelle des bouffons between the partisans of the Italian and French factions.

His fame was further increased by performances of the Salve regina in C minor and the Stabat Mater in F minor. The chaotic entanglement of spurious, doubtful, and authentic works attributed to Pergolesi was unraveled in M. Paymer's G.B. P.: A Thematic Catalogue of the Oper Omnia with an Appendix Listing Omitted Compositions (N.Y., 1976). The Opera Omnia, ed. by F. CafTarelli (5 vols., Rome, 1939-42), is most unreliable; it is being replaced by a critical ed., the first vol. of which appeared in 1985. - Died Pozzuoli, near Naples, March 16, 1736.

in 1717 - Antonio Maria Mazzoni, opera composer, director of the Accademia Filarmonica, is born.

in 1720 - Johann Friedrich Agricola, composer, organist, singer, pedagogue, and writer on music, is born. A student of Johann Sebastian Bach, he was court composer to Frederick the Great, and also was the conductor of the royal orchestra.

in 1759 - Maria Rosa Coccia, composer is born.
in 1765 - Joseph Franz Xaver Dominik Stalder, classical composer, dies at 39.
in 1773 - Johann Peter Heuschkel, oboist, organist, music teacher and composer, is born.

in 1774 - Johann Friedrich Agricola, German organist, teacher, and composer, born at Dobitschen.
He went to Leipzig, where he studied law at the University (1738-41), and was a student of Bach. In 1741 he settled in Berlin and completed his training with Quantz. He was made a court composer in 1751, the same year that he married Benedetta Emilia Agricola (nee Molteni). In 1759 he became music director of the Opera. He was a proponent of Italian musical taste and published pseudonymous pamphlets of a polemical nature (1749). He also translated and edited Tosi's singing treatise of 1723 as Anleitung zur Singkunst (Berlin, 1757; Eng. tr. and commentary, 1995, by J. Baird). - Died at Berlin, Dec. 2, 1774.

in 1805 - Stephan Hale Alonzo Marsh, harpist and composer, who claimed to have written Australia's first opera ("A Gentleman in Black"), is born.

in 1807 - Baltasar Saldoni, composer and musicologist, is born.
in 1809 - Bartolomeo Giacometti, composer, dies at 67.
in 1843 - Gaetano Donizetti's opera "Don Pasquale" premieres in Paris.

in 1844 - Thomas H Rollinson "Rollin Thomson," cornettist, conductor and composer (mainly band music), is born.

in 1864 - Mateo Ferrer, composer, dies at 75.
in 1870 - Percy Pitt, organist and conductor, director of the British National Opera Company, is born.
in 1874 - Josef Suk, violinst, composer and teacher, is born.
in 1881 - Johannes Brahms' "Academic Festival Overture" premieres in Breslau.
in 1883 - Nicolas Ledesma, composer, dies at 91.
in 1885 - Eduard Yosif Kotek, violinist and composer, dies at 29.

in 1893 - Manuel Palau Boix, composer, musicologist and teacher, director of the Instituto Valenciano de Musicología, is born.

in 1894 - Wesley La Violette, composer and teacher, head of Allied Arts Center in Los Angeles, is born.

in 1898 - Roger Vuataz, pianist, organist, composer, choirmaster, choral director, conductor, teacher, lecturer, music critic and musicologist, is born.

in 1898 - Frantisek Pivoda, composer, dies at 73.
in 1916 - Lionel Newman (US conducter, pianist, TV & film music composer) is born
in 1922 - Frank Wess, jazz saxophonist, flautist, composer and bandleader, NEA Jazz Master, is born.
in 1923 - Flavio Testi, composer and musicologist, is born.
in 1923 - Don Butterfield (American classical and jazz tuba player) is born.
in 1936 - John Gorman (UK singer,director for entertainment; Scaffold/Weekend TV) is born.

in 1936 - Billboard Magazine introduced the first ever-pop music chart that ranked records on national sales; big band violinist Joe Venuti was the first No.1.

in 1937 - Grace (Melzia Ann) Bumbry, greatly talented black American mezzo-soprano and soprano, is born at St. Louis. She attended Boston University and Northwestern University, and pursued vocal training with Lehmann at the Music Academy of the West in Santa Barbara (1955-58) and with Bernac in Paris. With Martina Arroyo, she was co-winner of the Metropolitan Opera auditions in 1958. In 1960 she made a notably successful operatic debut as Amneris at the Paris Opera. In 1961 she became the first black American singer to appear at the Bayreuth Festival when she sang Venus in Tannhauser. In 1963 she made her Covent Garden debut in London as Eboli, and her Chicago Lyric Opera debut as Ulrica. In 1964 she sang Lady Macbeth at her first appearance at the Salzburg Festival. She made her Metropolitan Opera debut in N.Y. as Eboli on Oct. 7, 1965, and subsequently sang there regularly. From 1970 she concentrated on the soprano repertoire. Among her distinguished roles at the Metropolitan were Carmen (1967), Santuzza (1970), Tosca (1971), Salome (1973), Venus (1977), Leonora in II Trovatore (1982), and Gershwin's Bess (1985). In 1990 she sang Berlioz's Cassandre at the opening of the new Opera de la Bastille in Paris. She also appeared as a soloist with major orchestras and as a recitalist.
in 1939 - Jon Howard Appleton, composer and teacher who was a pioneer in electro-acoustic music, is born. He helped in the development of the Synclavier, and to found the Theremin Center for Electronic Music.

in 1941 - Joe Renzetti (US film composer) is born.
in 1942 - "Mahavishnu" John McLaughlin, jazz fusion guitarist, keyboardist and composer, is born.

in 1942 - Leon Jessel, conductor, composer of operettas, known for "The March of the Tin Soldiers," dies at 70 after being tortured by the Gestapo.

in 1944 - Jimmy Campbell (UK singer, songwriter; The Kirkbys/23rd Turnoff/Rockin' Horse) is born.
in 1944 - Volker Hornback, electronic music keyboardist (Tangerine Dream), is born.
in 1945 - Jay Dee Maness, country pedal steel guitarist, is born.
in 1945 - Vesa-Matti "Vesku" Loiri (Finnish actor, singer, flutist, comedian) is born.
in 1946 - Arthur Conley, soul singer/songwriter, is born.
in 1946 - Susannah McCorkle (US jazz singer) is born.
in 1947 - Chris Cutler (UK drummer; Henry Cow/Pere Ubu/Residents) is born.

in 1954 - Elvis Presley made his second visit to the Memphis recording service and cut two songs onto a 10 acetate, 'Casual Love Affair 'and 'I'll Never Stand In Your Way'. Studio boss Sam Phillips asked Presley to leave his phone number.

in 1954 - Eugene Chadbourne (US guitarist, composer; Camper Van Chadbourne/Shockabilly) is born
in 1955 - Mark Hollis, pop singer/songwriter, guitarist, keyboardist, (Talk Talk), is born.
in 1955 - François Rasse, composer and music educator, dies at 81.
in 1955 - Kathy Forester, Lookout Mt Ga, country singer (Forester Sister-Men) is born
in 1955 - Dominicus Johner, composer, dies at 80.
in 1955 - Clive Gregson (UK singer, songwriter, guitar; Clive Gregson & Christine Collister, Any Trouble) is born.
in 1956 - Nels Cline (US guitarist, composer) is born.
in 1956 - Alexandr Tikhonovich Grechaninov, composer, dies at 91.
in 1956 - Bernard Albrecht, English pop guitarist (Joy Division) is born.
in 1956 - Bernard Sumner, rock singer, guitarist, keyboardist and percussionist (Joy Division, New Order), is born.
in 1957 - Patty Loveless, country singer/songwriter, is born.
in 1957 - Gurdas Maan (Eminent Punjabi singer, actor, lyricist) is born.

in 1957 - Elvis Presley had his pre-induction medical check up at Kennedy Veterans Hospital, a preliminary to his call up from the US Army.

in 1958 - Marcel Neville King (UK singer; Sweet Sensation/solo) is born.
in 1960 - Michael Stipe, rock singer/songwriter, guitarist, keyboardist, harmonica player, (R. E. M.), is born.
in 1960 - Marty Robbins started a two week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'El Paso'. A No.19 in the UK.
in 1962 - Martin McAloon, rock bassist (Prefab Sprout), is born.
in 1962 - Robin Guthrie (Scottish guitar, keyboards, programming; Cocteau Twins) is born.
in 1962 - Peter Steele Petrus T. Ratajczyk (US singer, bassist; Fallout/Carnivore/Type O Negative) is born.

in 1962 - Liverpool's Mersey Beat published its first popularity poll, with The Beatles coming in first place and Gerry and the Pacemakers voted second.

in 1963 - Till Lindemann (German singer; Rammstein) is born
in 1965 - David Glasper, pop singer/songwriter (Breathe), is born.
in 1965 - Caitlín O'Riordan, rock bassist and singer/songwriter (The Pogues), is born.
in 1965 - The Fender guitar company was bought by CBS for $13 million.
in 1965 - Beth Gibbons (UK singer; Portishead) is born
in 1965 - Cait O'Riordan (UK bassist; Pogues/Elvis Costello) is born
in 1966 - Deana Carter, country singer/songwriter, guitarist, mandolin player, is born.
in 1967 - David Berman (US poet and singer/songwriter; Silver Jews) is born
in 1967 - Benjamin Darvill (Canadian harmonica, mandolin, acoustic, electric guitar; Crash Test Dummies) is born.

in 1967 - The Jimi Hendrix Experience played the first of what would be over 240 gigs in this year when they appeared at the Bromel Club, Bromley. (Many of the concerts were two shows per night).

in 1967 - The Doors released their self-titled debut album The Doors. Unique packaging of the album included each band member’s bio.

in 1968 - The University of California, Los Angeles announced that students taking music degrees would have to study the music of The Rolling Stones saying they had made such an important contribution to modern music.

in 1969 - Montague Fawcett Phillips, classical composer, dies at 83.

in 1969 - Paul Laurence Dunbar Chambers Jr. dies at age 33. American musician born in Pittsburgh, he was one of the most influential jazz bassists of the 20th century. A prominent figure in many rhythm sections during the 50s and 60s, his importance in the development of jazz bass can be measured not only by the length and breadth of his work in this short period but also his impeccable time, intonation, and virtuosic improvisations. He was in great demand as a session musician recording with dozens of greats, including such landmarks as Thelonious Monk's Brilliant Corners, Coltrane's Giant Steps, and Oliver Nelson's The Blues and the Abstract Truth. Many musicians wrote songs dedicated to Paul. Red Garland, wrote the tune "The P.C. Blues", and Coltrane's song "Mr. P.C.", Tommy Flanagan wrote "Big Paul", which was performed on the John Coltrane and Kenny Burrell Prestige 1958 LP. Max Roach wrote a drum solo called "Five For Paul", on his 1977 "impossible to find" drum solo LP recorded in Japan, and Sonny Rollins wrote "Paul's Pal" for him
in 1969 - UK music weekly Disc and Music Echo reported that The Beatles were to release five new albums. One would be their first ever live album plus four separate LP's, each one the choice of Lennon, McCartney, Harrison and Starr.

in 1970 - Chauffeur Neil Boland was accidentally killed when The Who's drummer Keith Moon ran over him. Moon was trying to escape from a Gang of skinheads after a fight broke out at a pub in Hatfield, England. Moon had never passed his driving test.

in 1970 - The Beatles (without John Lennon) re-record vocals and a new guitar solo on the Paul McCartney song ‘Let It Be’ at Studio Two, EMI Studios, London. This session will be the final studio appearance for The Beatles, as a group. (The final date that all four of The Beatles were in the studio together is August 20, 1969).

in 1970 - Beatles last recording session at EMI studios

in 1972 - Carl-Olof Anderberg, pianist, composer and conductor, founder of the Malmö Chamber Orchestra, dies at 57.
in 1974 - Karel Janacek, composer, dies at 70
in 1974 - Ian Moor (UK singer) is born.

in 1974 - Bruce Springsteen played the first of a three night run at Joes’ Place in Cambridge Massachusetts. Supported by Peter Johnson & The Manic Depressives. On the ticket it said: “Because of the energy crisis all our outside lights except for one will be shut off”.

in 1975 - Elton John started a two week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with his version of The Beatles 'Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds'. His third US No.1, the song featured John Lennon on guitar.

in 1976 - Former Beatles roadie Mal Evans was shot dead by police at his Los Angeles apartment. His girlfriend called police when she found Evans upset with a rifle in his hand; he pointed the gun at the police who opened fire.

in 1977 - The Sex Pistols shocked passengers and airline staff at Heathrow Airport when they spat and vomited boarding a plane to Amsterdam.

in 1977 - Timothy Wheeler (Irish guitarist, vocals; Irish band Ash) is born
in 1978 - Mai Meneses María Isabel González-Meneses García-Valdecasas (Spanish singer) is born
in 1979 - Charles Mingus, jazz bassist, dies of heart attack
in 1979 - Jeph Howard (US bassist; The Used) is born
in 1981 - Silvy Melody Silvy De Bie (Belgian singer; Sylver) is born

in 1981- Ruth Lowe dies at age 66. Canadian songwriter, pianist born in Toronto; in 1936, she became a member of the All Girl band, The Melodears. She went on to become a successful songwriter, her songs included "I'll Never Smile Again", written after her husband died. The song was later covered by many artists, including Frank Sinatra, his first great hit while with Dorsey; and The Ink Spots. Also she composed the Frank Sinatra hit "Put Your Dreams Away", Frank's 'signature' song, which was played at his funeral. In 1982, the year after she died, Ruth was inducted into the American Music Hall of Fame with an honorary Grammy Award

in 1983 - Spencer Chamberlain (US vocalist; Underoath/This Runs Through) is born

in 1986 - Phil Lynott dies at age 36. Irish singer, bassist, songwriter, composer, founder member of Thin Lizzy; he released two solo albums and also formed and fronted the band Grand Slam. Born in West Bromwich, England, but when Phil was four years old, he went to live with his grandmother Sarah in Crumlin, Dublin, while his mother stayed in Manchester. In the mid 1960s, he began singing in his first band, the Black Eagles. Around this time, he befriended Brian Downey, who was later persuaded to join the band. Before long the Black Eagles broke up and Phil joined 'Kama Sutra' before settling into a short stint singing in (Irish) Skid Row. In 1969, Phil and Brian Downey formed Thin Lizzy with guitarist Eric Bell and keyboard player Eric Wrixon. Phil was the main songwriter for Thin Lizzy, as well as the lead singer and bassist. Their first top ten hit was in 1973, with a rock version of the traditional Irish song "Whiskey in the Jar". In 1980, though Thin Lizzy were still enjoying considerable success, Phil launched a solo career with the album, Solo in Soho. In 1984, he formed a new band, Grand Slam, with Doish Nagle, Laurence Archer, Robbie Brennan, and Mark Stanway. His last single, "Nineteen", was released a few weeks before his death.
in 1990 - Vladimir Alexis Ussachevsky, composer known for his experiments with music for the tape recorder, and computer music, dies at 78.

in 1991 - Leo Wright dies at age 57. A first-rate bop-oriented alto saxophonist, clarinetist, he was also one of the finest flutists jazz, born in Wichita Falls, Texas. In the late 1950s he played with Charles Mingus, Kenny Burrell, Johnny Coles, Blue Mitchell and Dizzy Gillespie who in rhe 1960s he appeared at several major international festivals and made records including A Musical Safari. From the end of the 60s he lived in Europe where he played with various bands. In the mid-80s he performed and record with Nat Adderley, Kenny Drew, and his vocalist wife Elly, and led his own groups.

in 1992 - Simply Red went back to No.1 on the UK album chart for a five week run with 'Stars' making it the third time it had been at the top of the charts.

in 1994 - Rahul Dev Burman dies at age 54. Indian composer and actor born in Calcutta; he was famous for his unique, grunting bass singing style. He sang playback in 18 movies which he composed and he also acted in the film Bhoot Bungla '65 and Pyar Ka Mausam '67. Out of his 331 released movies 292 were in Hindi, 31 in Bangla, 3 in Telugu, 2 each in Tamil & Oriya and 1 in Marathi. He also composed for 5 TV Serials in Hindi and Marathi and scored a large number of non-film songs in Bangla aka Pooja songs or modern songs, which are available in different albums.
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in 1995 - Eduardo Mata dies at age 52. Mexican conductor and composer; born in Mexico City, he studied guitar privately for 3 years before attending the National Conservatory of Music. He composed several works in the 50s and 60s, including 3 symphonies, chamber works, sonatas, and works for ballet. His 3rd symphony and some chamber works have been recorded. In 1965 he was appointed head of the Music Department of the National Autonomous University of Mexico and conductor of the Guadalajara Orchestra. From '77 to '93 he was music director of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and guest conductor of several famous orchestras in the US, Europe and Latin America. He recorded over fifty albums, most of them with the UNAM Symphony Orchestra, Dallas Symphony Orchestra, and London Symphony Orchestra (Eduardo and a passenger were en route from Cuernavaca, Morelos, to Dallas, Texas; he was piloting his own Piper Aerostar. One engine failed shortly after takeoff, the plane crashed during an emergency landing attempt
in 1995 - Leonard Hirsch, violinist, teacher and conductor, leader of the RAF Symphony Orchestra, and conductor of the BBC - Empire Orchestra, dies at 92.

in 1996 - Ramón Vinay dies at age 84. Chilean operatic tenor born in Chillán, Chile, probably best remembered for his appearances in the title role of Giuseppe Verdi's tragic opera Otello. His overall tenor repertoire embraced heavy Wagnerian roles, he sang at the Bayreuth Festival in 1952-57, as well as Canio in Leoncavallo's Pagliacci, Don José in Bizet's Carmen and Samson in Saint-Saëns's Samson et Dalila. Apart from Iago, the baritone parts which he performed included Telramund, Bartolo, Falstaff and Scarpia

in 1998 - John Gary dies at age 66. American pop vocalist; considered by many to be one of the best crooners due to his extaordinary breath control and tonal quality of his voice. He had an exceptionally wide range of 3 octaves. He sang in movies, on Broadway, had his own TV show, and appeared at Carnegie Hall, with numerous symphonies. He appeared 30 times as a guest on The Tonight Show with Jack Paar, Steve Allen and Johnny Carson. He traveled across the U.S. and Canada with around 40 concerts per year. For six years he gave Community concerts in over 400 cities and towns. John recorded 23 albums for RCA Victor Records. His 1967 single "Cold", r was his most successful, topping the billboard easy listening chart for two weeks

in 2001 - Les Brown dies at age 88. American big band leader and composer, best known for his nearly seven decades of work with his group Les Brown and His Band of Renown from 1938 to 2001. Before which he graduated from New York Military Academy in 1932, Les attended college at Duke University from 1932-1936. There he led the group Les Brown and His Blue Devils, performing regularly on campus and up and down the east coast. The first feature length film that Les and the band appeared in was the war-time movie "Seven Days Leave". "Rock-A-Billy Baby", in 1957, was their second movie and in 1963, they appeared in Jerry Lewis' comedy The Nutty Professor. Les and his band were also the house band for the Steve Allen show from 1959-1961 and the Dean Martin Variety Show from 1963-1972. They performed with virtually every major performer of their time, including Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald and Nat "King" Cole.
Video Notes: SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY ~Doris Day ~ Les Brown & his Orchestra ~Columbia Records ~1944. With the exception of, possibly, Glenn Miller's IN THE MOOD and a few others, SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY stands out as one of the most remembered songs of the war years. By the end of 1945, the war was coming to an end & husbands, boyfriends, etc. would be returning home and SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY reflected the feelings of millions across the United States.
in 2001 - Rapper Vanilla Ice spends night in jail after allegedly ripping out some of his wife's hair during a row.

in 2001 - Courtney Love filed a lawsuit against her alleged stalker claiming that Lesley Barber, the ex-wife of her current boyfriend Jim Barber, drove over her foot. This had forced her to forfeit her role in a forthcoming film and lost her the £200,000, ($340,000) fee that went with it.

in 2001 - Madame Tussaud's waxworks in London revealed that Oasis singer Liam Gallagher had come third in 'The Most Hated Characters' list of exhibits, behind Adolf Hitler and Slobodan Milosevic.

in 2001 - US rapper Vanilla Ice spent the night in jail after allegedly ripping out some of his wife’s hair. Ice (born Robert Van Winkle) told police he pulled out some of his wife's hair to prevent her from jumping out of their truck's window. He was released the following morning from Broward County Jail in Fort Lauderdale on $3,500 bail.

in 2003 - Yfrah Neaman OBE dies at age 79. Lebonese violinist and an eminent pedagogue born in Sidon; he studied in Paris and then settled in London where he continued his studies with Carl Flesch and Max Rostal. Yfrah gave the first performances in Britain of the violin concertos of Walter Piston in 1952 and Roberto Gerhard in 1955. He taught at the Guildhall School of Music and was artistic director of the Carl Flesch Competition. Among his students were Krzysztof Smietana, David Takeno, Wolfgang David, Sung-Sic Yang, Gennady Filimonov, Mihai Craioveanu, and Radoslaw Szulc. Yfrah was awarded the Order of the British Empire in 1983

in 2004 - Jake Hess dies at age 76. American 4 time Grammy Award-winning gospel singer and founder of The Imperials. He began his career at the age of 16, when he joined the John Daniel Quartet, making his recorded debut on "Just a Prayer Away". After which, he sang with three of his brothers as the Hess Brothers Quartet. He also sang with the Sunny South Quartet and their rival, the Melody Masters Quartet. From 1948 until 1963 Jake sang lead with the Statesmen Quartet. Upon leaving the Statesmen Quartet, Jake formed the Imperials, they went on to become pioneers in Contemporary Christian Music, and would eventually be inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame. Elvis Presley had long harbored a love for gospel and Jake Hess in particular. The group recorded with Elvis in sessions from May 1966 to June 1971. This included his last two Grammy Award-winning albums: How Great Thou Art, featuring a duet with Jake on the classic Statesmen song "If The Lord Wasn’t Walking By My Side" and He Touched Me, which used many of the songs that the Imperials had recorded on their own albums.
in 2004 - Britney Spears had her surprise marriage annulled less than 55 hours after tying the knot at the Little White Wedding Chapel in Las Vegas with childhood friend Jason Alexander. The couple married on Saturday morning, during a night out in Las Vegas, but immediately her lawyers filed for an annulment, saying Spears 'lacked understanding of her actions to the extent that she was incapable of agreeing to the marriage.'

in 2005 - The owner of a recording studio where Eminem recorded his 'Slim Shady' LP was found shot dead. AJ Abdallah, who was 36, was discovered by a business colleague at the Detroit studio, it was thought he had been dead for at least two days. Police suggested that a robbery may also have taken place. Mr Abdallah had lived in a apartment above the studio on Eight Mile Road, the Detroit street which inspired the title of Eminem's 2002 film '8 Mile.'

in 2006 - The house where Johnny Cash lived for 35 years was bought by Bee Gees singer Barry Gibb. The rustic house near Nashville, Tennessee went on the market in June 2005 with an asking price of $2.9m (£1.7m). Gibb said he planned to preserve the house to honour the Cash memory. Unfortunately Gibb’s ownership of the house was short-lived. In April 2007, the house burned to the ground. Gibb was having the house renovated when a flammable spray sealer caused fire to break out during construction.

in 2007 - Nikki Bacharach the daughter of songwriter Burt Bacharach and actress Angie Dickinson committed suicide by suffocation using a plastic bag and helium. She had suffered from Asperger's disorder. 40 year old Nickki who was the couple's only child died at her home in California.

in 2008 - Beyonce won a long-running legal wrangle over claims her hit song ‘Baby Boy’ infringed the copyright of another artist's work. The appeals court in Houston, Texas upheld a 2006 decision which dismissed musician Jennifer Armour's claims that its lyrics were based on her work. Ms Armour claimed she had posted 'I Got A Little Bit Of Love For You' to Beyonce's manager and record company in early 2003.

in 2008 - Britney Spears was carried out of her home on a stretcher and taken into custody after police were called in a dispute involving her children. Police were called to Spears' home over a family custodial dispute that they tried to resolve, after nearly three hours, Spears handed over her children, two-year-old Sean Preston and one-year-old Jayden James, to her ex-husband Kevin Federline.

in 2008 - Keith Baxter dies at age 36. British drummer; in 1990, he was a founder member of folk metal pioneers Skyclad, releasing their debut album 'The Wayward Sons of Mother Earth' in 1991. After a tour with Overkill they recorded their follow-up album 'A Burnt Offering for the Bone Idol' in 1992. He recorded 3 more albums with them before leaving in 1995 to move to London where he joined '3CR'/'3 Colours Red'. Their 1997 debut album "Pure" was follFollowing the band split in 1999 he formed the band Elevation with former bandmate, Pete Vuckovic. The following year he moved back to his hometown of Lancaster and briefly played with the Nth.Irish band, Therapy in 2002. Following 3 Colours Red's reformation and second split, Kieth played with Lancaster-based Baby Judas .

in 2009 - Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant was voted the Greatest Voice In Rock by listeners of radio station Planet Rock. Plant beat Queen's Freddie Mercury, Free's Paul Rodgers and Deep Purple's Ian Gillan to the top spot in the UK poll.

in 2010 - MP3 players given as presents helped boost UK single sales to an all-time high in the week after Christmas. According to Official Charts Company figures, 4.22m singles were sold in the last week of 2009, beating the previous record of 4.03m over Christmas 2008. The Christmas chart battle between X Factor and Rage Against the Machine had helped boost sales.

in 2010 - Sandro de América Roberto Sánchez dies at age 64. Argentinian singer, guitarist and actor born in Buenos Aires, learning and playing Romani guitar as a child. In the 1960s he started the group Sandro & los de Fuego, which gained popularity on the TV show Sábados Circulares and had hits with songs like Trigal, Tengo, ¿A esto le llamas amor?, Eres el demonio disfrazado, Porque yo te amo and Rosa, Rosa. He was the first Latino singer to fill Madison Square Garden doing so five times during the 1970s. He was also the first singer to do a television concert via satellite, the concert was broadcast from Madison Square Garden in April 1970. This concert marked the debut of Latino music for a world audience. Sandro also appeared in various films, among others: Quiero Llenarme de Ti ("I Want to fill myself with you") and telenovelas, including Fue sin Querer/"It wasn't on purpose" (died from complications after having heart and lung transplant surgery)
in 2010 - Tony Clarke dies at age 68. British musician and record producer born in Coventry started his musical career playing bass guitar in skiffle bands in the mid 1950s, and in rock bands into the early 1960s. At this time he also worked as a session musician for Decca Records, but in 1964 he transferred to the production department. He also worked as a songwriter; his tune "Our Song" was recorded by Malcolm Roberts and Jack Jones. His first production was with Pinkerton's Colours No.8 hit "Mirror, Mirror", soon followed by The Equals's No.1 hit "Baby Come Back" as well as writing "The Guy Who Made Her A Star" for the band. In 1966 he was given The Moody Blues, and produced what became their 1967 symphonic rock album "Days of Future Passed" which included the now classic track, "Nights in White Satin", it was also the first album to feature Justin Hayward and John Lodge. Tony produced The Four Tops for a UK-only release in 1972, which was comprised entirely of songs written by the Moody Blues. He stayed with Moody Blues till their 1978 comeback album, Octave, earning the name "the Sixth Moody" from friends and fans. He went on to produce a number of film soundtracks and produced the likes of the Irish folk rock outfit Clannad, Yes man Rick Wakeman, and Nicky Hopkins, among others.

in 2011 - Mick Karn/Andonis Michaelides dies at age 52. Cypriot-born British bass guitarist, saxophonist and keyboardist born in Nicosia; in 1961, his family emigrated to London, England, where he was educated at Catford Boys' School. He and his friends formed the New Wave group, Japan in 1974 and achieved success in the late '70s and '80s, when they were often associated with the burgeoning New Romantic fashion movement. They debuted with their '78 album Adolescent Sex, followed up with Obscure Alternatives, both albums acheiving success outside the UK . Their next 5 albums all charted in the UK, the last being Rain Tree Crow in 1991, when they briefly reformed for this one-off project, and their final album. After Japan broke up, he recorded a solo album before forming Dalis Car with Peter Murphy of the gothic post-punk group Bauhaus, who recorded one album in 1984. In the 90s he worked with artist David Torn and a number of Japanese musicians, and formed the multinational New Wave band, NiNa. Since then Mick has worked as a solo artist and as a sculptor and photographer. He has also played on recordings by other artists, contributing bass guitar and saxophone to Gary Numan's Dance album, and played with Kate Bush and Joan Armatrading (sadly died from cancer) b. July 24th 1958.

in 2011 - Tavo Kupinski dies at age 36. Argentine left-hander guitarist and founding member of the rock band Los Piojos formed in 1988. In 1991, they headed to Europe to participate in an anti-racist music festival in France, playing with groups from Mali, Burkina Faso, Cuba, and Spain. He recorded eleven albums with the band, but in 2009, when the internal crisis started he moved on as reinforcement of Las Pelotas band; also along with Paul Guerra, Sebastián Cardero and Changuito Gómez Farías, he formed the rock band Revealados (tragically Tavo died along with his wife in a car crash)
in 2011 - Gerry Rafferty dies at age 63. Scottish singer-songwriter and guitarist born in Paisley, near Glasgow best known for his hits "Right Down the Line" and "Baker Street". In 1963 he left St Mirin's Academy and had several jobs while playing in a local group, the Mavericks. In 1966 Gerry and his old school friend Joe Egan released a single, "Benjamin Day"/"There's Nobody Here", as members of The Fifth Column. He then joined Billy Connolly in a folk band The Humblebums, recording 2 albums with Billy, 'The New Humblebums' and 'Open Up the Door'. It was Gerry who urged Connolly to go it alone as a comic, after which Gerry recorded a first solo album, 'Can I Have My Money Back'. (died from long time chronic liver and kidney illnesses)

in 2011 - Grady Chapman dies at age 81. American doo-wop singer; born in Greenville, South Carolina, he joined The Robins in 1952, singing alongside Bobby Nunn, Billy Richards, Roy Richards, Ty Terrell, and later Carl Gardner. During that time, the Robins recorded for RCA, and later Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller's LA based "Spark" label. In 1958, he wrote "Sweet Pea" for Bob and Earl. Grady would later become a member of one of the the Coasters' many spin-off groups, The Coasters Mark II, which included Bobby Nunn, Bobby Sheen, and Billy Richards, Jr. In 1977, along with Billy Guy and Jerome Evans, he sang on "Paid The Price" on Michelle Phillips' album Victim Of Romance. He would also substitute for Carl Gardner a few times in the 1990s and 2000s with The Coasters. He still performed as Grady Chapman & The Robins, until his death (heart failure)
in 2011 - Jeff Jacobs dies at age 41. American trumpeter and keyboardist, and a member of the San Francisco spaghetti-Western-jazz ensemble The Drift. Over the years they have toured in Europe, Japan, Canada, and the United States and has produced multiple recordings (cancer).

4 JANUARY
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Old January 5th, 2013, 05:18 AM   #1825

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5 January
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in 1560 - William Cobbold, composer is born.
in 1596 - Henry Lawes, English composer is born.

in 1643 - Juan Bautista Comes, Spanish composer, dies at Valencia.
He was a choirboy at Valencia Cathedral (1594-96) and a pupil of Juan Perez. After serving as maestro de capilla at Lerida Cathedral (1605-08), he returned to Valencia and was vice-maestro at the Patriarca (1608-13) and maestro de capilla at the Cathedral (1613-18). He was vice-maestro at the Royal Chapel in Madrid (1618-28) before returning to Valencia, where he was again vice-maestro at the Patriarca (1628-32) and maestro de capilla at the Cathedral (1632-38). About 200 of his works are extant, mainly sacred. - Born at Valencia, 1582.

in 1649 - Francesco Cavalli's opera "Giasone," premieres in Venice.
in 1661 - Jacob Balthasar Schutz, violinist, singer and composer of baroque chamber music, is born.

in 1679 - Pietro Filippo Scarlatti, son of Alessandro, baroque composer, organist and choirmaster, is born. P. F. Scarlatti, unlike his father, only composed one opera (Clitarco), and the score for it has been lost.

in 1710 - Friedrich Wilhelm Reidt, composer is born.
in 1740 - Antonio Lotti, Italian opera composer, dies at about 72.
in 1746 - Anton Simon Ignaz Praelisauer, composer, dies at 53.

in 1778 - Fortunato Santini, composer and collector of musical scores, is born. The Santini Collection, comprising approximately 4,500 manuscripts and 1,100 printed editions, contains the only known versions of several scores. It's presently the property of the Diocesan Library of Münster.

in 1783 - Friedrich Wilhelm Reidt, composer, dies on 73rd birthday.
in 1788 - Kaspar Ett, organist and composer of church music, is born.
in 1788 - Johann Schneider, composer, dies at 85.
in 1810 - Auguste Mermet, opera composer, is born.

in 1814 - Johann Gottfried Krebs, organist and composer (both his father, Johann Ludwig Krebs, and his grandfather, Johann Tobias Krebs had followed the same professions), dies at 72.

in 1823 - William Rockstro, composer, arranger and musicologist, friend of Felix Mendelssohn, is born.
in 1835 - Friedrich Richard Faltin, organist and composer, is born.
in 1848 - Ferdinando Orlandi, teacher and composer of operas, dies at 73.

in 1857 - David (Scull) Bispham, American baritone, is born at Philadelphia. He first sang as an amateur in church choruses in Philadelphia. In 1886 he went to Italy, where he studied with Vannuccini in Florence and Francesco Lamperti in Milan; later studied in London with Shakespeare and Randegger. He made his operatic debut as Longueville in Messager's La Basoche (English Opera House, London, Nov. 3, 1891), in which his comic acting ability, as well as his singing, won praise. He made his first appearance in serious opera as Kurwenal in Tristan und Isolde (Drury Lane, June 25,1892). He was particularly effective in the Wagnerian baritone roles; made his American debut with the Metropolitan Opera in N.Y. as Beckmesser (Nov. 18, 1896), and was on the Metropolitan roster 1896-97, 1898-99, and 1900-03. He was a strong advocate of opera in English. A Society of American Singers was organized under his guidance, presenting light operas in the English language. He published an autobiography, A Quaker Singer's Recollections (N.Y., 1920). A Bispham Memorial Medal Award was established by the Opera Society of America in 1921 for an opera in English by an American composer. - Died at N.Y., Oct. 2, 1921.

in 1862 - Joseph Frohlich, composer, dies at 81.

in 1871 - Frederick Shepherd Converse, late romantic classical composer, is born. His opera, "The Pipe of Desire," was the first American work ever to be performed at the Metropolitan Opera in New York.

in 1875 - Charles Garnier's new Opera opens in Paris.
in 1880 - Nicolai Karlovich Medtner, pianist and composer, friend of Sergei Rachmaninoff, is born.
in 1881 - Nikolay Andreyevich Roslavets, composer is born.
in 1888 - Henri Herz, pianist and composer, dies one day short of his 85th birthday.

in 1891 - Emma Abbott, American soprano, dies at Salt Lake City. She was a pupil of her father, a singer and music teacher. After vocal training from Achille Errani in N.Y., she sang with Chapin's choir there (1870-72). She then pursued vocal studies in Milan with Sangiovanni and in Paris with Marchesi, Wartel, and Delle Sedie. On May 2,1876, she made her professional debut as Maria in La Fille du regiment at London's Covent Garden. On Feb. 8, 1877, she made her U.S. debut in the same role in N.Y. From 1878 she toured with her own company in the U.S. giving performances of operas and operettas in English. She made a habit of interpolating hymns into her performances of operas by Bellini and Donizetti as a specialty. - Born at Chicago, Dec. 9, 1850.

in 1893 - Friedrich Blume, eminent German musicologist and editor, is born at Schluchtern, Jan. 5,1893.
He was the son of a Prussian government functionary. He first studied medicine in Eisenach; in 1911 he went to the University of Munich, where he began musicological studies; then went to the univsity of Leipzig and Berlin. During World War I, he served in the German army; he was taken prisoner by the British and spent 3 years in a prison camp in England.

In 1919 he resumed his studies at the University of Leipzig, where he took his Ph.D. in 1921 with the dissertation Studien zur Vorgeschichte der Orchestersuite im 15. und 16. Jahrhundert (published in Leipzig, 1925); in 1923 he became a lecturer in music at the University of Berlin; in 1925 he completed his Habilitation there with Das monodische Prinzip in der protestantischen Kirchenmusik (published in Leipzig, 1925); was made Privatdozent there that same year; also lectured in music history at the Berlin-Spandau School of Church Music from 1928 to 1934.

In 1934 he joined the faculty of the University of Kiel, where he was professor from 1938 until his retirement in 1958; was then made professor emeritus. In 1952 he was made a corresponding member of the American Musicological Society. Blume was an authority on Lutheran church music; his Die evangelische Kirchenmusik was published in Bucken's Handbuch der Musikwissenschaft, X (1931; 2nd ed., rev., as Geschichte der evangelischen Kirchenmusik, 1965; Eng. tr., 1974, as Protestant Church Music: A History). He prepared a collected edition of the works of M. Praetorius (21 vols., Berlin, 1928-31); was general editor of Das Chorwerk, a valuable collection of early polyphonic music (1929-38); also edited of Das Erbe deutscher Musik (1935-43).

In 1943 he was entrusted with the preparation of the monumental encyclopedia Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart (14 vols., Kassel, 1949-68); following its publication, he undertook the further task of preparing an extensive supplement, which contained numerous additional articles and corrections; its publication was continued after his death by his daughter, Ruth Blume.

He also wrote Wesen und Werden deutscher Musik (Kassel, 1944); Johann Sebastian Bach im Wandel der Geschichte (Kassel, 1947; Eng. tr., 1950, as Two Centuries of Bach)', Goethe und die Musik (Kassel, 1948); Was ist Musik? (Kassel, 1959); Umrisse eines neuen Bach-Bildes (Kassel, 1962). His life's work was a study in the practical application of his vast erudition and catholic interests in musicological scholarship. - Died at Schluchtern, Nov. 22, 1975.

in 1895 - Elizabeth Cotten (US blues/folk guitarist, singer, songwriter) is born.
in 1896 - Isaac Albeniz' opera "Pepita Jiminez," premieres in Barcelona.

in 1897 - Theo Mackeben "Red Roberts," "John Morris," pianist, conductor, bandleader and composer, is born. Mackeben conducted the premier of der Dreigroschenoper (Three Penny Opera).

in 1902 - Pierre Palla, pianist, organist, conductor and arranger, known for his long career as a performer on radio in the Netherlands, is born.

in 1903 - Leighton Lucas, composer and conductor known for his film scores (The Dam Busters), is born.
in 1903 - Tel‚sforo A Palm, Curacao, composer/pianist is born.

in 1906 - Wild Bill (actually, William Edward) Davison, jazz cornetist, band leader, is born at Defiance, Ohio. His parents died when he was very young; he was raised by his grandparents, the town librarians. He began on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and then switched to mellophone and cornet. He worked in local groups the Ohio Lucky Seven and James Jackson's Band, then with Roland Potter's players in Cincinnati. He joined the Chubb-Steinberg Orch., which recorded in April 1924.

This band was subsequently jointly led by Art Hicks and Paul Orner, and as the Orner-Hicks Orch. it played in N.Y. in early 1926. Wild Bill left the band, returned to his home town, then joined Seattle Harmony Kings, and traveled to Chicago with them. He worked mostly in and around Chicago during the five- year period 1927-32, including a long spell with Benny Meroff, also worked with Charles Dornberger and Ray Miller, etc.

He came under the influence of the young generation of Chicago musicians, and was particularly impressed by the playing of Louis Armstrong. In late 1931, he began organizing his own big band. After intensive rehearsals the band worked briefly at Guyon's. Davison's Chicago career was cut short in 1932 by a car accident that killed his fellow bandmember, Frank Teschemacher (Some have blamed Davison for Teschemacher's death).

He moved to Milwaukee and worked there for most of the time between 1933 and 1941, leading his own small groups at various clubs including East Side Spa and Schmitz's, and also worked for other leaders, including Charles "Murph" Podolsky. During these eight years Wild Bill occasionally doubled on valve trombone. He overcame a lip injury in 1939 caused when a fan flung a beer mug at his face.

He moved to N.Y. in the spring of 1941, and led his own band at several small clubs. Dancer Katherine Dunham launched a revue during 1943 which included a recreation of the Original Jazz Band; Davison was enlisted for the group. This resulted in a 1944 recording session and paved the way for a switch from a Chicago-style approach to a New Orleans-traditional approach. He served in the army from 1943-mid-1945, and then worked with Art Hodes and led his own band in St. Louis, before becoming a regular at Eddie Condon's Club from December 1945 in N.Y. He toured Britain with Eddie Condon in February 1957.

Davison moved to the West Coast in 1960, where he played at the 400 Club, Los Angeles. Through the 1960s, he alternated between touring with his own bands and working with other Dixieland-revival groups. He was very popular in Europe, and spent the early 1970s living in Denmark. He was back to working at Condon's club from 1975-85, while continuing to tour with various ensembles. Davison continued to play and record through the end of his life. - Died at Santa Barbara, Calif., Nov. 14, 1989.

in 1910 - Erica Morini, Vienna Austria, concert violinist is born.
in 1915 - Uta Graf, singer/teacher is born.

in 1917 - Reginald Smith Brindle, composer, multi-instrumentalist and musicologist, is born. Brindle served in WWII as a sapper, and is best known for his works for solo guitar.

in 1917 - Wieland Wagner, opera director and grandson of Richard Wagner, is born. W. Wagner is credited as the originator of Regietheater.

in 1919 - Severino Gazzelloni (Italian flautist) is born.
in 1920 - Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, Brescia Italy, pianist is born.

in 1923 - Sam Phillips, record producer (Sun Records, Memphis Recording Service), is born. Phillips is credited with discovering Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash and played an important role in the emergence of rock and roll.
in 1925 - Bruno Amaducci, Swiss conductor, is born at Lugano.
He studied at the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris and at the Milan Conservatory; then toured widely as an opera and symphony conductor in Europe, and also appeared in North America. On Oct. 5, 1967, he made his Metropolitan Opera debut in N.Y. conducting Falstaff. He became closely associated with the Orchestra della Radiotelevisione della Svizzera Italiana in Lugano, where he was active as a conductor and later as chief of music programming.

in 1926 - Victor Emanuel Bendix, Danish pianist and conductor, brother of Otto Bendix, dies at Copenhagen. He studied at the Copenhagen Conservatory with Gade and J.P.E. Hartmann, and also took piano lessons with Liszt in Weimar. Returning to Copenhagen, he was appointed to the piano faculty of the Royal Academy of Music. In 1897 he organized the Copenhagen Philharmonic Concerts and conducted them for many years. He wrote four symphonies in a Romantic vein, a Piano Concerto, and much choral music. - Born at Copenhagen, May 17, 1851.

in 1926 - John Joseph "Jack" Brokensha (Australian/US jazz vibraphonist; Australian Jazz Quartet) is born.
in 1929 - Wilbert Harrison, pop and R&B singer, guitarist, pianist and harmonica player, is born.
in 1930 - Frederick Charles Tillis, jazz and classical composer and saxophonist, is born.
in 1930 - Richard Hayes, Passaic NJ, singer/emcee (Name That Tune) is born.

in 1931 - Alfred Brendel, great Austrian pianist, is born at Wiesenberg, Jan. 5,1931.
He studied in Zagreb with S. Dezelic (piano, 1937-43) and F. Dugan (harmony), and in Graz with L Kaan (piano, 1943-47) and A. Michl (composition). He pursued his training in piano with P. Baumgartner in Basel, and also attended the master classes of E. Fischer in Lucerne and E. Seuermann in Salzburg.

In 1947 he was awarded his state diploma in Vienna, and in 1948 he made his formal debut in Graz. He captured 4th prize in the Busoni competition in Bolzano in 1949. His appearances at the Vienna and Salzburg Festivals in 1960 were noteworthy and led to frequent engagements there and at other major festivals.

In 1962 he garnered critical acclaim when he gave a complete cycle of the Beethoven piano sonatas in London, a cycle he repeated there (1977; 1982-83; 1992-95). He also gave the cycle in Vienna (1965; 1982-83), Rome (1970), Amsterdam, Paris, and Berlin (1982-83), N.Y. (1983), and in 14 European and 4 North American cities (1992-96). Brendel settled in London in 1974.

As a soloist, he was engaged by many of the foremost conductors and orchs. of his time, and he also was active as a chamber music artist. In 1983 his series of master classes appeared on BBC TV in London. He gave a series of Schubert recitals throughout Europe and North America in 1987-88. In 1991 he was soloist in Beethoven's Choral Fantasy at the gala concert celebrating the centenary of N.Y.'s Carnegie Hall. Brendel was the first to record all of Beethoven's piano music, for which he was awarded the Grand Prix du Disque of France in 1965. He also won numerous other recording prizes.

Among his many other honors were membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1984), Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres of France (1985), honorary knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II of England (1989), Orden pour le Merite fur Wissenschaften und Kiinste of Germany (1991), and the Gold Medal of the Royal Philharmonic Society of London (1993). In his interpretations, Brendel has combined intellectual discernment and refined expression in his mastery of the Viennese classical tradition.

In addition to his remarkable performances of Beethoven and Schubert, he has also demonstrated penetrating insights into the works of Bach, Mozart, and Liszt. His interests also include Stravinsky, Bartok, and Schoenberg. Brendel is also an engaging and often witty writer. In addition to his contributions to various periodicals, he has publ. the books Musical Thoughts and Afterthoughts (1976; 2nd ed., 1982), Music Sounded Out: Essays, Lectures, Interviews, Afterthoughts (1990), Fingerzeig (1996), and Storendes Lachen wahrend des Jaworts (1997).

in 1932 - Johnny Adams (US soul singer) is born.

in 1937 - Jimmy (James) Amadie, jazz pianist, educator, is born at Philadelphia. Beginning in the late 1950s, Amadie jammed regularly around Philadelphia, and worked with Mel Torme (recording with him in 1963), Woody Herman, Red Rodney, and Charlie Ventura. He was, for a time, house pianist at the Red Hill Inn in Pennsauken, N.J., where leading names played, and in 1960 he led the house trio at N.Y.'s Copacabana. But having begun the piano relatively late in life, Amadie engaged in a practice regimen so intense—he claims up to 80 hours a week—that he seriously injured his hands with tendinitis, eventually undergoing four operations for reconstructive surgery. He couldn't touch the instrument between 1967 and 1995, and even today can only play for a few minutes at a time, every few weeks. Only by making first takes less than once a month over the course of 18 months was he able to complete his first solo recording, which was released in 1995. Steve Allen has written a lyric to the title track, "Always with Me." Amadie has also composed and conducted music for National Football League Films. He composes and writes his self-published books by dictating them. For his books he developed a harmonic approach based on his system for creating chord voices, and a melodic approach based on tension and release, which he uses to integrate modal, tonal, and bi-tonal playing. A short film about Amadie was shown on CBS News Sunday Morning on April 13, 1997.

in 1940 - Atholl Guy, pop, folk bassist (The Seekers), is born.
in 1940 - George Malone (second tenor; Monotones) is born.

in 1941 - Grady Thomas, doo wop and funk singer (Parliament, Funkadelic), member of the Rock and roll Hall of Fame, is born.

in 1942 - Maurizio Pollini, classical pianist, is born.
in 1944 - Jo Ann Kelly (US blues singer, acoustic guitarist) is born
in 1946 - "Crazy Barret Diamond" Syd, rocker (Pink Floyd) is born
in 1948 - Thom Mooney, rock drummer (Nazz), is born.
in 1949 - George Brown, rock and jazz drummer (Kool and the Gang), is born.
in 1949 - Chris Stein, Bkln, rock guitarist (Blondie-Heart of Glass, Call Me) is born.
in 1951 - Peter 'Biff' Byford (UK lead singer; Saxon) is born
in 1953 - Steve Archer (US singer; The Archers) is born
in 1954 - Bryan Hitt, rock drummer (REO Speedwagon), is born.
in 1957 - Vincent Calloway, pop and R&B singer/songwriter and record producer, is born.

in 1956 - Mistinguett Jeanne Bourgeois dies at age 80. French vaudeville performer born in Enghien-les-Bains, Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France. She began as a flower seller in a restaurant in her home town, singing popular ballads as she sold her flowers. Jeanne made her debut as Mistinguett at the Casino de Paris in 1895, and also appeared in shows as the Folies Bergère, Moulin Rouge, and Eldorado. Her risqué routines captivated Paris and she went on to become the most popular French entertainers of her time and the highest paid female entertainer in the world. In 1919 her legs were insured for the then astounding amount of 500,000 francs. She first recorded her signature song 'Mon Homme' in 1916. During a tour of the America, she was asked by Time magazine to explain her popularity. Her answer was: "It is a kind of magnetism. I say 'Come closer' and draw them to me."
in 1953 - Rick Ambrose, rock singer (Jewel), is born.
in 1960 - Phil Thornalley (UK songwriter/vocals/guitar; Cure) is born
in 1961 - Iris Dement (country singer/songwriter) is born.

in 1961 - The Beatles played at Litherland Town Hall, Liverpool. In the audience are two members from Rory Storm & the Hurricanes: Johnny Guitar and Ringo Starr who have just returned from Hamburg, Germany.

in 1962 - Tony Sheridan and Beatles produce "My Bonnie" and "The Saints"
in 1963 - Grant Young (US drummer; Soul Asylum) is born
in 1964 - Ted Harris Poley, rock singer/songwriter and drummer (Danger Danger), is born.
in 1965 - Kelly Nickels, rock bassist and singer (Faster Pussycat), is born.
in 1965 - Randy Thurman (US guitarist, artist, poet, composer). is born
in 1966 - Kate Schellenbach, rock drummer and singer (Beastie Boys, Luscious Jackson), is born.
in 1966 - The Who appeared on a new UK television program 'The Whole Scene Going.'
in 1967 - Pink Floyd appeared at The Marquee Club, London, England.

in 1967 - During The Beatles Sgt Pepper sessions at Abbey Road in London, Paul McCartney recorded his vocal track on 'Penny Lane.'

5 January
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Old January 5th, 2013, 05:21 AM   #1826

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in 1968 - DJ Bobo Peter René Cipiriano Baumann (Swiss singer, songwriter, dancer, music producer) is born.

in 1968 - Jimi Hendrix was jailed for one day in Stockholm, Sweden on drink charges after going berserk and destroying everything in his room at the Goteberg Hotel.

in 1969 - Brian Hugh Warner "Marilyn Manson," rock singer/songwriter, guitarist, keyboardist, drummer, pan flautist, is born.

in 1970 - Roberto Gerhard, avant-garde classical composer, musical scholar, writer and collector of folksongs, dies at 73.

in 1871 - Frederick Shepherd Converse, distinguished American composer and teacher, is born at Newton, Mass. After graduating from Harvard Universoty (1893), he studied music in Boston with Carl Baermann and Chadwick (1894-96), then in Munich at the Royal Academy of Music with Rheinberger (graduated, 1898). Returning to Boston, he taught harmony at the New England Conservatory of Music (1900-1902; 1920-36; dean, 1931-37) and was a composition instructor at Harvard University (1901-07). He received a Mus.Doc. from Boston University (1933); became a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters (1937). His early works reflect the influence of academic German training; later he began to apply more advanced harmonies; in his Flivver 10 Million, written to glorify the 10 millionth Ford car, he adopted a frankly modern idiom, modeled after Honegger's Pacific 231. He sketched some material for a fifth Symphony in 1937, but did not complete it. He renumbered his symphonies in 1936, calling his previously unnumbered Symphony No. 1 and upping Nos. 1, 2, and 3 by one, giving the title of Symphony No.5 to the undeveloped sketches for that work. But his Symphonies. Nos. 2, 3, and 4 were premiered, respectively, as Nos. 1, 2, and 3. - Died at Westwood, Mass., June 8, 1940.

in 1972 - Sakis Rouvas (Greek singer) is born.
in 1972 - David Bowie played two shows at Green's Playhouse, Glasgow, Scotland.

in 1973 - Bruce Springsteen released his debut album 'Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J.' Recorded in a single week the album only sold about 25,000 copies in the first year of its release. Both 'Blinded By The Light' and 'Spirit In The Night' were released as singles but neither made a dent in the charts. Manfred Mann's Earth Band later released a version of 'Blinded By The Light' on their album 'The Roaring Silence,' which reached #1 on the US charts in 1977.
in 1973 - Phil Joel (New Zealand bassist; Newsboys) is born.
in 1974 - John Drew Nichols, Okla, rocker (PC Quest-Can You See) is born.
in 1974 - The Carpenters went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'The Singles 1969-1973'.
in 1974 - Yes scored their first UK No.1 album with the double set 'Tales From The Topographic Oceans'.
in 1974 - Roy Bargy, orch leader (Jimmy Durante Show), dies at 79.
in 1976 - Georges E Migot, French composer, dies at 84.
in 1976 - Matt Wachter (US bassist; 30 Seconds to Mars) is born.

in 1976 - Mal Evans dies at age 40. English roadie; best known as the road manager, assistant, and a friend of The Beatles: John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr. In the early 1960s, Evans was employed as a telephone engineer, and also worked part-time as a bouncer at the Cavern Club, where The Beatles performed. Manager Brian Epstein later hired Evans as their assistant road manager, in tandem with Neil Aspinall. He contributed to many Beatle recordings, and appeared in some of the films they made. The Beatles stopped touring in 1966, but Mal carried on assisting the band and working with them in the studio. Mal enjoyed an executive position at Apple until 1969, when Allen Klein was hired as a manager to reorganise the whole company. Mal was fired by Klein the next year, because Klein complained to Lennon that Aspinall and Evans were "living like kings—like f***g emperors", although he was later reinstated after McCartney, Harrison and Starr complained. He produced several songs recorded by the Iveys/Badfinger in 1969 and 1970. The most notable of these is the song "No Matter What" by Badfinger, which charted on Billboard's Top 10 in December 1970. He also produced some tracks for Keith Moon's solo album Two Sides of the Moon and co-wrote "You and Me (Babe)" with George Harrison, which appears on Ringo's solo album, Ringo, in 1973. (Mal was shot dead by police at his LA apartment; he pointed a rifle at the police).

in 1978 - The Sex Pistols started a US tour in Atlanta, Georgia before an estimated audience of 500 people.

in 1979 - Charles Mingus dies at age 56. American jazz pianist, bassist and bandleader born at a US Army Base in Nogales, Arizona. His compositions retained the hot and soulful feel of hard bop and drew heavily from black gospel music while sometimes drawing on elements of Third stream, free jazz, and classical music. Many musicians passed through his bands and later went on to impressive careers. He recruited talented and sometimes little-known artists whom he assembled into unconventional and revealing configurations. As a performer, he was a pioneer in double bass technique and considered the heir apparent to Duke Ellington. Epitaph is considered to be one of Charles Mingus' masterpieces. The composition is 4,235 measures long, requires two hours to perform, and is one of the longest jazz pieces ever written. (Lou Gehrig's disease)
in 1979 - Prince made his live debut at the Capri Theatre, Minneapolis.
in 1980 - Donna Summer scored her third US No.1 album with 'On The Radio- Greatest Hits, Vol. 1 & II.'
in 1980 - KC and the Sunshine Band had their 5th US No.1 single and scored the first No.1 of the 80's when 'Please Don't Go' went to No.1 in the UK.

in 1983 - Everything But The Girl made their live debut at the ICA in London. (They took their name from a second-hand furniture store in Hull).

in 1985 - Michael Cuccione (Canadian actor, singer) is born
in 1986 - Teppei Koike (Japanese actor, singer) is born.

in 1987 - Alied Jones the young Welsh chorister announced his retirement from pop music at the age of 16, to study for his O level exams.

in 1988 – Pauline Pauline Vasseur (French singer) is born.

in 1989 - Winners in music weekly Melody Makers Readers Poll results, The Mission won best band, best live act, best single and best album. Morrissey won best male singer, Julianne Regan from All About Eve best female singer, worst LP went to Bros with 'Push' and best new band was won by House Of Love.

in 1990 - During a UK tour Paul McCartney appeared at The NEC Birmingham, England.

in 1991 - Iron Maiden went to No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Bring Your Daughter To The Slaughter.' It became the lowest selling No.1 since 1960, with just over 42,000 copies sold in its first week.

in 1991 - Madonna went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Justify My Love', a song co-written with Lenny Kravitz and No.2 hit in the UK.

in 1993 - Leonce Gras, singer and conductor of the Flemish Radio Choir, dies at 84.
in 1994 - Brian Johnston, cricketer (BBC radio commentator for 40 yrs), dies
in 1994 - Victor van Os, Dutch jazz guitarist, dies at 39
in 1995 - Francis Lopez, Fren dentist/operetta composer (Andalousie), dies at 78
in 1996 - Joseph Daniel White, singer/bandleader, dies at 84
in 1996 - Richard Versaille, tenor, dies at 63
in 1997 - Burton Lane Burton Levy dies at age 84. American composer and lyricist; best known for his Broadway musicals, "Finian's Rainbow" and "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever", He also wrote the music for the Broadway shows, Hold On to Your Hats, Laffing Room Only, Junior Miss, and Carmelina. He wrote music for many films such as Dancing Lady, Babes on Broadway, and Some Like it Hot. For a time, he was president of the American Guild of Authors and Composers, during which period he campaigned against music piracy. He also served three terms on the board of directors of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP). He is credited with discovering the 11-year-old Frances Gumm aka Judy Garland Lane's best-known songs include "Old Devil Moon," "How are Things In Glocca Morra?", "Too Late Now," "How About You?", and the title song from "On a Clear Day." He shared a Grammy Award in 1965 for Best Broadway Cast Album of the year "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever".
in 1997 - No Doubt went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'Tragic Kingdom.'

in 1998 - Ken Forssi bassist with Love died of brain cancer aged 55. Love scored the 1966 US No.33 single '7 And 7 Is', in 1968 UK No.24 album 'Forever Changes.'

in 1998 - Georgi Sviridov, neo-romantic classical composer, dies at 82.

in 1998 - Salvatore ''Sonny'' Bono dies at age 62. American record producer, singer, actor, and politician born in Detroit but attended Inglewood High School in Inglewood, California, but did not graduate. He began his music career working at Specialty Records where his song "Things You Do to Me" was recorded by Sam Cooke, and went on to work for the legendary record producer Phil Spector in the early 1960s as a promotion man, percussionist and "gofer". One of his earliest songwriting efforts was "Needles and Pins" which he co-wrote with Jack Nitzsche. Later in the same decade, he achieved commercial success, along with his then-wife Cher, as part of the singing duo Sonny and Cher. Bono wrote, arranged, and produced a number of hit records with singles like "I Got You Babe" and "The Beat Goes On". He also played a major part in Cher's early solo career with recordings such as "Bang Bang" and "You Better Sit Down Kids". Sonny later went into acting and politics (killed in a skiing accident at a resort near Lake Tahoe)

in 1998 - Ken Forssi dies at age 55. American bassist born in Florida; along with several Sarasota friends, he migrated to Anaheim, California in 1964, and began commuting to the school. At this time, his interest in music became much more intense, he learned new techniques very rapidly. Soon he got the position as bass player in a late-period lineup of The Surfaris, and touring Japan with the band. In 1965 he met Arthur Lee, who then had a band called "Grass Roots", Lee hired Ken as bassist, and they soon officially formed Love. Their music reflected different influences, combining elements of rock and roll, garage rock, folk and psychedelia. Ken can be heard on their first three albums. After Love his talent as a bassist gained him studio session work and offers to join various other rock groups. He played briefly with a band called "The Elves Themselves" and worked on a record with Jimi Hendrix. (brain tumor)
in 1999 - Marc Yu (US pianist, violist, celloist) is born

in 2001 - Kirsty MacColl was laid to rest at a private funeral ceremony, ahead of a public memorial to pay tribute to her life. The singer songwriter was killed in a boating accident on 18th Dec 2000.

in 2002 - UK Pop magazine Smash Hits listed the Best singles Of 2001 had Kylie Minogue at No.3 with 'Can't Get You Out Of My Head', No.2, Shaggy, 'It Wasn't Me' and at No.1 S Club 7 'Don't Stop Movin.'

in 2003 - Doreen Carwithen aka Mary Alwyn dies at age 80. British composer, born in Haddenham; she started both piano and violin at age 4. At age 16 she began composing by setting Wordsworth's I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud/Daffodils for voice and piano. In 1941 she entered the Royal Academy of Music and played the cello in a string quartet and with orchestras. She went on to write scores for over 30 films, including Harvest from the Wilderness in 1948; Boys in Brown -1950; Mantrap, released in the U.S. as Man in Hiding -1952; and East Anglian Holiday -1954. She also scored Elizabeth is Queen, the official film of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. Doreen also composed some orchestral music: an overture ODTAA/One Damn Thing After Another -1945; a Concerto for piano and strings -1948; the overture Bishop Rock -1952; a Suffolk Suite -1964 and two award-winning but little-known string quartets. In 1999 a stroke left her paralysed on one side

in 2003 - Canadian singer Avril Lavigne went to No.1 on the UK album chart with her debut release ‘Let Go.’

in 2003 - Green Day's lead singer Billie Joe Armstrong was arrested on suspicion of drunk driving after being stopped in California speeding in a black BMW convertible. He failed a breath test and was taken to Berkeley county jail and was later released on $1,053 (£657) bail.

in 2004 - Kinks singer Ray Davies was shot in the leg while on holiday in New Orleans. The 59-year-old singer-songwriter was shot when running after two men who stole his girlfriend's purse at gunpoint. Davies was admitted to the Medical Centre of Louisiana but his injuries were not considered serious. New Orleans police said one person had been arrested, and police were still searching for the second.

in 2005 - New York group Scissor Sisters had the UK's best-selling album of 2004 after overtaking Keane's sales on the last day of the year. Scissor Sisters' self-titled debut CD sold 1,594,259 copies in 2004 - 582 more than Keane's ‘Hopes and Fears.’ Robbie Williams' ‘Greatest Hits’ was the year's third biggest-seller, followed by Maroon 5, Katie Melua and Anastacia.

in 2005 - Danny Sugerman dies at age 50. US music manager; the second manager of the Los Angeles based rock band The Doors, and who wrote several books about Jim Morrison and The Doors, including 'No One Here Gets Out Alive' co-authored with Jerry Hopkins, and the autobiography 'Wonderland Avenue'. He helped film director Oliver Stone with the production of the 1991 movie The Doors. He also managed Iggy Pop, producing his song "Repo Man", and wrote the book Appetite For Destruction: The Days of Guns 'N Roses in 1991 (lung cancer).

in 2008 - Josh Groban was at No.1 on the US album chart with his Christmas album ‘Noel’. The best selling US album of 2007 selling over 3.5 million copies in 10 weeks.

in 2009 - Sam "Bluzman" Taylor dies at age 74. American singer-songwriter and guitarist whose music has been recorded by everyone from Elvis Presley and Son Seals to DMX and EPMD. He was part of Joey Dee & The Starlighters when they had their hit "Peppermint Twist" in 1962. Through the 1970s, he spent his days writing, producing, arranging and teaching more notably for 1970s legendary Funk/Soul group B.T Express when they had their No.1 R&B hits "Do It (Til You're Satisfied)" and "Express" in 1974/1975. He was also well known for his own blues work, of more than 12 albums, including "I Came from Dirt" and 2004's "Voice of the Blues", and his appearances at Long Island blues clubs. In 2006 he was inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame and just before his death, he released his autobiography "Caught In The Jaws Of The Blues" (heart disease)
in 2009 - Claude Jeter dies at age 94. American gospel music singer, known for his falsetto vocals; one time member of the Dixie Hummingbirds, he formed the Four Harmony Kings in 1938 with his brother and two fellow coal miners, which was later renamed as the Silvertone Singers. After the group was hired by a radio program based in Knoxville, Tennessee that was sponsored by the local Swan Bakery, they were renamed as the Swan Silvertones, the group would eventually become one of the most popular gospel quartets of the post-war era. During the 1950s many of the elements of the group's style resembled the then-prevalent rhythm and blues vocal group style. He received many offers to perform R&B or rock and roll, but rejected them all, citing a commitment he had made to his mother that he would always sing for the Lord

in 2010 - Willie Mitchell dies at age 81. American soul, R&B, rock and roll, pop and funk music producer and arranger who ran Royal Recording in Memphis, Tennessee. At the age of eight, he began to play the trumpet. While in high school, he was a featured player in popular local big bands. He later formed his own combo, which from time to time included musicians such as trumpeter Booker Little, saxophonists Charles Lloyd, and George Coleman, and pianist Phineas Newborn, Jr. He was maybe better known for his Hi Records label of the 1970s, whose sound was derivative of Booker T and the MG's, releasing albums by a large stable of popular Memphis soul artists, including among others Al Green, Syl Johnson, Ann Peebles and of course himself, as a trumpeter and bandleader he released a few popular singles for his Hi Records in the 1960s, including "Soul Serenade". He released his first solo record in 1963 and made another 16 instrumental albums over the next forty years. Willie and Al Green revived their successful recording partnership in 2003 when Green recorded I Can't Stop. They followed this up in 2005 with Everything's OK (cardiac arrest)

in 2010 - Harold Lewis dies at age 98. American flute player and session musician born in New York City. Harold was an accomplished flutist and respected studio musician for more than 25 years having worked at Disney, RKO, Paramount, 20th Century Fox, Warner Brothers, Goldwyn, Universal, and Hal Roach Studios, where he performed in numerous motion pictures including "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," "Bambi," "Pinocchio," and his piccolo solo can be heard in "The Three Little Pigs." Other films include "Citizen Kane," "The Ten Commandments," "Gone With the Wind," "Love With the Proper Stranger," "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm," and a number of Laurel and Hardy comedies. Harold was honored to accompany artists such as Mel Torme, Lily Pons, and Jascha Heifetz and to work with numerous talented composers and conductors such as Alfred Newman, George Gershwin, and Elmer Bernstein.

in 2011 - Keijiro Yamashita dies at age 71. Japanese rockabilly singer; he started his career in 1958 at the age of 18, appearing in the “Western Carnival” stage show at the Nihon Gekijo in Tokyo. From there, he quickly found fame as one of the “Rockabilly Sannin Otoko” along with Masaaki Hirao and Mickey Curtis. Despite being hospitalized and undergoing treatment, he performed a dinner show in the Tochigi prefecture on December 26 2010. Sitting in a wheelchair on stage, he extended the performance from its originally scheduled 10 minutes to 40 minutes. Among the songs he performed during the show was his well-known cover of Paul Anka’s “Diana” (cancer)

in 2011 - Brian Rust dies at age 88. British jazz discographer and music journalist; born in London, he collected records from the age of 5. He worked in the BBC's record library from 1945-1960, and supervised broadcasting selections. He wrote for The Gramophone from 1948-1970, and wrote freelance from 1960, including copious liner notes for jazz releases. He hosted the Mardi Gras radio program on Capital Radio from 1973-1984. His Jazz Records 1897-1942, revised several times since its initial publication in 1961, is a standard jazz discography.
in 2012 - Amit Saigal dies at age 46. Indian rock musician, promoter of rock music, publisher and impresario. Saigal founded the music magazine Rock Street Journal, the first rock magazine in India, and promoted alternative music in India. Amit was also termed as "Papa Rock" by the rock music community of India (drowned at Bogmalo beach in Goa) - Born July 6th 1965.

in 2012 - Hikaru Hayashi dies at age 81. Japanese composer, pianist and conductor born in Tokyo. He composed more than 30 operas and was artistic director and resident composer of the Opera Theatre Konnyakuza. His oeuvre also includes symphonic works, works for band, chamber music, choral works, songs and more than 100 film scores. He wrote more than 20 books including Nihon opera no yume / The Dream of Japanese Opera and in 1998 Hikarui won the 30th Suntory Music Award (tragically Hikaru died after collapsing in front of his home hitting his head. He was rushed to the hospital but was unresponsive) - Born October 22nd 1931.

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Old January 5th, 2013, 05:26 AM   #1827

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Check this out. It's issue number four of our Journal.
Download time only a couple of minutes.
HistorumQJH vol.1-No.4.pdf
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Old January 6th, 2013, 05:27 AM   #1828

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6 JANUARY
page 1 of 2

in 1486 - Martin Agricola, [M Sore], German composer/cantor is born
in 1683 - Francois de La Croix, composer is born
in 1685 - Malachias Siebenhaar, composer, dies at 68
in 1692 - Rynoldus Popma van Oevering, organist and composer, is born.
in 1695 - Giuseppe Baldassare Sammartini, oboist and composer, is born.
in 1697 - Carlo Mannelli, composer, dies at 56.

in 1702 - Jose Melchior de Nebra Blascu, principal organist of the Spanish royal chapel, and a highly successful theater composer, is baptised.

in 1728 - Charles-Joseph-Balthazar Sohier, composer is born
in 1738 - Franz Xaver Murschhauser, organist, composer and music theorist, dies at 74.
in 1742 - Johann Georg Reinhardt, composer, dies
in 1790 -Johann Trier, violinist and composer, dies at 73.
in 1791 - Jose Melchor Gomiz y Colomer, composer is born
in 1794 - Kaspar Masek, composer is born
in 1798 - Ferdinand Simon Gassner, violinist, composer and musicologist, is born.
in 1800 - William Jones, composer, dies at 73
in 1803 - Henri Herz, composer) is born

in 1807 - Ludwig Erk, composer, teacher, collector of folksongs and musicologist, is born. Erk was was the first scientific melody collector in Germany. By comparison of different song variants he tried to derive uncorrupted original versions of folk songs. He collected around 20,000 folk songs, and his work, Deutscher Liederhort, revised by Franz Magnus Bohme, is still the standard work on the German folk song; the "Erk-Böhme."

in 1831 - Rodolphe Kreutzer, violinist, teacher, conductor, and composer of 40 operas, dies at 64.
in 1838 – Max Christian Friedrich Bruch, distinguished German composer, conductor, and pedagogue, is born at Cologne.
His mother was a soprano and singing teacher, and it was from her that he first studied piano. He was only 9 when he wrote his first composition. He soon began taking theory lessons with Heinrich Breidenstein in Bonn. After winning the Mozart Foundation prize of Frankfurt am Main in 1852, he went there to study composition with Hiller and piano with Reinecke and Ferdinand Breunung (1853-57).

He then composed his first opera, Scherz, List und Rache, after Goethe, which was premiered in Colgne on Jan. 14, 1858. After studying philosophy, art, and architecture at the Univ. of Bonn (1859), he devoted himself fully to a musical career. He then composed the opera Die Loreley (Mannheim, June 14, 1863). While staying in Mannheim, he received instruction in conducting and orchestration from Franz Lachner.

With his choral work Frithjof, which he conducted at its premiere in Aachen on Nov. 20, 1864, Bruch established himself as a composer of effective choral works. Frithjof was subsequently given in other German cities, as well as in Vienna with much success. From 1865 to 1867 Bruch was director of the Royal Institute for Music and of the subscription concerts in Koblenz. While in Koblenz, Bruch wrote his most celebrated score, his First Violin Concerto (Koblenz, April 24,1866). It subsequently was played by all the leading violin virtuosos of the day and became a standard repertory piece.

From 1867 to 1870 he served as first court conductor in Sondershausen. He then went to Berlin, where his opera Hermione was premiered on March 21, 1872. While it proved a failure, Bruch found success with his secular oratorio Odysseus (Barmen, Feb. 8,1873). In 1878 he became conductor of the Stern'schen Gesangverein in Berlin.

In 1880 he was named musical director of the Liverpool Phil. Soc., which position he held until 1883. During this period, Bruch brought out 2 of his finest works, the so-called Scottish Fantasy for Violin and Orch. and Kol Nidrei for Cello and Orchestra. The latter, based on a traditional Jewish melody, led to the erroneous assumption that Bruch was Jewish. In fact, he was descended from a long-standing Protestant family.

In 1883 Bruch toured the U.S. as a conductor of various choral organizations. From 1883 to 1890 he was conductor of the Breslau Concert Society. He then completed work on his Third Violin Concerto, which was a great success at its premiere in Diisseldorf on May 31, 1891. In 1892 Bruch became a professor and director of the master class in composition at the Berlin Royal Academy of Arts, remaining there until his retirement in 1911.

In 1893 he received an honorary D.Mus. degree from the University of Cambridge and in 1918 honorary doctorates in philosophy and theology from the Univ. of Berlin. In 1881 he married the young contralto Clara Tuczek (b. Berlin, Feb. 15,1864; d. there, Aug. 27,1919), who occasionally sang at his concerts. Bruch's music, although imitative in its essence, retains a great eclectic charm. He was a thorough master of harmony, counterpoint, and instrumentation. His choral output was highly regarded in his homeland, particularly his secular works. While most of his music is now forgotten, his violin concertos, the Scottish Fantasy, and Kol Nidrei remain as notable examples of his gifts and continue to find their way occasionally into the concert hall. - Died at Friedenau, near Berlin, Oct. 2, 1920.

Avon's comment on Bruch:
The success of the Violin Concerto No. 1 didn't do Bruch much good. He had major difficulties composing it (though finally received assistance from Joachim), sold the score to a publishing company who failed to pay him royalties throughout the 1900s and 1910s, and eventually gave the score to a pair of sisters to sell in America (exempt from European copyright laws) who diddled him and kept the score for themselves. He died in 1920 in a state of destitution having never really benefitted from his own great talent. Since the end of WWII, when his music at last became standard ware (though only the Violin Concerto No. 1 has become genuinely popular), we have all benefitted greatly.
in 1850 - Franz Xaver Scharwenka, pianist, composer and founder of a music school, is born.
in 1856 - Giuseppe Martucci, composer, conductor, pianist and teacher, is born.

in 1858 – Ben(jamin) Grey Davies, Welsh tenor, is born at Pontardawe, near Swansea, South Wales. After winning first prize for solo singing at the Swansea Eisteddfod in 1877, he studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London (1878-80) under Randegger Sr., and Fiori, winning the bronze, silver, and gold medals for best declamatory English singing. His debut was in Birmingham, Oct. 11, 1881, in The Bohemian Girl. He created the title role in Sullivan's Ivanhoe (London, Jan. 31, 1891). In 1892 he made his debut at London's Covent Garden as Faust. He made his first appearance in the U.S. at the Chicago World's Fair in 1893, then was mainly active as a concert and oratorio singer. He sang regularly at the Handel Festivals until 1926. – Died at Bath, England, March 28,1943.

in 1861 - Heinrich Gottlieb Noren, composer is born.

in 1867 - Georges Martin Witkowski, composer and conductor, is born. Witkowski was originally a cavalry officer, but turned to music, and eventually was appointed as director of the Conservatory of Lyon.

in 1868 - Vittorio Monti, composer, violinist, and conductor, is born. His composition Csárdás, based on Hungarian folk melodies, is a standard piece in the repertoire of Romany musicians.

in 1872 - Alexander N Scriabin, Moscow, hallucinogenic composer (Prometheus) is born.

in 1873 - Karl Straube, organist, and choral conductor, famous for championing the organ music of Max Reger, is born.

in 1880 - Yuliya Lazarevna Veysberg, composer, wife of Andrey Nikolayevich Rimsky-Korsakov, is born.

in 1899 - Stophie-Carmen "Sonia" Eckhardt-Gramatte, Russian-born Canadian violinist, pianist, teacher, and composer, is born at Moscow. Her mother, a former pupil of Anton and Nikolai Rubinstein, gave her piano lessons in Paris (1906-08). She then studied violin with Alfred Brun and Guillaume Remy, piano with S. Chenee, and chamber music with d'Indy and Chevillard at the Paris Cons. (1909-13); while still a student, she gave concerts in Paris, Geneva, and Berlin, appearing as both a violinist and a pianist; she later received additional violin training from Huberman. In 1920 she married the painter Walter Cramatte: they lived in Barcelona (1924-26), but spent most of their time in Germany, where she toured as a duo pianist with Edwin Fischer in 1925. Her husband died in 1929. During the 1929-30 season, she toured the U.S., settling again in Germany in 1934, where she married the art critic Ferdinand Eckhardt; she assumed the name Eckhard-Cramatte in 1939. She took additional courses in composition from Max Trapp at Berlin's Preussische Akademie (from 1936). The couple went to Vienna in 1939 and to Winnipeg in 1953. In 1958 she became a naturalized Canadian citizen. Her works are marked by an impressive craftsmanship. - Died in a traffic accident at Stuttgart, Dec. 2, 1974.

in 1900 - Pierre-Octave Ferroud, composer, music critic and advocate of modern music, is born.

in 1902 - Mark Brunswick, American composer and teacher, is born at N.Y. He studied with Goldmark and Bloch; then lived in Europe (1925-38), during which time he studied with Boulanger in Paris and was active in Vienna. Returning to the U.S., he served as chairman of the National Committee for Refugee Musicians (1938-43) which was responsible for finding placement into musical and academic positions in the U.S. for hundreds of Europeans fleeing Hitler; was president of the American section of the ISCM (1941-50) and of the College Music Assn. (1953). After teaching at Black Mountain College (1944) and Kenyon College. (1945), he was chairman of the music dept. at the City College of N.Y. (1946-67). - Died at London, May 25, 1971.

in 1902 - Sofie-Carmen Eckhardt-Gramatte, composer is born.
in 1903 - Boris Blacher, Newchwang China, German composer (Orchester-Ornament) is born.

in 1903 - Maurice Abravanel, conductor, who received the US National Medal of Arts, and "Artist in Residence for Life" from the Tanglewood Music Festival, is born.

in 1904 - Ilya (Alexandrovich) Musin, Russian conductor and pedagogue, is born at Kostroma.
He received training at the Petrograd Conservatory. In 1926 he joined the faculty of the Leningrad (formerly Petrograd) Conservatory. In 1937 he became an asst. conductor of the Leningrad Philharmonic, under Nicolai Malko. Musin's Jewish heritage and his refusal to join the Communist Party proved to be major obstacles to his advancement, and he soon was sent to the Minsk Philharmonic, to serve as its music director. After World War II, he was allowed to rejoin the faculty of the Leningrad Conservatory. However, his career as a conductor was thwarted by the Soviet authorities who allowed him only to make infrequent guest appearances with Russian orchestras. After the collapse of the Soviet regime, Musin was invited to make his belated debut in the West as a guest conductor of the Royal Philharmonic, in London in 1996 at the age of 92. In his last years, he continued to teach at the Leningrad Conservatory, and gave master classes abroad. - Died at St. Petersburg, June 6, 1999.

in 1908 - Menahem Avidom, composer who was prominent in the early musical life of the state of Israel, is born.
in 1911 - Yannis Andreou Papaioannou, serialist composer and teacher, is born.
in 1914 - Arnold Richardson, organist and composer, is born.
in 1916 - Philip Thomas Bezanson, composer and teacher, is born.
in 1918 - Eugene Harold “Buddy” Weed, jazz pianist and arranger, Director of Music for ABC, is born.
in 1919 - Sylvia Syms, US singer (Hello Dolly, Dream Girl, Them There Eyes) is born
in 1920 - Earl Kim, composer and teacher, is born.

in 1922 Finn Einar Mortensen, "neo-serialist" composer and teacher, leader of Ny Musikk, a Norwegian advocacy group for contemporary music, is born.

in 1924 - Earl Scruggs, innovative bluegrass banjo player (Scruggs style), composer, member of Bill Monroe's Blue Grass Mountain Boys and Flatt and Scruggs, member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and inaugural inductee into the International Bluegrass Music Hall of Honor, is born.

in 1924 – Poulenc Nijinska's ballet "Les Biches" premieres in Monte Carlo.
in 1929 - Wilbert Harrison, R and B singer (Kansas City) is born.

in 1932 - John Alexander Burch(ell), jazz pianist, composer, is born at London.
He studied piano from age 12, performed in Army bands, then gigged around London. In the late 1950s, he worked with own trio on U.S. bases in Europe. He played with the Jazzmakers in summer 1960, then joined the Don Rendell Quartet (early 1961-late 1962); afterwards, he led his own octet, which continued to flourish intermittently through the 1970s and 1980s and included, at various times, Ray Warleigh, Peter King, Dick Morrissey, and Hank Shaw. He also freelanced with Tommy Whittle and others; played at Ronnie Scott's with Roland Kirk (1966) and Freddie Hubbard (1967); and toured with Hubbard. As a composer, Burch's most famous piece was "Preach and Teach," which was a hit for R&B singer Georgie Fame in 1966, and was later recorded by Buddy Rich for his album Mercy, Mercy (1968). He taught regularly at jazz summer schools including the Barry Summer School (1975) and the NYJO Easter Jazz Course (1974). In the mid-1970s, he was occasionally leading a trio, octet, or quintet. He often worked with Ray Warleigh, Kathy Stobart (from around 1978), and Georgie Fame. In 1980-81, he toured and recorded with Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson. He worked regularly in Dick Morrissey's Quartet from the mid-1980s through to the 1990s, and remains active freelancing.

in 1932 - Sacha Distel, French singer is born.
in 1933 - Hector Rivera (US latin soul keyboardist, arranger, composer) is born.

in 1933 - Vladimir de Pachmann, eccentric Russian-born Italian pianist, dies at Rome.
He received his primary music education at home from his father, an Austrian lawyer and amateur musician; his mother was Turkish. He then was a pupil of J. Dachs at the Vienna Conservatory (1866-68), graduating with the Gold Medal. He began his concert career with a tour of Russia in 1869, but he was 40 years old before he made a decisive impact on the international scene.

His first American tour, in 1891, was sensationally successful, and it was in America that he began exhibiting his curious eccentricities, some of them undoubtedly calculated to produce shock effect: he made grimaces when he did not like his own playing and shouted "Bravo!" when he played a number to his satisfaction; even more bizarre was his crawling under the grand piano after the concert, claiming that he was looking for the wrong notes he had accidentally hit; all this could be explained as idiosyncratic behavior, but he also allowed himself to mutilate the music itself, by inserting arpeggios between phrases and extra chords at the end of a piece.

Most American critics were outraged by his shenanigans, but some, notably Philip Hale, found mitigation in the poetic quality of his interpretations. Pachmann was particularly emotional in playing Chopin, when his facial contortions became quite obnoxious; James Huneker dubbed him "Chopinzee."

Pachmann did not lack official honors; in 1885, on his tour of Denmark, he was made a Knight of the Order of Danebrog, and in 1916 the Royal Philharmonic Society of London awarded him its Gold Medal. He made his last tour of the U.S. in 1925, then spent his last years in Italy, becoming a naturalized Italian citizen in 1928.

His personal life was turbulent; he married frequently (the exact number of his wives is in dispute). His first wife was his pupil, the Australian Maggie Oakey (1864-1952), who toured as Marguerite de Pachmann from the time of their marriage (1884) until their divorce (1895); she later married a French lawyer, becoming known as Marguerite de Pachmann- Labori. Pachmann and his first wife had a son, Adrian de Pachmann (c. 1893-1937), who also became a pianist. - Born at Odessa, July 27,1848.

in 1934 - Bobby Lord, country singer/songwriter and guitarist, is born.
in 1935 - Nino Tempo, pop and jazz singer and saxophonist, is born.
in 1935 - Paul Wilson, doo wop singer (The Flamingos), is born.
in 1937 - Doris Troy, R&B and soul singer "Mama Soul," is born.
in 1937 - Paolo Conte (Italian singer, pianist, composer, lawyer) is born.
in 1938 - Adriano Celentano (Italian singer, songwriter, comedian, actor, film director, TV host) is born.

in 1940 - Van Allen Clinton McCoy, R&B and pop singer/songwriter, music producer, arranger, and orchestra conductor, is born

in 1942 - Emma Calvé Rosa Emma Calvet dies at age 83. French soprano born in Decazeville; she studied the art of singing under Jules Puget. After her debut at the Brussels La Monnaie, she took lessons in Paris from the celebrated teacher Mathilde Marchesi. She made a tour of Italy, where she saw the famous actress Eleonora Duse, whose impersonations made a deep impression on the young singer. She trained herself in stage craft and gesture by closely observing Duse's performances. Emma went on to be probably the most famous French female opera singer of the Belle Époque. Hers was an international career, and she sang regularly and to considerable acclaim at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York, and the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
in 1946 - Roger Keith "Syd" Barrett, rock singer/songwriter and guitarist (Pink Floyd), is born.
in 1947 - Sandy Denny, folk rock singer/songwriter, guitarist, keyboardist (Fairport Convention), is born
in 1947 - Shirley Brown (US southern soul singer) is born.

in 1949 - Richard Horowitz, classical, jazz and electronic composer, producer, arranger, and musician (keyboard, ney, and percussion), is born.

in 1949 - Joey Miskulin (US 12-bass accordion; sessionist/freelance) is born
in 1951 - Kim Wilson, blues singer and harmonica player (The Fabulous Thunderbirds), is born.
in 1953 - Malcolm Young, rock singer/songwriter and guitarist (AC/DC), is born.

in 1956 - Elvis Presley performed in the gym at Randolph High School, Mississippi; this was the last time he ever appeared in a small auditorium.

in 1958 - Gibson guitars launched it' 'Flying V' electric guitar. Guitarists who played a Flying V include, Albert Collins, Jimi Hendrix, Marc Bolan and Billy Gibbons from ZZ Top.

in 1959 - Kathy Sledge, pop, R&B and disco singer (Sister Sledge), is born.
in 1959 - Neil Simpson (UK bassist, 7 string bass, midi bass-synthesizer; Climax Blues Band) is born.
in 1959 - Jose Enrique Pedreira, composer of Puerto Rican danzas, dies at 54.
in 1960 - Muzz Skillings (US bassist, guitar, singer; Living Colour/Medicine Stick) is born.
in 1961 - Dirk de Vries, pop bassist (Kong-Slauerhoff), is born.
in 1962 - Michael Houser (US lead guitarist, song-writer; Widespread Panic) is born.

in 1962 - Elvis Presley had his third UK No.1 album with 'Blue Hawaii'; it spent a total of 18 weeks at the top of the charts.

in 1963 - Paul Brindley, rock bassist (The Sundays), is born.
in 1963 - Jazzie B Trevor Beresford Romeo OBE (UK singer, DJ, music producer; Soul II Soul) is born.
in 1964 - Mark O'Toole, pop bassist (Frankie Goes to Hollywood), is born.
in 1964 - Yuri Valenzuela Canseco (Mexican actress, singer) is born.
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Old January 6th, 2013, 05:30 AM   #1829

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in 1964 - Rolling Stones' 1st tour as headline act (with Ronettes).

in 1964 - The first night of a 14 date UK tour 'Group Scene 1964', featuring The Rolling Stones, The Ronettes, Marty Wilde, The Swinging Blue Jeans and Dave Berry and The Cruisers, played at the Granada Theatre, Harrow on The Hill, Middlesex.

in 1966 - Sharon Cuneta (Filipina singer, actress) is born.
in 1966 - Andrew Wood (US singer; Mother Love Bone) is born.
in 1966 - A. R. Rahman (Indian composer) is born.
in 1967 - Peter Loran, rock singer/songwriter (Trixter), is born.

in 1967 - The Who played their first gig of this year when they appeared at Morecambe, Central Pier in England.
in 1968 - Irish singer Val Doonican was at No.1 on the UK album chart with 'Val Doonican Rocks, But Gently'.

in 1968 - The Beatles 'Magical Mystery Tour' started an eight week run at No.1 on the US album chart, the group's 11th US chart topper.

in 1969 - Tim Garbutt (UK musician; dance-metal duo Utah Saints) is born.
in 1970 - Crosby Stills Nash & Young made their UK live debut at the Royal Albert Hall, London.
in 1971 - Neil Young returns to his homeland of Canada for his first concert there since his pre-stardom days.
in 1971 - Gary Wiseman (US punk-rock drummer; Bowling for Soup) is born.
in 1971 - Irwin Thomas (Australian singer; Southern Sons) is born.
in 1972 – Nek Filippo Neviani (Italian singer) is born.

in 1973 - Carly Simon's 'You're So Vain', (with Mick Jagger on backing vocals), started a three week run at No.1 on the US singles chart.

in 1975 - Pink Floyd started session’s start at Abbey Road Studios London for their next album ‘Wish You Were Here’.

in 1975 - The mayor of Boston cancelled a Led Zeppelin concert after over 2,000 fans rioted trying to buy tickets. The fans caused an estimated $50,000 to $75,000 damage at Boston Garden. The gig during the bands North American tour was rescheduled for Feb 4th.

in 1975 - Chase Hampton (singer; Party-Rodeo) is born.
in 1975 - Jason King (UK radio DJ; Radio 1) is born.
in 1993 - John B "Dizzy" Gillespe, blues trumpeter, dies of cancer at 75.

in 1976 - Oscar Esplá, composer, President of the Spanish National Board of Music and Director of the National Conservatory of Music and Declamation of Madrid, dies at 89.

in 1976 - Johnny Yong Bosch (US actor, singer, guitarist; Eyeshine) is born.


in 1977 - EMI Records dropped The Sex Pistols, giving the band £40,000 ($68,000) to release them from their contract.

in 1978 - Nikki Einfeld (Canadian opera singer) is born.
in 1979 - The Village People's ‘Y.M.C.A’ becomes their only UK No.1 single. At it's peak it sold over 150,000 copies a day.

in 1979 - The Bee Gees started a two week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Too Much Heaven' the group's 7th US No.1.

in 1979 - Showaddywaddy went to No.1 on the UK chart with their 'Greatest Hits' compilation.

in 1979 - The Village People scored their only UK No.1 single with 'Y.M.C.A.' At its peak the single was selling over 150,000 copies a day. In the gay culture from which the group sprang, the song was understood as celebrating the YMCA's reputation as a popular cruising and hookup spot.

in 1980 - Georgeanna Marie Tillman Gordon dies at age 36. American singer brought up in Detroit, she joined a singing group with high school friends Gladys Horton, Georgia Dobbins, Katherine Anderson, and Wyanttea Cowart and called the Casinyets. After coming in second place during a talent contest, the group, now known as The Marvels, went to Motown's Hitsville USA studio and auditioned for the label's head Berry Gordy and leading artist/staffer Smokey Robinson. The group performed well but was required to come back with their own song. Georgia co-wrote the song "Please Mr. Postman" for the group and the Marvels signed to Motown's Tamla label in 1961, Gordy altering their name to the Marvelettes. Georgeanna remained a member from then on until 1965 when her illness began to affect her performances
in 1981 – Sache Mike Jones (US rapper; Souf Folk) is born.
in 1983 - Bernard George Stevens, classical composer and teacher, dies at 66.
in 1983 - Mithra Jin (South-Korean hip hop musician) is born.
in 1986 - Alex Turner (UK vocalist, guitarist, songwriter; Arctic Monkeys/The Last Shadow Puppets) is born.

in 1986 - Joe Farrell Joseph Carl Firrantello dies at age 48. US jazz saxophonist and flutist; well known for his performance with Chick Corea in Return to Forever, as well as a series of albums under his own name on the CTI label having a major hit with his third album “Moon Gems,” in 1972, backed by top sidemen including Herbie Hancock, Stanley Clarke and Jack DeJohnette. He also recorded with Charles Mingus, The Band, Maynard Ferguson Big Band, Slide Hampton, Andrew Hill, Average White Band, Jaki Byard, Hall & Oates, Fuse One and Elvin Jones among others. He is bettwr known for a series of albums under his own name on the CTI record label and for playing in the initial incarnation of Chick Corea's Return to Forever.
in 1987 - Eric Clapton started what became an annual event by playing six shows at the Royal Albert Hall, London.

in 1989 - The biggest selling UK album artists of 1988 were, No.5, Dire Straits, No.4, U2, No.3, Michael Jackson, No.2, Kylie Minogue and No.1, Fleetwood Mac.

in 1990 - Phil Collins started a three-week run at No.1 on the US album chart with '...But Seriously'.

in 1993 - It was reported that David Bowie had lost over £2.5 million ($4.25 million) in unpaid royalties to an Italian Mafia-linked bootleg fraud.

in 1993 - Dizzy Gillespie John Birks Gillespie dies at age 75. American jazz trumpet player, bandleader, singer, and composer dubbed "the sound of surprise", his image is almost inseparable from his trademark trumpet, whose bell bends upward at a 45-degree angle rather than pointing straight ahead as in the conventional design. Born in Cheraw, South Carolina, he started to play the piano at the age of four and taught himself how to play the trombone as well as the trumpet by the age of twelve. His first professional job was with the Frank Fairfax Orchestra in 1935, after which he joined the respective orchestras of Edgar Hayes and Teddy Hill, in 1937. Teddy Hill’s band was where Dizzy Gillespie made his first recording, King Porter Stomp. In 1939, Dizzy joined Cab Calloway's orchestra. During this time started writing big band music for bandleaders like Woody Herman and Jimmy Dorsey. He then freelanced with a few bands, most notably Ella Fitzgerald's orchestra, made up of members of the late Chick Webb's band, in 1942. 1943, saw Dizzy with the Earl Hines orchestra, but in 1945, he left Eckstine's band wanting to play with a small combo and he e and Charlie Parker worked together. After his work with Parker, Dizzie led other small combos, including ones with Milt Jackson, John Coltrane, Lalo Schifrin, Ray Brown, Kenny Clarke, James Moody, J.J. Johnson, and Yusef Lateef and finally put together his first successful big band. Dizzie was a major figure in the development of bebop and modern jazz. He taught and influenced many, many other musicians, including trumpeters Miles Davis, Fats Navarro, Clifford Brown, Arturo Sandoval, Lee Morgan, Jon Faddis and Chuck Mangione. (pancreatic cancer)
in 1993 - Rudolph Nureyev, Russian ballet dancer (Kirov), dies of AIDS at 54.
in 1993 - Bill Wyman announces he will leave Rolling Stones.
in 1995 - James Clay, saxophonist, dies at 59.
in 1996 - Robert Russell "Chubby" Wise, bluegrass fiddler who played with Bill Monroe's Blue Grass Boys and Flatt and Scruggs, dies at 80.

in 1996 - James Brown's wife Adrienne died in a Los Angeles hospital aged 47 after suffering a heart attack during a major plastic surgery operation.

in 1997 - Two bronze busts worth £50,000 were stolen from a garden at George Harrison's estate in Henley-on- Thames, Oxfordshire. Thieves had climbed a 10- foot-wall and cut the figures of two monks from their stone plinths.

in 1999 - Michel Petrucciani dies at age 36. French jazz pianist; Michel was born with osteogenesis imperfecta, in his early career his father and brother occasionally carried him, literally, because he could not walk far on his own unaided. Although he trained for years as a classical pianist, an enthusiast of Duke Ellington, and jazz remained his main interest. He gave his first professional concert at the age of 13 and moved to America in 1982, where he successfully encouraged Charles Lloyd to resume playing actively. Then on February 22nd 1985, with Michel cradled in his arms, Charles Lloyd walked onto the stage at Town Hall in New York City and sat Michel on his piano stool for what would be an historic evening in jazz history: the filming of One Night with Blue Note. In 1986 he recorded a live album with Wayne Shorter and Jim Hall. He also played with diverse figures in the US jazz scene including Dizzy Gillespie. In 1994 Michel was granted a Légion d'honneur in Paris (pulmonary infection).

in 2001 - Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour won the right to his dot com name. Dave took legal action in his battle to reclaim davidgilmour.com from Andrew Herman who had registered the URL and was selling Pink Floyd merchandise through the site.

in 2002 - Daniel Bedingfield returns to No.1 on the UK singles chart for the second time with ‘Gotta Get Thru This’

in 2003 - Hirini Melbourne dies at age 53. Maori composer, singer, university lecturer, poet and author, from Ngai Tuhoe and Ngati Kahungunu Maori tribes. He is known in New Zealand for his work surrounding the revival Maori culture. A member of Nga Tamatoa, which petitioned the New Zealand Government to have Maori taught in schools as part of its focus on Maori identity, he also studied at Auckland University and later became the Dean and associate professor of Maori and Pacific development. The power of his melodies and the brilliance of his compositions have still to be widely recognised, although dozens of his now classic songs are sung in classrooms throughout New Zealand. He regularly played with Richard Nunns. This partnership lead to the release of ‘Te Ku Te Whe’, a CD of original and traditional compositions for a variety of Maori flutes which has been awarded a Gold Disc Award. A second CD together with a DVD ‘Te Hekenga-a-rangi’ was released in 2003. In 2002 Hirini was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Waikato where he had been a lecturer in the Department of Maori. He was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit in the 2003 New Year’s Honours just before his untimely death a week later.
in 2004 - Feargal Sharkey, the former lead singer with The Undertones was made Head of The Live Music Forum a body to promote music in the UK.

in 2005 - US CD sales rose for the first time in four years. The CD format accounted for 98% of the 666 million albums sold, according to research company Nielsen Soundscan. A total of 140 million digital tracks were legally downloaded during 2004, equivalent to 14 million albums. R&B star Usher was the biggest-selling artist with his album 'Confessions' selling eight million copies. Other top sellers of the year were Norah Jones, Eminem and country stars Kenny Chesney and Gretchen Wilson. The UK recorded a record year for album sales in 2004, with 237 million sold The Scissor Sisters proved the most popular album of the year, followed by Keane and Maroon 5.

in 2005 - Les Robinson dies at age 90. American jazz musician; started on the trumpet, but famous for playing and recording alto-sax and sometimes clarenet with the big swing bands of Artie Shaw, Tommy Dorsey, Benny Goodman, Howard Thomas to mention just a few. He was Artie Shaw's lead alto on the classic "Begin the Beguine" and he is all Artie Shaw's recordings from 1937 to 1939.

in 2006 - Louis Allen "Lou" Rawls dies at age 72. American jazz, soul, R&B singer-songwriter born in Chicago. Lou was a high school classmate of Sam Cooke, they sang together in the Teenage Kings of Harmony, a '50s gospel group. After 3 years in the US Army as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division, leaving as a sergeant, he travelled to LA with The Pilgrim Travelers. While touring the South in 1958 with the Travelers and Sam Cooke, he was in a serious car crash. Lou was pronounced dead before arriving at the hospital, it took him nearly a year to fully recuperate, allowing him to perform at the Hollywood Bowl in 1959. This led him to be signed to Capitol Records. His debut Capitol solo release, a jazz album, Stormy Monday (a.k.a. I'd Rather Drink Muddy Water) was the first of 28 albums made with Capitol. As well as his recording and touring career, he appeared as an actor in motion pictures and on television, and voiced-over many cartoons. He had been called "The Funkiest Man Alive". In 1967 Lou won his first Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance, for the single "Dead End Street" and he performed the national anthem of the United States, "The Star Spangled Banner", prior to the Earnie Shavers-Muhammad Ali title fight at Madison Square Garden. They requested him to sing the anthem many times over the next 28 years. Although he was seriously ill with cancer, his final performance there, was on October 23rd, 2005 at the Chicago White Sox and Houston Astros, Game Two of the 2005 World Series. (complications of lung and brain cancers).
in 2006 - Alexis Clair Snouffer "Alex St. Clair," rock guitarist who went to high school with Frank Zappa, but played with Captain Beefheart, dies at 64.


in 2006 - Ms Dynamite was charged with assaulting a police officer and disorderly conduct. The singer allegedly punched a female officer in the face, bruising her nose, while in custody. She had been arrested after allegedly kicking the door to the Paragon Lounge night-club in London and was said to have been abusive towards officers who questioned her.

in 2006 - A collection of Elvis Presley memorabilia bought by a council worker who embezzled nearly £600,000 was set to be sold to compensate the local authority. Julie Wall, 46, from Rippon Drive in Sleaford, was jailed for three years for the offence last October. The collection - which included rare recordings and foreign pressings of Elvis songs – was to be auctioned off by a High Court receiver to provide compensation.

in 2006 - Guitarist, trumpeter and drummer Alex St. Claire died. Member of The Omens, The Solid Senders and an original member of Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band and Frank Zappa.

in 2007 - Sneaky Pete Kleinow dies at age 72. American pedal steel guitarist, co-founded influential 1960s country rock group the Flying Burrito Brothers; born in South Bend, Indiana, he originally worked as a special effects artist and stop motion animator for movies and television, including the Gumby, Outer Limits, and Davey and Goliath series. He also sat in with Bakersfield Sound-oriented combos and early country-rock aggregations playing the pedal steel guitar. This is where he became acquainted with Chris Hillman and Gram Parsons of The Byrds, helping the group to replicate their newly country-oriented sound onstage with banjoist Doug Dillard. After leaving the Byrds, in 1968, Parsons and Hillman invited Pete to join their new band, the Flying Burrito Brothers. He left behind his career in visual effects and spent the next thirteen years as a professional musician. He became an in demand session player for an eclectic range of artists, including Joe Cocker, Delaney, Bonnie and Friends and Little Feat. In 1972 Sneaky teamed up with Laramy Smith in the super group ARIZONA. He also added steel guitar to records by Frank Zappa, the Bee Gees, John Lennon, Linda Ronstadt and Fleetwood Mac. In 1974 Pete was part of a new band, Cold Steel, and then a reconstituted Flying Burrito Brothers. His first solo album, Sneaky Pete, was released in 1978 and The Legend and the Legacy followed in 1994. He had also returned to special effects and created the dinosaurs for the comic film Caveman (1981), starring Ringo Starr and Barbara Bach. In 1983, his work on the television miniseries The Winds of War was recognized with an Emmy Award for Special Visual Effects.Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, Pete created special effects for movies such as The Empire Strikes Back, Gremlins, The Right Stuff, The Terminator, and Terminator 2, while continuing to work sporadically as a professional musician. In 2000, Kleinow formed a group called Burrito Deluxe, the name of a 1970 Flying Burrito Brothers album. The group recorded three albums, Georgia Peach, The Whole Enchilada and 2007's Disciples Of The Truth, which feature his last studio recordings. Pete's last performance was at a 2005 Gram Parsons tribute concert in Waycross, Georgia, the home town of Gram Parsons (complications of Alzheimer's disease).
in 2008 - Seymour Marvin "Cy" Leslie dies at age 75. American music and video executive, he began his career by founding Voco Records, producing record greeting cards and children's records. He later e founded Pickwick Records, and was the first president and founder of MGM/UA Home Entertainment Group. Pickwick Records aimed to make music more affordable, and carried such artists as Elvis Presley at various times. MGM Home Video was the first company to enter the home video business, which today has become the home entertainment industry including DVD and other sales.

in 2009 - Maria Dimitriadi dies at age 58. Greek singer, born in Athens; she was considered a "total voice" and one of the most renowned performers of the songs of Mikis Theodorakis and Thanos Mikroutsikos. She primarily connected with political left-wing songs during the Junta and Metapolitefsi era in Greece, but she also experimented with other styles and genres, of a more lyrical tone (died from a rare lung disease)

in 2011 - Richard Wiedamann dies at age 78. German pianist, composer and cultural mediator born in Regensburg. In 1982 he was co-founder of the Jazz Weekend in the Old Town of Regensburg, initially with 15 Bands and 6000 mark budget. In 1987 he founded the National Youth Jazz Orchestra of Bavaria, he was the organization manager for 10 years until his move to Marktoberdorf. Shortly before his death he was awarded the Cultural Prize of the City of Regensburg 2010th.

in 2012 - W. Francis McBeth dies at age 78. American composer, whose wind band works are highly respected. His primary musical influences included Clifton Williams, Bernard Rogers, and Howard Hanson. The popularity of his works in the United States during the last half of the twentieth century led to many invitations and appearances as a guest conductor, where he often conducted the premiere performances of some of his compositions, the majority of which were commissioned. His conducting activities have taken him to forty-eight states, three Canadian provinces, Japan, and Australia. At one time, his "Double Pyramid Balance System" was a widely used pedagogical tool in the concert band world. As well as been honoured with several awards, from '57 until his retirement in 1996, he taught at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. - Born March 9th 1933.

in 2012 - Tom Ardolino dies at age 56. American drummer; he joined the Miami rock band, New Rhythm and Blues Quartet aka NRBQ in 1974 when original drummer Tom Staley departed. Tom remained behind the drums for the next 30 years, playing on 15 studio albums and countless live shows, until the group went on hiatus in 2004. NRBQ is known for its live performances, containing a high degree of spontaneity and levity, and blending rock, pop, jazz, blues and Tin Pan Alley styles. Although he played at NRBQ reunion concerts in the intervening years, Tom wasn’t well enough to resume drum duties when keyboardist Terry Adams reconstituted the band with a new lineup in 2011. As a resident of Springfield, Massachusetts, Tom appeared in a promotional video to campaign for the world premiere of The Simpsons Movie in Springfield and he also released a solo album "Unknown Brain" was released in 2004 (died following a long illness) - Born January 12th 1955.


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Old January 7th, 2013, 06:27 AM   #1830

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in 1591 - Jacobus de Kerle, French/Flemish composer, dies at about 59.
in 1612 - Paul de La Pierre, composer is born.

in 1630 - Composer Pier Cavalli marries rich widow Maria Sosomeno.
Video Notes: GIOVANNI BATTISTA LULLI [with Pier Francesco Cavalli*]
* The famous Italian composer (1602-1676), was commissioned to write an opera, Ercole amante, to celebrate the marriage of Louis XIV to Marie-Thérèse. In the event, Cavalli arrived in Paris with the work unfinished, and so at the last minute, a simplified version of his opera Xersès was substituted. Lully was asked to supply ballet interludes, and because of the short notice, he used material previous productions with no connection to Xerxès. Compared to the under-rehearsed opera, the six intermèdes had a light comedic mood. There are Basques and Spanish peasants (in honour of Marie-Thérèse), clowns, Scaramouche, and ship-owner with with his slaves, who carry monkeys dressed as clowns accompanied by sailors playing on trompettes marines.
in 1634 - Adam Krieger, organist and composer, a pioneer in the development of the solo Lied, is born.
in 1678 - Johannes Flittner, composer, dies at 59.
in 1710 - Josef Antonin Sehling, violinist and composer, is born.

in 1727 - Pierre-Montan Berton, French tenor, conductor, and composer, father of Henri-Montan Berton, is born at Maubert-Fontaines, Ardennes. He studied organ, harpsichord, and composition at the Senlis Cathedral choir school, and then completed his training in Paris. After singing at the Paris Opera and in Marseilles, he became director of the Bordeaux Grand Theatre. In 1755 he returned to Paris as conductor of the Opera, serving as its general director (1775-78). Under his leadership, the Paris Opera orchestra attained notable distinction. Berton was an adept arranger of the operas of Lully, Rameau, and Gluck, in which he interpolated his own music. - Died at Paris, May 14, 1780.

in 1736 - Ceslav Vanura, late baroque composer and organist, dies at 41.
in 1755 - Gallus Zeiler, organist and composer, dies at 49.

in 1787 - (Johann) Ludwig Bohner, German pianist and composer, is born at Tottelstadt.
Following his musical training, he attained the position of music director in Nuremberg. As a pianist, he scored his first major success at the Gewandhaus in Leipzig on May 16,1814. Concert tours then followed in Germany, and he also played in Austria, Denmark, and Switzerland. Bohner's early success as a pianist and his genuine talent as a composer were compromised in later years by his growing eccentricity and ill health. He led a wandering life in his native Thuringia, being compelled to sell himself and his scores virtually for alms. His final appearance as a pianist took place in Arnstadt in Aug. 1859. Bohner wrote a romantic opera, Die Madchen in einsamen Muhlenthale (1810-13), which he later reworked as the comic opera Der Dreiherrenstein (Meiningen, April 7, 1848). Its overture reveals a command of orchestral writing, as does his Grosse Ouvertiire for the concert hall (1812). He also wrote a well-crafted Symphony (1844), several piano concertos, and a number of variations for different solo instruments and orchestra. - Died at Gotha, March 28,1860.

in 1790 - Antonio Corbisiero, composer, dies at 69.

in 1807 - Ernesto Cavallini, outstanding Italian clarinetist, is born at Milan. At the age of 10, he entered the Milan Conservatory, as a pupil of Benedetto Carulli. Following concert tours of Italy, he played in the La Scala orchestra and taught in Milan. He gave concerts in Paris (1842) and London (1842,1845), and then was solo clarinetist at the St. Petersburg court (1852-70) before returning to Milan. A masterful performer, he was acclaimed as the Paganini of the clarinet. He composed a number of works for his instrument. - Died at Milan, Jan. 7,1874.

in 1810 - Joseph Lipavsky, pianist and composer, dies at 37.
in 1833 - Ramon Felix Cuellar y Altarriba, composer and organist, dies at 55.
in 1842 - Johan Lindegren, organist, composer, music theorist and publisher of hymnals, is born.
in 1842 - Gioacchino Rossini's "Stabat Mater" premieres in Paris.
in 1843 - Franz Schoberlechner, pianist and composer, dies at 45.
in 1853 - Nikolai Arkas, composer is born.

in 1860 - Emanuil Manolov, who composed the first Bulgarian opera; Siromahkinia, is born. Manolov is considered one of the founders of the Bulgarian professional musical culture. May be best known for his song Kakva Moma Vidiah, Mamo "What a Girl I Saw, Mama."

in 1868 - William Batchelder Bradbury, organist and composer of hymns, dies at 51.
in 1870 - Karl Schwencke, pianist and composer, dies at 72.

in 1876 - William Yeates Hurlstone, composer, is born. Charles Villiers Stanford, considered Hurlstone, among the many brilliant students whom he taught, to have been his most talented, but Hurlstone's life was cut short at 30 by bronchial athsma.

in 1884 - Jose Rozo Contreras, who composed the anthem of the department of Norte de Santander, in Columbia, is born.

in 1890 - Hans Matthison-Hansen, organist and composer, dies at 82.
in 1891 - Carl Gottfried Wilhelm Taubert, pianist composer and conductor, dies at 79.
in 1892 - Rudolf Moser, composer and conductor, is born.
in 1895 - Clara Haskil (Jewish Swiss classical pianist) is born.
in 1898 - Geronimo Baqueiro Foster, composer and Mexican musicologist, is born.

in 1898 - Al Bowlly, one of the all-time most popular British pop vocalists, guitarist, banjo player, pianist, is born at Maputo, Mozambique. Born to a Greek father and a Lebanese mother, he grew up in Johannesburg and learned to play the ukelele. Bowlly toured Africa and India as a banjo/guitarist and was a resident at Raffles in Singapore. He made his first records in Berlin (1927), then freelanced in London, making 678 sides (1930-4), mainly with the Roy Fox and Ray Noble bands. His best-known records are Noble compositions; 'The Very Thought of You" and others also did well in the U.S. Noble took Bowlly with him to N.Y. (1934), where Glenn Miller was Noble's arranger. Bowlly sang an early lyric to a Miller tune that later became "Moonlight Serenade/' He was successful in the U.S. but returned to London (1937) to tour with his own Radio City Rhythm Makers and team up with Maltese singer Jimmy Messini in Radio Stars With Two Guitars. Bowlly worked with West Indian bandleader Ken "Snakehips" Johnson (1940-41). A bomb hit the Cafe de Paris, killing Johnson and many others in March 1941; Bowlly was killed by another in April. He made the U.K. Top Ten album chart in 1978 as the featured singer in the Pennies from Heaven soundtrack. - Died at London, April 17, 1941.

in 1899 - Francis Jean Marcel Poulenc, Paris, composer/pianist (Les Biches) is born.

in 1900 - John (Donald Mackensie) Brownlee, Australian baritone, is born at Geelong. He was a pupil of Gilly in Paris, where he made his operatic debut as Nilakantha in Lakme at the TheatreLyrique in 1926. On June 8, 1926, he first appeared at London's Covent Garden as Marcello during Melba's farewell concert. From 1927 to 1936 he was a member of the Paris Opera; also sang at the Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires (1931) and the Glyndebourne Festivals (1935-39). On Feb. 17, 1937, he made his Metropolitan Opera debut in N.Y. as Rigoletto, and continued to sing there until 1957. He also sang in Chicago (1937-38; 1945), San Francisco (1940-50), and again at Covent Garden (1949-50). From 1953 to 1967 he was president of the American Guild of Musical Artists. He founded the Empire State Music Festival near Ellenville, N.Y., in 1955. In 1956 he became president of the Manhattan School of Music, and then was its president from 1966 until his death. Among his most prominent roles were Don Giovanni, Count Almaviva, Papageno, Alfonso, Iago, and Scarpia. - Died at N.Y., Jan. 10, 1969.

in 1903 - Shalva Azmaiparashvili, composer and conductor, Head of the Georgian Radio Symphony Orchestra, is born.

in 1903 - Vladimir Alexandrovich Vlasov, composer, People's Artist of Kirghizia and Russia, is born.
in 1903 - Vincent d'Indy's opera "L'etranger," premieres in Brussel.
in 1907 - Nicanor Zabaleta, virtuoso harpist, awarded the National Music Prize of Spain, is born.
in 1907 - Anton Urspruch, composer, dies at 56.
in 1917 - Ulysses Simpson Kay Jr., composer, conductor and teacher, is born.
in 1921 - John Lanigan, tenor is born.

in 1922 - Antonio Scontrino, double bassist and composer, dies at 71. The Conservatorio di Musica "Antonio Scontrino" in Trapani is named in his memory.

in 1922 - Jean-Pierre (Louis) Rampal, celebrated French flutist, conductor, and teacher, is born at Marseilles. He studied flute as a child with his father, first flutist in the Marseilles orchestra and a professpr at the Conservatory, then studied medicine until being drafted for military service by the German occupation authorities in 1943. When he learned that he was to be sent to Germany as a forced laborer, he went AWOL, and subsequently attended flute classes at the Paris Conservatory, winning the premier prix in 5 months. He played solo flute in the orchestra of the Vichy Opera (1946-50); concurrently began to tour, often in duo recitals with the pianist and harpsichordist Robert Veyron-Lacroix. He was solo flutist in the orchestra of the Paris Opera from 1956 to 1962, and also became a popular artist on the Paris Radio. He subsequently toured throughout the world with phenomenal success as a virtuoso, appearing as soloist with all the major orch orchestras and in innumerable recitals. In later years, he also appeared as a guest conductor. He taught at the Paris Conservatory, and gave master classes worldwide. His repertoire was vast, ranging from the Baroque masters to jazz, from the music of Japan to that of India, from arrangements to specially commissioned works. Of the last, such composers as Poulenc and Jolivet wrote pieces for him. Through his countless concerts and recordings, he did more than any other flutist of his time to bring his instrument into the mainstream of musical life. He was made a Chevalier of the Legion d'Honneur in 1966 and an Officier des Arts et Lettres in 1971. With D. Wise, he published Music, My Love: An Autobiography (N.Y., 1989). – Died at Paris, May 20, 2000.

in 1922 - Eric Jupp (UK-born Australian composer, arranger, conductor) is born.
in 1923 - Charles Russell Woolen, composer is born.
in 1935 - Noam Sheriff, composer and conductor, music director of the Haifa Symphony Orchestra, is born.
in 1935 - Kenny Davern (American jazz clarinetist, sax player) is born.
in 1935 - John Thomas Johnson (US tuba player; 2,000 film soundtracks) is born.
in 1936 - Eldee Young, US bassist (Young Holt Unlimited-Hang on Sloopy) is born.
in 1937 - Sylvia Cadllff, Swiss conductor, is born at Chur. She studied at the Lucerne Conservatory, receiving a piano diploma in 1961. She then attended Karajan's conducting classes at the Berlin Conservatory and continued conducting studies with Kubelik, Matacic, and Otterloo in Lucerne, Salzburg, and Hilversum. She made her debut with the Tonhalle Orchestra of Zurich. After winning first prize in the 1966 Mitropoulos conducting competition in N.Y., she was an asst. conductor under Bernstein with the N.Y. Philharmonic (1966-67). She then taught conducting at the Bern Conservatory (1972-77). In 1977 she became the first woman in Europe to be appointed a Generalmusikdirektor, when she took that position with the orchestra of the city of Solingen. She left that position in 1985.

in 1938 - "Paul Revere" Dick rock keyboardist, bassist and songwriter (Paul Revere and the Raiders), is born.
in 1938 - Rory Storm Alan Caldwell (UK lead singer; Rory Storm & The Hurricanes) is born.
in 1939 - David Buchan, musicologist, is born.
in 1939 - Lefty Baker Eustace Britchforth (US guitar, banjo, vocals; Spanky & Our Gang) is born.
in 1941 - Rod Hicks, blues bassist and singer (Paul Butterfield Blues Band), is born.
in 1941 - lona Brown, esteemed English violinist and conductor, is born at Salisbury, Wiltshire.
She studied violin as a child. In 1955 she joined the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain, remaining its member for 5 years. She also studied with Hugh Maguire in London, Remy Principe in Rome, and Henryk Szeryng in Paris and Nice. From 1963 to 1966 she played in the Philharmonia Orchestra of London. In 1964 she joined the Academy of St. Martin-in- the-Fields, and served as its director from 1974. In 1980 she was named music director of the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra in Oslo. She also was music advisor (1986-87) and music director (1987-92) of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and music director of the Sonderjyllands Symphony Orchestra in Sonderborg (from 1997). She was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1986.

in 1942 - Danny Williams, pop singer, is born.
in 1942 - Horatiu Radulescu (Romanian composer, spectral music pioneer) is born.
in 1943 - Leona Williams, country singer/songwriter, guitarist and bassist, is born.

in 1943 - Sir Richard Armstrong, English conductor, is born at Leicester.
He studied at Corpus Christi Coll., Cambridge. In 1966 he joined the staff of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, London; in 1968 he became asst. conductor of the Welsh National Opera, Cardiff; from 1973 to 1986 he was its music director; also appeared as a guest conductor. In 1993 he became music director of Glasgow's Scottish Opera and chief conductor of the new National Orch. of Scotland. That same year he was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

in 1944 - Mike McCartney "McGear", rock singer/songwriter, pianist and guitarist, is born. McGear changed his proffessional name so as to not capitalize on the fact that he's Paul McCartney's brother.

in 1945 - Engin Yörükoglu (Turkish drummer; pioneering rock band Mogollar) is born.
in 1945 - Dave Cousins (UK leader, vocals,guitar: the Strawbs) is born.
in 1946 - Andy Brown, pop drummer (the Fortunes), is born.
in 1946 - Jann Wenner (US founder, editor, publisher; Rolling Stone magazine) is born.

in 1946 - Adamo Didur dies at age 72. Polish operatic bass vocalist; he studied in Lwów with Valery Wysocki. He later worked with Franz Emmerich in Milan. His concert debut came in Milan in a performance of Ludwig van Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. He went on to sing extensively in opera in Europe and appeared at New York's Metropolitan Opera from 1908 to 1932.

in 1947 - David Porcelijn, Dutch composer/conductor is born.
in 1948 - Kenny Loggins, pop singer/songwriter (Loggins and Messina), is born.
in 1948 - Kaz Lux, Poland/Netherland, singer is born.
in 1949 - Marshall Chapman, country rock singer/songwriter and guitarist, is born.
in 1949 - John Christopher Parry, rocker (Cure) is born.
in 1950 - Juan Gabriel (Mexican singer and songwriter) is born.
in 1953 - Earl Wilber Force "Wire" Lindo, reggae keyboardist (The Wailers), is born.
in 1954 - José María Vitier (Cuban music composer, pianist) is born.
in 1955 - Marian Anderson becomes 1st black singer to perform at the Met in NYC.
in 1955 - 'Rock Around The Clock' by Bill Haley and his Comets, entered the UK chart for the first time.
in 1956 - Uwe Ochsenknecht (German actor, singer) is born.
in 1959 - Kathy Valentine, rock guitarist and bassist (Go-Go's), is born.
in 1959 - Jon Larsen (Norwegian guitarist, composer, record producer) is born.
in 1960 - Luis da Costa, composer, dies at 80.
in 1961 - Country singer Johnny Tillotson was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Poetry In Motion.'
in 1963 - Clint Mansell (UK vocalist, guitarist, composer; Pop Will Eat Itself) is born.
in 1964 - Cyril Davies, blues harmonica player, singer and bandleader, dies at 31 of leukemia.
in 1964 - Colin McPhee, composer, dies at 62.

in 1964 - Cyril Davies dies at age 32. English musician, born in Denham, Buckinghamshire, he was one of the first UK blues harmonica players and blues musicians. Cyril began his career in the early 1950s first within Steve Lane's Southern Stompers, then as part of an acoustic skiffle and blues group with Alexis Korner. He began as a banjo and 12-string guitar player before becoming Britain's first Chicago-style blues harmonica player. In 1962, he and Alexis Korner opened a club called the Ealing Club in London, adding bassist Jack Bruce, saxophonist Dick Heckstall-Smith and drummer Charlie Watts, to form the electric band Blues Incorporated, and they recorded the album R&B from the Marquee. Many budding young musicians visited the Ealing Club and 'guested' with Blues Incorporated, including Rod Stewart, Paul Jones, Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards, Eric Burdon, Mick Jagger, Brian Jones and Ginger Baker
7 JANUARY
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