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Old January 3rd, 2017, 11:41 AM   #1

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The Last Mughal Emperor- Bahadur Shah Zafar


Folks I would like to discuss the life and death of the last Mughal Emperor, Bahadur Shah II. Any information on Bahadur Shah II would be appreciated.

Bahadur Shah II worked for the British for most of his term as Mughal Emperor. Perhaps Bahadur Shah II is most remembered for his actions or non actions(depending on the conflicting accounts) during the Sepoy Rebellion of 1857. Now folks as I said there are conflicting accounts...some say that Bahadur Shah II approved of the rebellion, others not so much. In any event the British viewed Bahadur II as being the leader of the sepoy rebellion and ended up exiling Bahadur Shah II to Burma. Soon after being exiled to Burma, Bahadur Shah II passed away.

What caught my eye wrt Bahadur Shah II was that years after the death of the last Mughal emperor, the then PM of India, Dr. Manmohan Singh(a Sikh) payed homage to Bahadur(a Muslim)


Click the image to open in full size.gif hosting

sources,



The last days of Mughal Emperor Bahadur Shah Zafar in Burma | TwoCircles.net

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Bahadur-Shah-II

https://www.britannica.com/event/Indian-Mutiny

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahadur_Shah_II

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Old January 3rd, 2017, 12:59 PM   #2

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Bahadur Shah Zafar was great poet as well and his supported for the rebellion reflected in his words:

Ghaaziyon min bu rahegi jab talak imaan ki
Takht-e-London tak chalegi tegh Hindustan ki


As long as there remains the scent of faith in the hearts of the warriors.
The sword of India shall flash from here till the throne of London.
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Old January 4th, 2017, 04:41 AM   #3

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Zafar (Bahadur Shah II) was 82 years old at the time of the rebellion. As Wikipedia says, he was not interested in being an emperor. Just passed his days as a pensioner. He was just a symbol for the British as well as the mutinous sepoys, a symbol of Hindu-Muslim unity against the Britishers, which proved unfortunate for him and his children. He was exiled to Burma his two sons and a grandson were shot dead. Other children also passed into oblivion.

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Old January 4th, 2017, 04:47 AM   #4

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoanOfArc007 View Post
What caught my eye wrt Bahadur Shah II was that years after the death of the last Mughal emperor, the then PM of India, Dr. Manmohan Singh (a Sikh) payed homage to Bahadur Shah (a Muslim).
What is so strange in this? Sikhs and Hindus visit the mausoleums of Sufi Saints all over India regularly. Were they not men of God? The Sikh holy book, Guru Granth Sahib has verses written by Hindu and Muslim saints. Sure, India is sometimes difficult to understand.
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Old January 4th, 2017, 12:04 PM   #5
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What happened to the Mughal throne and the last pseudo emperor was a good thing for India. British would have gotten rid of it one way or the other. If the throne had somehow survived, it would only have served as a rallying point for the Indian Muslims later on for further division.

As far as praying goes, it shows that South Asians are excessively religious.
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Old January 4th, 2017, 12:49 PM   #6

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What happened to the Mughal throne and the last pseudo emperor was a good thing for India. If the throne had somehow survived, it would only have served as a rallying point for the Indian Muslims later on for further division.
Agree, as what happened was good because without British, Indians would not be able to speak good English !

But connecting Bahadur Shah II with Pakistan is just as ridiculous as connecting Veerapandiya Kattabomman with Dravida Nadu.
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Old January 4th, 2017, 03:45 PM   #7

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aupmanyav View Post
Zafar (Bahadur Shah II) was 82 years old at the time of the rebellion. As Wikipedia says, he was not interested in being an emperor. Just passed his days as a pensioner. He was just a symbol for the British as well as the mutinous sepoys, a symbol of Hindu-Muslim unity against the Britishers, which proved unfortunate for him and his children. He was exiled to Burma his two sons and a grandson were shot dead. Other children also passed into oblivion.
We have had our wars with the British, twice. The American Revolution was waging during the life of Kattabommna. There is a wide array of characters(Hindu and Muslim for example) from the India area that remind me of those that fought for the American revolution.



Yes I have read that that Bahadur Shah II was a man of multiculturalism.
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Old January 4th, 2017, 04:10 PM   #8

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoanOfArc007
We have had our wars with the British, twice. The American Revolution was waging during the life of Kattabommna. There is a wide array of characters(Hindu and Muslim for example) from the India area that remind me of those that fought for the American revolution.

Yes I have read that that Bahadur Shah II was a man of multiculturalism.
I found this man as a great connection between American revolution and rise of British power in India : Lord Cornwallis


Click the image to open in full size.
Cornwallis refused to meet formally with Washington, and also refused to come to the ceremony of surrender, claiming illness. Instead, Brigadier General Charles O'Hara presented the sword of surrender to Rochambeau. Rochambeau shook his head and pointed to Washington. O'Hara offered it to Washington, but he refused to accept it, and motioned to his second in command, Benjamin Lincoln, who had been humiliated by the British at Charleston, to accept it.


Click the image to open in full size.
French Military advisers advised Tipu Sultan to escape from secret passages but to their astonishment Tipu replied "One day of life as a Tiger is far better than thousand years of living as a Sheep". Tipu Sultan died defending his land.. His young sons were surrendered before Cornwallis...
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Old January 4th, 2017, 04:50 PM   #9

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I found this man as a great connection between American revolution and rise of British power in India : Lord Cornwallis


Click the image to open in full size.
Cornwallis refused to meet formally with Washington, and also refused to come to the ceremony of surrender, claiming illness. Instead, Brigadier General Charles O'Hara presented the sword of surrender to Rochambeau. Rochambeau shook his head and pointed to Washington. O'Hara offered it to Washington, but he refused to accept it, and motioned to his second in command, Benjamin Lincoln, who had been humiliated by the British at Charleston, to accept it.


Click the image to open in full size.
French Military advisers advised Tipu Sultan to escape from secret passages but to their astonishment Tipu replied "One day of life as a Tiger is far better than thousand years of living as a Sheep". Tipu Sultan died defending his land.. His young sons were surrendered before Cornwallis...

That is impressive, good comparison. The Crusader Richard I would have admired a man such as Tipu Sultan... I dont know much about Sultan, but Sultan from one painting is depicted as a leader who fought in the front lines. Sultan's response to the French military advisers reminds me of the stance taken by Nathan Hale before being hanged by the British,




Nathan Hale volunteers to spy behind British lines - Sep 10, 1776 - HISTORY.com

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Old January 4th, 2017, 07:46 PM   #10
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This Bahadur Shah was a proud descendant of brutal semi-civilized Muslims who invaded India to plunder, and stayed on to live of the loot, as parasites and leeches. The legacy of the Mughal rule is Pakistan, the eternal enemy of India. Here in the picture, Indian President, a Sikh whose religion was founded to fight against the atrocities committed against Indians by such Muslim conquerors, pray at his grave. The picture is surreal and makes no sense.
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