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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:00 AM   #11
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Were the people attending it still expected to take up employment as civil servants after all that education though, or could people attending go on to do different jobs? I guess that'd help determine whether it was closer to a university in our modern sense of the word, or if it was just a vocational government training institute with an expanded curriculum that included things like arts...
Although the students were certainly encouraged to become civil servants, they were not constrained to do so. Young men whose fathers did not absolutely order them to enter the public administration were free to follow their own cultural inclinations. Many indeed went on to become accomplished poets, philosophers and artists.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:05 AM   #12
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Did any of the Warring States sponsor schools?
As far as I know, the Warring States were too busy making war against each other to be very much concerned with education! In Japan, with the decline of the refined Heian culture and the universal spread of military government, the level of public education drastically declined until it was finally brought back to high standards in the Edo period.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:16 AM   #13
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Plato's Academy was the first we know of. Other Greek thinkers had their own schools, but those mostly were dedicated to the narrow interests of their founders. The Academy, as I understand it, embraced the notion that almost everything is worthy of study, so long as the discipline is pursued with an open-minded objectivity.

The development of enrollment and a standard curriculum leading to a degree certifying competence came later. Alexandria was a sprout that grew from Academy seed, but again there was, I don't believe, a structured path that led a student from ignorance to a competent grasp of the topics taught. Wherever large collections of "books" could be found, there also was a nascent University. In Europe, the University of Paris probably has the honors, but it had earlier roots further south, primarily in Italy.
In my opinion, Plato, Aristotle and all other Greek philosophers who established currents of thought opened schools mainly to propagate their own doctrines, not to impartially present various academic disciplines for the professional formation of their students. Thus, the Academy, the Stoa etc. can hardly be compared to universities in the modern sense of the word. Certainly Plato believed that almost everything was worthy of study...But he taught philosophical, not mundane academic themes.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:21 AM   #14
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Depends on your definition of a "university". University of Bologna 1088 AD is the oldest to be called a "universitas", and seems to be the oldest to have all the elements that are part of modern universities - formal degeee granting, established curriculum, exams,. While rhe Daigakuryo met most of these elements, I don't thing*it granted formal degrees with a diploma. Did it have exams? Also, it seems that Daigakuryo was a one off institution. The medieval Europe univerisities were part of a chain of institutions, and professors could and did travel between univerisities. As a center for establishing new ideas and knowledge, as medieval univerisities did and modern universities do, and not just regurgitate existing ideas, I don't think Daigakuryo did. But it sounds liked Daigakuryo came close.

The direct origin of the modern university sytem, from India to America to Europe, came out from the medieval university, and fanous medieval universites like Oxford are still world leading institutions today. (Despite how nationalist in other lands would like to spin thing, the fact remains that modern universities across the globe, were following the European university structure.)

If you widen your definition to include essentially an institute of higher learning, there were a number of ancient institutes, but they were not universities in the modern sense. Taxila in the Indian subcontinent, Nalanda, and others.
Daigakuryo did not award scroll-diplomas tied with ribbons, no. But they assigned formal recognition of graduation to their students. I'm not sure what this recognition consisted of; but some tangible proof must have been given to the graduates.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:22 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Augustus04 View Post
Takshashila in India existed since 6th century BC.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxila

Please explain how this university was organized and functioned. Thanks.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:24 AM   #16

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Taxila (Taksha Shira - Broken Head or Taksha Shila - Broken Slab of Stone perhaps pointing to a hill formation: Alexander Cunningham - Ancient Geography of India). Sure, something to be proud of. Are you from Kot Sundki, Bullit? Rawalpindi (Town of the Chief) must have been the capital of a principality.
Attock District - few miles to the West of Taxila. Between Formuli and Ghorghushti.

Ps. There are lots of modern universities around Taxila, including University of Engineering and Technology, Taxila - and many military related research/development facilities like HIT, HEC and PAF Kamra air university.

http://www.uettaxila.edu.pk/index.asp
http://www.hit.gov.pk/
http://www.hmc.com.pk/

Click the image to open in full size.

Last edited by Bullit; May 17th, 2017 at 06:35 AM.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:25 AM   #17
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There was a royal academy at Luoyang during the Han Dynasty, which came about three centuries after the first academy was established by Plato.
I am fascinated by the Han and T'ang Dynasties. Could you please send some info about the royal academy? Thanks.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:31 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Did any of the Warring States sponsor schools?
"school" is part of the political system at least since the western zhou.

not even to mention the warring states
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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:45 AM   #19
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In times or war, education always suffers. In times of peace, it blossoms.

The brilliant T'ang Emperors who dedicated their efforts to peaceful pursuits and the harmonious progress of human beings, created one of the most magnificent educational systems that the world has ever known. This splendid intellectual achievement is China's admirable heritage.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 06:58 AM   #20

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In times or war, education always suffers. In times of peace, it blossoms.

The brilliant T'ang Emperors who dedicated their efforts to peaceful pursuits and the harmonious progress of human beings, created one of the most magnificent educational systems that the world has ever known. This splendid intellectual achievement is China's admirable heritage.
Anyone who knows anything about the Chinese educational system, from history or from the modern, would know that it is not an educational system at all but a system that instills a selected amount of knowledge into the candidates.

No outside thinking is allowed.
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