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Old May 17th, 2017, 07:55 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by heylouis View Post
oxford does not fit until the colleges actually and properly integrate as one piece
Oxford's place in this thread is limited to defined establishment of written and oral exams. AFAIK, most uni’s until then relied (almost exclusively) on oral exams to graduate. Not sure if that was the case outside of Europe though.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 08:03 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Baldtastic View Post
Oxford's place in this thread is limited to defined establishment of written and oral exams. AFAIK, most uni’s until then relied (almost exclusively) on oral exams to graduate. Not sure if that was the case outside of Europe though.
eh.....i did even consider oral exams as real exams.......

my original meaning is like this:
you see, there were many colleges which made up the oxford.
although i am not sure if it is the common case, but i read that many oxford colleges focused only on one or two major, and one or two kinds of course.
hence, not until they integrate as one piece, oxford actually had non exclusive courses.
and, oxford was not one piece from the beginning. in a long time, it was not.

Last edited by heylouis; May 17th, 2017 at 08:06 AM.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 08:19 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by heylouis View Post
eh.....i did even consider oral exams as real exams.......

my original meaning is like this:
you see, there were many colleges which made up the oxford.
although i am not sure if it is the common case, but i read that many oxford colleges focused only on one or two major, and one or two kinds of course.
hence, not until they integrate as one piece, oxford actually had non exclusive courses.
and, oxford was not one piece from the beginning. in a long time, it was not.
Oxford was always governed by a chancellor, it was ‘one piece’ from the beginning. Each college has a dean to manage that subject, each college was essentially the equivalent of a department in a modern university. Lines were slightly blurred between disciplines and one college may focus on theology, for future bishops, as well as philosophy for future non-religious philosophers.

Worth noting that Oxford is also a ‘city university’ in that there isn’t a few building in a central location but teaching is spread out across the whole city, this is/was very common in the west. In the UK you’ll often hear ‘university towns’ meaning the whole town or town centre is essentially the university campus.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 08:29 AM   #34
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Oxford was always governed by a chancellor, it was ‘one piece’ from the beginning. Each college has a dean to manage that subject, each college was essentially the equivalent of a department in a modern university. Lines were slightly blurred between disciplines and one college may focus on theology, for future bishops, as well as philosophy for future non-religious philosophers.

Worth noting that Oxford is also a ‘city university’ in that there isn’t a few building in a central location but teaching is spread out across the whole city, this is/was very common in the west. In the UK you’ll often hear ‘university towns’ meaning the whole town or town centre is essentially the university campus.
exactly because it was a city university, the role of the chancellor is not well defined at the very beginning.

it would be easy to find other examples of collections of education organizations in a form of united colleges. but they do not necessarily form a university.

oxford certainly is one of the oldest universities. but if you tell it was a university as its very beginning. i don't really think so.

Last edited by heylouis; May 17th, 2017 at 08:32 AM.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 08:32 AM   #35

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Oldest university
The city of Timbuktu and the first university in the world
Number two morocco Fez city
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Old May 17th, 2017, 09:42 AM   #36
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As far as I know, the Warring States were too busy making war against each other to be very much concerned with education!
Warring States lasted over two centuries. They were not at war at all times.

State of Qi sponsored Jixia Academy. What was it doing?
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Old May 17th, 2017, 09:59 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Warring States lasted over two centuries. They were not at war at all times.

State of Qi sponsored Jixia Academy. What was it doing?

No, they were not at war all the time; but neither were they famous for educational initiatives.

Of course, occasionally some academic sponsorship occured. Formal education did always continue in China, even under the most perilous circumstances such as An Lushan's rebellion. But I wonder how much of it might have been privately funded and organized.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 10:58 AM   #38
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I am fascinated by the Han and T'ang Dynasties. Could you please send some info about the royal academy? Thanks.
Its pretty hard to get information on the Imperial Academy of Luoyang, a lot of it is behind academic paywalls.

This can give some good basic information.
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Old May 17th, 2017, 11:36 AM   #39
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As far as I know, the Warring States were too busy making war against each other to be very much concerned with education! In Japan, with the decline of the refined Heian culture and the universal spread of military government, the level of public education drastically declined until it was finally brought back to high standards in the Edo period.
Are you talking about the Warring States period in China? That was between 432 and 221 BCE. In any event, records of schools established by the government exist since at least the Western Zhou period, between 1046 and 771 BCE. The question really is, what constitutes a university?
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Old May 17th, 2017, 11:43 AM   #40
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Depends on your definition of a "university". University of Bologna 1088 AD is the oldest to be called a "universitas", and seems to be the oldest to have all the elements that are part of modern universities - formal degeee granting, established curriculum, exams,. While rhe Daigakuryo met most of these elements, I don't thing*it granted formal degrees with a diploma. Did it have exams?
The Kuo-tsu-chien (國子監) in Sui and T'ang China met all these criteria.
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Originally Posted by Bart Dale View Post
Also, it seems that Daigakuryo was a one off institution. The medieval Europe univerisities were part of a chain of institutions, and professors could and did travel between univerisities.
Yet this detracts the status of the University of Bologna as a university at founding, since before the second university existed, professors by definition cannot travel between universities, simply because only one existed.
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