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Old September 2nd, 2017, 03:24 AM   #1

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What's RELEVANT about the Qara Khitai?


I wrote a blog post on them. I'm not really sure if what I've gathered is completely historical (and I'd love to get peoples input) as well as exposing any holes that I have missed.

But really, what is the main relevance in your opinion? From what I've gotten is that they were a less conquering version of the Mongols. However, that didn't mean that they didn't continue to do raiding after Yelu Dashi ('founder') migrated west.
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Old September 2nd, 2017, 04:43 AM   #2

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I think they were important because they pushed the Seljuqs out of Transoxiana after Qatwan, thereby further weakening the already divided Seljuq state. They also subdued the eastern Karakhanids, something that the Seljuqs failed to do, thus fatally weakening the Karakhanids who never truly recovered.
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Old September 2nd, 2017, 05:44 AM   #3

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Great blog post. You might be interested in this:

Click the image to open in full size.

It's a copy of an inscription that was printed on Western Liao paper money. It says "Peace be unto men and horses."

Here's an example of Western Liao paper money. The block of text mentions that counterfeiters will be decapitated and the people who turn them in will receive 800 tales of silver. The denomination is 10 strings of cash (10,000 coppers)

Click the image to open in full size.

Last edited by stevapalooza; September 2nd, 2017 at 05:47 AM.
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Old September 3rd, 2017, 06:33 AM   #4

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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevapalooza View Post
Great blog post. You might be interested in this:

Click the image to open in full size.

It's a copy of an inscription that was printed on Western Liao paper money. It says "Peace be unto men and horses."

Here's an example of Western Liao paper money. The block of text mentions that counterfeiters will be decapitated and the people who turn them in will receive 800 tales of silver. The denomination is 10 strings of cash (10,000 coppers)

Click the image to open in full size.
Thanks for reading.

Wow, that sounds pretty interesting! And it does reverberate with a lot of what the Mongols did with their 'Yassa'.
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Old September 11th, 2017, 08:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevapalooza View Post
Great blog post. You might be interested in this:

Click the image to open in full size.

It's a copy of an inscription that was printed on Western Liao paper money. It says "Peace be unto men and horses."

Here's an example of Western Liao paper money. The block of text mentions that counterfeiters will be decapitated and the people who turn them in will receive 800 tales of silver. The denomination is 10 strings of cash (10,000 coppers)

Click the image to open in full size.
Thanks

Fascinating
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