Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > Asian History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Asian History Asian History Forum - China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia, New Zealand, and the Asia-Pacific Region


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old September 11th, 2017, 08:00 AM   #31
Citizen
 
Joined: Sep 2017
From: Bangalore
Posts: 17

chachaji, I am also a brahmin. I always thought the heat and humidity of india played a major role in the brahmin transformation from warrior to priest. Our genes and skin is more suited to the steppes. I am no expert but this is the simplest explanation i could come up with.
maratha is offline  
Remove Ads
Old September 11th, 2017, 08:15 AM   #32

rvsakhadeo's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2012
From: India
Posts: 7,563

I am reminded of the struggle ( described in so many Purana s ) of Vishwamitra a sage who was born a Kshatriya to become a Brahmin , by penance and thereby by the grace of God . And in the process he causes tremendous hardships to the King of Varanasi ( aka Benares, North India ), Harishchandra and his devout wife Taramati and their young son Rohidas.A hot tempered sage, he is unable to divest the King of his Merit and unable to deflect the King from his straight and narrow path of truthfulness. In the end he admits his defeat to the sage Vasishtha, born a Brahmin, whom he hates. As a result of the defeat, Vishwamitra loses the merit of thousands of years of his penance !
rvsakhadeo is offline  
Old September 11th, 2017, 08:27 AM   #33
Scholar
 
Joined: Mar 2015
From: Yorkshire
Posts: 883

Thank you gentlemen - very interesting.

I am reading the History of India by Michael Wood but I can see I will have to read a lot more.

Actually one of my grandfathers, Quartermaster with Welch Regiment, is buried in India. After surviving the horrors of the Somme and Passchendaele, he succumbed to typhoid in 1920 at Ferozpur.
peccavi is offline  
Old September 11th, 2017, 08:42 AM   #34

rvsakhadeo's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2012
From: India
Posts: 7,563

Brahmins of the western India coastal strip ( called Konkan ) have been distinguished by lighter skin, actually quite fair in many families and grey or blue-grey or blue eyes, shorter and frailer structure. I belong to that caste of Brahmins called ' Chitpavan' or ' Konkanastha ' Brahmins. Though, I am not so fair, in fact quite brown and have dark eyes.
The well known film star Madhuri Dixit, with her blue-gray eyes and fair complexion is a prime example of Chitpavan Brahmin beauty.
The legendary sage Parshuram, whose story spans several Puranas and is mentioned in the Ramayana also, was well versed in Archery as well as in Vedic knowledge. He was away from his home in the forest, in order to learn some knowledge. When he was away, the Kshatriya King Sahasrarjuna visited the Ashram ( forest house-cum-academy ) of his father Jamadagni and requested Jamadagni to part with his sacred cow Kamadhenu, who was possessing powers to grant all the wishes of her owner. On refusal of Jamadagni to give him the cow, the King forcibly took away the cow and killing the parents of Parshuram in the process. After Parshuram returned he saw the devastation and swore to take revenge on all Kshatriyas of the earth.
He then single handedly defeated and killed all the kings, all being Kshatriyas, and their progeny, not leaving a single Kshatriya alive. He is supposed to have done this in various areas of the planet totally 21 times ! Some Kshatriyas saved themselves by hiding themselves in crowds of women.
rvsakhadeo is offline  
Old September 11th, 2017, 08:49 AM   #35

rvsakhadeo's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2012
From: India
Posts: 7,563

I cannot help offering my respects to our new poster Chachaji, an example of a venerable Brahmin, we other Brahmins and all other Indians should emulate.
Brahmin's duties are defined as Yajan, Yaajan and Adhyayan, Adhyapan. Meaning respectively to conduct the ritual of the sacred fire, to help someone else in conducting the ritual of the sacred fire, studying and teaching. We have to learn a lot from Chachaji.
rvsakhadeo is offline  
Old September 11th, 2017, 08:59 AM   #36

rvsakhadeo's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2012
From: India
Posts: 7,563

Quote:
Originally Posted by peccavi View Post
How does this tally with the East India Company's preference for recruiting Brahmins for its Bengal Army?

I was under the impression that this was due to them being larger and fitter than the average of the population of Bengal.
Brahmins were not heftier or stronger. They were actually shorter and frailer than most other Indians. But they could live with discipline and were fond of rules and thus well suited to the military life. They were also very good learners and steadfast in their duties. So there were many Brahmins in the pre-1857 army of the East India Company. Take the prime example of Mangal Pandey, the Brahmin soldier of that army who rebelled first in the 1857 war of Independence ( invariably called the Sepoy Mutiny by the British ). After the rebellion was crushed, it was as a matter of policy that Brahmins who were nationalistic Indians, were not to be employed in the Indian Army or even the Indian Police.
rvsakhadeo is offline  
Old September 11th, 2017, 09:20 AM   #37

Aupmanyav's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2014
From: New Delhi, India
Posts: 2,180

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bullit View Post
Mmm oh okay. And may I ask why you insist on pronouncing "Mohjenjo Daro" in the way you do it? I mean the site is named after a village adjacent to it in Sindh, Pakistan. That village was called and is still called Mohenjo Daro. So I find it strange why you change the name. Just intriqued why you do that?
Sure, there is, but what is the meaning of the name? Perhaps the name is a distortion of Moyan-jo-dero. That it was a dead city might have been in the folk memory. Or it could be some Mohan's (Krishna's) dero - Mohan-jo-dero? What do you think about that?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bullit View Post
See the link below for class composition in 1918 just after WW1.

https://i.imgur.com/9IXcVLv.jpg
You see, the Hindu brahmins and traders may not have been interested in a military career. The Rajputs had converted to Islam in Punjab, so that does not leave amny Hindus interested in a military career except the Dogras. That is why the less numbers.

Last edited by Aupmanyav; September 11th, 2017 at 09:27 AM.
Aupmanyav is online now  
Old September 11th, 2017, 09:56 AM   #38

Bullit's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2016
From: Indus Valley, Pakistan
Posts: 1,230

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aupmanyav View Post
Sure, there is, but what is the meaning of the name? Perhaps the name is a distortion of Moyan-jo-dero. That it was a dead city might have been in the folk memory. Or it could be some Mohan's (Krishna's) dero - Mohan-jo-dero? What do you think about that?
Maybe but there is no way the name can be same as it was 7,000 years ago during IVC times. The name we use today is modern and derived from Mohenjo Daro as used in Sind so I can't see why the need for distorting it. It's like Harappa. That is just a village adjacent to which the site was uncovered and thus the name became famous.

Quote:
You see, the Hindu brahmins and traders may not have been interested in a military career. The Rajputs had converted to Islam in Punjab, so that does not leave amny Hindus interested in a military career except the Dogras. That is why the less numbers.
True.
Bullit is offline  
Old September 11th, 2017, 10:38 AM   #39

Bullit's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2016
From: Indus Valley, Pakistan
Posts: 1,230

Okay guy's how many Brahmins are there in India and are they conspicious in their phenotype from average Indians?
Bullit is offline  
Old September 11th, 2017, 11:25 AM   #40
Citizen
 
Joined: Sep 2017
From: Bangalore
Posts: 17

Not really Mr.Bullit. I am from the Deshashta Brahmin community. Many of my relatives are pretty dark. But as Sakhdeo sir pointed out the Chitpavan Brahmins look foreign to my eyes. In all Brahmins range from super dark to super white in the Pancha Dravida sphere.
I believe that is the same in north india as well.
maratha is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > Asian History

Tags
brahmins, civilization, indian, kshatriyas



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why didn't Indian civilization spread to its west? kandal Asian History 168 July 8th, 2017 07:17 AM
Indian Ethnicity and civilization. Aham Brahmasmi Asian History 54 December 18th, 2016 12:59 PM
Are there no mentions of pre Mauryan Indian kings in other civilization's records greatstreetwarrior Asian History 12 December 19th, 2015 03:13 AM
What were the major Indian influences in Greek culture and civilization greatstreetwarrior Asian History 14 December 14th, 2015 07:43 PM
Indus Valley Civilization is a Pakistani Heritage, Not Indian Ticker Asian History 7 May 31st, 2013 11:47 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.