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Old January 16th, 2018, 10:19 PM   #51

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Are other examples of Tokugawa utilizing temple to regulate citizen population? Could Tokugawa citizen can register at any temple? How Tokugawa lock Tokugawa citizen into Buddhist funeral with temple registration?

Is anymore to say on scholarship? ‘Government’ mean (central) Bakufu?
No, and we see that from the example of Tanaka Sahei who wanted to change his temple affiliation from Zenjo-ji of the Soto sect to Honmyo-ji of the Nichiren sect. Although technically it was possible for someone to break their ties to a family temple under the bakufu law, it wasn't really practiced. In fact, the Kumamoto Domain (the domain in which Sahei lived) appealed to Jisha-bugyo for a solution and Sahei was stripped of his title and put under house arrest. This shows the government's fear of setting precedents on individual choice of a temple or a sect.
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Old January 17th, 2018, 03:56 PM   #52
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And new Buddhist schools came to Japan, such as Obaku which was established in 1620s and spread through Japan thanks to the efforts of people like Itsunen Shoyu and Ingen.
Did citizens register to the entire sect or register to a local temple (with no right to reregister with another temple of the same sect)?

Manpuku Temple was established in 1661, and if there's no right to change registration within your own sect, well, at bare minimum, the clergy would've needed to change their registrations, or, they were officially registered at other temples, but practiced a different religion.

How did change in registration work if someone move or marry?
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Old January 18th, 2018, 03:54 PM   #53
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If anyone want better idea on scale of sohei.

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In the Jodo-shu, Ryoyo (1341-1420) developed the idea that the Pure Land is in fact everywhere, and is to be entered by a changed attitude of mind during life, rather than at death. In the Jodo-shin-shu, the ‘second founder’, Rennyo (1415-99), opposed a strand of thought which said that moral conduct was irrelevant to those with faith in Amida. He stressed that sincere faith implied a pure heart, and that a morale life expressed gratitude to Amida. He taught that other schools should not be criticized, but that Amida alone should be worshipped as the ‘original Buddha’ who includes all others. That is, Amida was the embodiment of the Dharma-body.

Jodo-shin-shu became centered on fortified temples, with its armed followers acting to defend the faith. In the last century of the Ashikaga period, the sect organized and led peasant uprisings and became the ruling power in one region of Japan. Tendai and Shingon also maintained troops, some of them monks, and in the sixteenth century Nichiren Buddhists attacked the Shin and Tendai headquarters before being defeated (BP.19). Such un-Buddhist behavior can perhaps be seen as the product of violent times where political power was up for grabs and ambition rose to the surface. However, the idea that violence might be used in defence of the Dharma – which people would not unnaturally come to see as defence of the Dharma as understood by their sects – had unfortunately been expressed in sections of the Mahayana Mahaparinirvana Sutra.

Harvey, Peter. An Introduction to Buddhism: Teachings, History and Practices, 2nd edition. Cambridge University Press, 2013. Page 234
I repeat from my post 5: 'Not only Daimyo capitalized on the weakened Shogunate.'

Last edited by nakamichi; January 18th, 2018 at 03:57 PM.
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Old January 18th, 2018, 03:56 PM   #54
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But I;m actually interested in book for this.

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In 1614, Buddhism was made the established Church and arm of the state, with all people having to register and attend at their temple.

Harvey, Peter. An Introduction to Buddhism: Teachings, History and Practices, 2nd edition. Cambridge University Press, 2013. Page 235
Am I read right? Is rule they register at nearest temple? With no choice of sect?

If so, that answers much, including concerns in above post.
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Old January 18th, 2018, 10:33 PM   #55

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Did citizens register to the entire sect or register to a local temple (with no right to reregister with another temple of the same sect)?
They registered to one temple, and as I have already shown in a previous post, the government and the temples themselves weren't too keen to allow someone to change a temple.

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How did change in registration work if someone move or marry?
If someone leaves the village for marriage or service, that was also to be recorded, but generally peasants married from within their village. Bakufu leaders promoted the ideal of village kyodotai which basically village community, cooperation etc.
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Old January 19th, 2018, 04:32 PM   #56
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They registered to one temple, and as I have already shown in a previous post, the government and the temples themselves weren't too keen to allow someone to change a temple.

If someone leaves the village for marriage or service, that was also to be recorded, but generally peasants married from within their village. Bakufu leaders promoted the ideal of village kyodotai which basically village community, cooperation etc.
Sure. But I wasn't sure if it was because of the sect or the temple. We still have the predicament of how a new temple can recruit a congregation. I searched for temple registration and going to the nearest temple. According to Wikipedia,

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A danka was registered at the closest temple regardless of its religious affiliations, so these became gradually less important. As a consequence of all these factors, differences among sects allowed by the government got watered down and Buddhism became more uniform, not least because the Shogunate had a say in matters of religious orthodoxy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danka_system
Unfortunately, the citation is in German, and I can't even get it to load.

Anyway, this may be the answer to the problem.
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Old January 20th, 2018, 01:41 PM   #57
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Are citizens permitted to attend temples outside of their registered ones?

Beyond funeral, what other rites is someone committed to at the temple they attend?

How were these temples financed? Did the congregation tithe? Did the Bakufu subsidize?
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Old January 21st, 2018, 01:02 AM   #58

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The financing of the temples was a complicated matter. Some large temples received money from the government and the priests in these large temples would receive stipends. Smaller temples relied on the members of the temple for money, and danka members were instrumental in financing many of these temples. Some temples with holy relics would be maintained by the members of the confraternity formed around the temple. There were other ways a temple could obtain money: renting land, offerings from pilgrims, selling medicine. There were many sources of income for a Buddhist temple.
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 03:33 PM   #59
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Smaller temples relied on the members of the temple for money, and danka members were instrumental in financing many of these temples.
Were donations from congregation mandatory?
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Old January 24th, 2018, 06:16 AM   #60

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Were donations from congregation mandatory?
I am not really sure that it was officially mandatory, but it was in practice. Anyone who failed to give something to the temple would be punished, and the temples did coerce their members into funding the temple, even threatening discrimination against those who failed to support the temple. People who failed to support the temple would also be threatened with the possibility of the temple refusing to perform funerary rites for their families.
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