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Old January 24th, 2018, 03:23 PM   #61
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I am not really sure that it was officially mandatory, but it was in practice. Anyone who failed to give something to the temple would be punished, and the temples did coerce their members into funding the temple, even threatening discrimination against those who failed to support the temple. People who failed to support the temple would also be threatened with the possibility of the temple refusing to perform funerary rites for their families.
I want to read more. Do you have a reference on this?
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Old January 24th, 2018, 03:24 PM   #62
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There were other ways a temple could obtain money: renting land, offerings from pilgrims, selling medicine.
Just curious, what type of medicine are we talking about? Chinese medicine?
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Old January 24th, 2018, 03:27 PM   #63
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The government enforced strict hierarchy on the Buddhist branches so that, by controlling the main temple, they could control the entire branch.
Concerning this relation between the main temple and its satellites, did funds move between? Main temple subsiding local satellite operations? Or local satellite sending profits back up to main branch?
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Old January 25th, 2018, 04:01 AM   #64

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I want to read more. Do you have a reference on this?
Stephen Grover Covell, Japanese Temple Buddhism: Worldliness in a Religion of Renunciation, p. 26-27

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Old January 30th, 2018, 02:30 PM   #65
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A number of daibutsu date to the Edo period, so there was no specific curtailment of Buddhism.
What does 'specific curtailment of Buddhism' mean and how does the construction of daibutsu imply that it did not occur?

I still stick by the belief that the bakufu took no action to curtail Buddhist membership, practice, and expansion. But bakufu curtailment of Buddhist political influence and autonomy is a different story, yes, that definitely happened.

Regardless, I do not understand what any of this has to do with daibutsus.

Please explain.
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