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Old November 21st, 2017, 11:19 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naomasa298 View Post
I hope this is posted in jest. I will be annoyed if it is not.
Reptilian Shapeshifter
Apparently that is one way for the Chinese/ Russian internet trolls to recognize each other.
For example, Haakbus, I guess, is a Chinese pretending to be a Korean. His colleague is of course nakamichi, I guess, a Chinese pretending to be a Japanese.
Or they could be same guy, I don't know.
So in a philosophical way, you might say that it's both in jest and not. They are working hard for their money.
Btw, you suck at being Deadpool. See above!
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Old November 26th, 2017, 08:33 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Maki View Post
Peasants who were forced to come to Korea to serve as ordinary soldiers and/or as laborers.
You might have misunderstood. I am not asking if Japanese laborers came to Korea. Toyotomi policy had divided the people of Momoyama Japan into three categories of Peasant, Merchant, and Samurai. Only the samurai demographic could carry words in the Momoyama Japan. 'Samurai' basically mean excusedfrom Toyotomi weapon collection in this context. Even bottom of barrel military grunts considered 'samurai'.

The Momoyama citizens could not move between their classes. Once peasant, always peasant. So the above queote is contradiction if they are both 'peasant' and 'ordinary soldier', at least when standing in Momoyama *Japan*. You may be right, Could *any* Japanese sent to Korea carry weapons?

You gave me what I asked for and I am thankful and not trying to argue. But I want a better understand of who we're talking about.
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Old November 26th, 2017, 08:42 AM   #13

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Well, yes, the ordinary people weren't allowed to carry swords like the samurai, but ordinary people were still conscripted into the army and they wielded weapons there, whether arquebuses or something else. I mean, Japan sent a pretty big army to Korea, it is impossible that all of them were samurai.
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Old November 26th, 2017, 08:54 AM   #14
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Last edited by Haakbus; November 26th, 2017 at 08:57 AM.
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Old November 27th, 2017, 03:56 PM   #15
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From historical record, there is a total of approximately 10,000 Japanese soldiers that have defected to the Korean side in the war. Sayaga was the first major defector, who abandoned Daimyo Kato after the victory at Busan Castle, with 3000 troops of his own. His reason was that he was a great admirer or Korean culture, and it was not right for Japan to assault Korea. It is notable that he defected when Japan was winning by a wide margin. He contributed much to the korean cause in the war, for his soldiers were elite gunners and he had knowledge of the Japanese tactics. Later on, when the war turned against Japanese favor, more people defected for various reasons. Sayaga received a title by the Korean court for his service, and even scored a victory for Korea against the invading Manchus. His descendants are very much alive today, and one of them is a politician in korea.
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Old November 28th, 2017, 03:45 PM   #16
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From historical record, there is a total of approximately 10,000 Japanese soldiers that have defected to the Korean side in the war.
Citation please.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 04:45 PM   #17
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Lessons from a Japanese defector-INSIDE Korea JoongAng Daily

What is this word "Hang-wae"? If writable in hanja, please share.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 05:02 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by nakamichi View Post
Lessons from a Japanese defector-INSIDE Korea JoongAng Daily

What is this word "Hang-wae"? If writable in hanja, please share.
The Hanja is 降倭 and basically means "surrendered Japanese".
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Old January 12th, 2018, 05:45 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Haakbus View Post
The Hanja is 降倭 and basically means "surrendered Japanese".
Thank you Haakbus,

Would use title under your name, but that get trouble once already.
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Old January 17th, 2018, 02:22 AM   #20
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There were also Korean defectors to the Japanese side, after the war the Chosun king had to make pardons to those defectors.
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