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Old December 28th, 2017, 09:11 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Aatreya View Post
Original Aryas were Vedic people who ate barley.

PIE were not Vedic. Although, certain Slavs can understand the word. They use the word to this day. 'Vedat' - to know. Po-vedat' - to tell something in details.

Original PIE did not have barley in their diet.
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Old December 28th, 2017, 09:47 PM   #42

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I get four references for Barley in Pokorny PIE Master Etyma (https://lrc.la.utexas.edu/lex/master):
29 albhi- albho- barley
111 bhares- IE bhar- barley
446 g̑herzd(h), genitive g̑hr̥zd(h)-es, g̑herzdā IE 2. g̑her- barley, prickly grain
512 i̯eu̯o- IE grain, esp. barley

The first two gave rise to the word Barley in Indo-European: https://lrc.la.utexas.edu/lex/master/0193,

The third gave rise to the word for Barley in Gerst (Dutch), Gersta (Old Saxon, Old High German) and Gerste (German), Hordeum (Latin), κρῖ (Homeric Greek) and κρῑθαί (Greek): https://lrc.la.utexas.edu/lex/master/0667

The fourth gave rise to the word Jo (Iranian) and Yava (Sanskrit): https://lrc.la.utexas.edu/lex/master/0791 (Origin of the name of Zhob river in Pakistan)

That also shows the divisions of the migrating Indo-Europeans (as to which party went where).

Last edited by Aupmanyav; December 28th, 2017 at 10:55 PM.
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Old December 28th, 2017, 10:01 PM   #43
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The place where PIE originated could not have barley. It would not grow there without help of modern technology. PIE were pastoralists.
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Old December 28th, 2017, 11:01 PM   #44

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I suppose I have quoted this before also: "Barley (Hordeum vulgare), a member of the grass family, is a major cereal grain grown in temperate climates globally. It was one of the first cultivated grains, particularly in Eurasia as early as 10,000 years ago."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barley

"The place where PIE originated could not have barley." What makes you say that? Where do you think PIE originated?

However, the word *bhares- has a connection to India also. "One which fills, sustains" to our legendary Emperor Bharata, to Lord Rama's brother, Bharata, the official name of our country "Bharat" and the mythological great war that a family fought in North India, "Mahabharata", i.e, 'the great war of India'. The word 'Bhar' means to fill, just as barley filled the stomach of PIE speakers.

Last edited by Aupmanyav; December 28th, 2017 at 11:12 PM.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 05:29 AM   #45

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Right. I'm going to bhar myself up with some bharley juice now. I need the cooling.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 05:45 AM   #46

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The weather over here has been a bit crazy for a while.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 10:16 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aupmanyav View Post
I suppose I have quoted this before also: "Barley (Hordeum vulgare), a member of the grass family, is a major cereal grain grown in temperate climates globally. It was one of the first cultivated grains, particularly in Eurasia as early as 10,000 years ago."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barley

"The place where PIE originated could not have barley." What makes you say that? Where do you think PIE originated?

However, the word *bhares- has a connection to India also. "One which fills, sustains" to our legendary Emperor Bharata, to Lord Rama's brother, Bharata, the official name of our country "Bharat" and the mythological great war that a family fought in North India, "Mahabharata", i.e, 'the great war of India'. The word 'Bhar' means to fill, just as barley filled the stomach of PIE speakers.
Now Aupmanyav , dont tell us Barley grows in Arctic
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Old December 29th, 2017, 10:18 AM   #48
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The weather over here has been a bit crazy for a while.
What sort of crazy ? We are having mild heat to hot, afternoon storms and .... lots of cicadas.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 12:38 PM   #49

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^
Just crazy by our standards. Alternating between unpredictable raining days & then intensely hot weather. Maybe mild by yours, I guess.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 05:12 PM   #50

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It is nice and cold here. Lots of snow in Kashmir and Himalayas.
Quote:
Originally Posted by specul8 View Post
Now Aupmanyav, dont tell us Barley grows in Arctic
There is wild grass in Tundra also. Grains are but grass seeds. The Sami eat cloudberry. And there was fish (Jhash in modern Sanskrit, I do not know how PIE people temed it). They may have depended more on non-vegetarian fare. No one starved in Aryanem Vaejo, the Urheimat.

"Rubus chamaemorus is a rhizomatous herb native to cool temperate, alpine, arctic tundra and boreal forest, producing amber-colored edible fruit similar to the raspberry or blackberry. English common names include cloudberry, bakeapple (in Newfoundland and Labrador), knotberry and knoutberry (in England), aqpik or low-bush salmonberry (in Alaska - not to be confused with true salmonberry, Rubus spectabilis), and averin or evron (in Scotland)."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_chamaemorus

"Russians seem to have learned to make pel'meni from Finnic and Tatar peoples of the Taiga, the Urals and Siberia. The word means "ear-shaped bread" in Finnic languages such as Udmurt and Komi. In Siberia they were made in large quantities and stored safely frozen outside for several winter months. In mainland Russia, the term "Siberian Pel'meni" refers to pel'meni made with a mix of meats (whether the 45/35/20 mix mentioned above, pork, lamb, beef, or another ratio), rather than a single meat."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_cuisine#Meat

Please note I am searching things and not claiming anything.

Last edited by Aupmanyav; December 29th, 2017 at 05:36 PM.
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