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Old November 10th, 2011, 01:02 AM   #11

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Originally Posted by Naomasa298 View Post
Fuji-san, not Fuji-yama.
fuji-san or fuji-yama what ever. 山 on-yomi サン kun-yomi やま both can be used.
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Old November 10th, 2011, 01:04 AM   #12

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fuji-san or fuji-yama what ever. 山 on-yomi サン kun-yomi やま both can be used.
No. Japanese people do not use the kunyomi in this case. Mount Fuji is always referred to as Fujisan, never Fujiyama.
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Old November 10th, 2011, 01:10 AM   #13

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Ahhh! 富士山. Those postcards were deceiving then!

(i will though keep that name in my memory -you know, childhood memories always persist)
ありがとうございます。

Not exactly. 富士 is an ateji, in the sense kanji character which has the equivalent sound of the word. When translated fuji , it means a wealthy respectable person.

another example of ateji

USA アメリカ(a-me-ri-ka) ateji 亜米利加 the kanji is chosen in such a way that is sound like amerika and each character gives different meaning.
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Old November 10th, 2011, 01:11 AM   #14
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What's the difference in the meaning? Why is kunyomi used in that case?
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Old November 10th, 2011, 01:14 AM   #15

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No. Japanese people do not use the kunyomi in this case. Mount Fuji is always referred to as Fujisan, never Fujiyama.
Did you find any other facts or piece of info about the original name of Japan ?
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Old November 10th, 2011, 01:17 AM   #16

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No. Japanese people do not use the kunyomi in this case. Mount Fuji is always referred to as Fujisan, never Fujiyama.

This is where the problem occur. The extensive use of on-yomi make the kun-yomi to get extinct and we can not establish relationship between the Japanese and the other language family.
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Old November 10th, 2011, 01:33 AM   #17

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What's the difference in the meaning? Why is kunyomi used in that case?
It's just one of the quirks of the language, there's no difference in meaning as such. Onyomi is used in some cases, and kunyomi in others. Generally, onyomi is used for words that originated in other languages, and Fuji may have been given its name during the classical period when the language of the court was Chinese, although that's just speculation on my part.
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Old November 10th, 2011, 01:34 AM   #18

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This is where the problem occur. The extensive use of on-yomi make the kun-yomi to get extinct and we can not establish relationship between the Japanese and the other language family.
It simply depends on the word. I have never personally seen anything that suggests one is more prevalent than the other.
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Old November 10th, 2011, 01:39 AM   #19

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Did you find any other facts or piece of info about the original name of Japan ?
No, I didn't. As you didn't reply to my original post, I didn't think you were interested.
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Old November 10th, 2011, 02:02 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Naomasa298 View Post
It's just one of the quirks of the language, there's no difference in meaning as such. Onyomi is used in some cases, and kunyomi in others. Generally, onyomi is used for words that originated in other languages, and Fuji may have been given its name during the classical period when the language of the court was Chinese, although that's just speculation on my part.
So it is just a reading/writing system and it does not affect meaning, if I got that right.

What about style? I mean, when both systems are possible, is there a style difference? Such as, say, polite style, familiarity, origins or whatever else?
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