Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > Asian History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Asian History Asian History Forum - China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia, New Zealand, and the Asia-Pacific Region


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 15th, 2012, 07:10 PM   #11

1991sudarshan's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2011
From: São Tomé de Meliapore
Posts: 1,714

It is from Tibet for sure. On the top Buddha is in a seat potion on Peetam. Three srichakras are there and in the bottom Tibetan script is there .
1991sudarshan is online now  
Remove Ads
Old January 16th, 2012, 12:23 AM   #12

AlpinLuke's Avatar
Knight-errant
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Lago Maggiore, Italy
Posts: 9,240
Blog Entries: 13

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiaitaDoc View Post
Tibetan sounds about right, although I'm not sure I see the relationship to a thangka - unless it's meant as a printed representation of a really complex one?

Anyway, I checked the Tibetan number system, and it corresponds to what I thought were the numbers in the magic square at the centre of the zodiac ring:

Click the image to open in full size.

The numbers in the magic square are ordered

4 9 2
3 5 7
8 1 6

Taking into account basic "font" differences, the numbers are definitely Tibetan - which means the rest of the text may be Tibetan as well.
Yes DiaitaDoc, just for a comparison, I suggest to google images about that form of art.

Sure modern tanka are well more colored and complicated, anyway there is something in that drawing which remains the general structure.

But

it can be a form of artistic representation of aspects of the cult [I don't think to a prayer, like the one they hang to ropes, at least until someone doesn't translate the text].
AlpinLuke is online now  
Old January 16th, 2012, 12:38 AM   #13

MrKap's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 2,242

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiaitaDoc View Post
4 9 2
3 5 7
8 1 6

If that's the right order, every row adds up to 15. I don't know if that was already known, or obvious because that's what a magic square is supposed to be, or what.
MrKap is offline  
Old January 16th, 2012, 03:14 AM   #14

AlpinLuke's Avatar
Knight-errant
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Lago Maggiore, Italy
Posts: 9,240
Blog Entries: 13

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrKap View Post
If that's the right order, every row adds up to 15. I don't know if that was already known, or obvious because that's what a magic square is supposed to be, or what.
Also the two diagonals give 15 es result ...

8+5+2 = 15
4+5+6 = 15
AlpinLuke is online now  
Old January 19th, 2012, 05:01 PM   #15
Citizen
 
Joined: Jan 2012
From: Zhuhai,China
Posts: 3
The square is called "洛书" in China


Quote:
Originally Posted by MrKap View Post
If that's the right order, every row adds up to 15. I don't know if that was already known, or obvious because that's what a magic square is supposed to be, or what.
This square is a part of Yi,its name is "洛书(means the paper form Luo river)".It has large infruence in medicine,astronomy,agriculture,augury,math and ect in China.
howmoney is offline  
Old January 19th, 2012, 06:45 PM   #16

ghostexorcist's Avatar
Scholar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
From: Midwest
Posts: 676
Blog Entries: 59

Although there are many Chinese elements, I'm inclined to believe that it is Tibetan, at least stylistically. Apart from the Tibetan script, other elements in the picture point to this. For instance, the fiery beast around the zodiac is not a dragon, but King Mara. It is a play on a Buddhist Wheel of Life, which are popular in Tibetan Buddhist art. The same goes for the circle on the bottom right. Here is a piece that I own:

Click the image to open in full size.


Also, the three figures in the top resemble various Tibetan Buddhist deities. The top looks like some kind of a Tara (see here). The figure on the bottom left looks like Vajrapani. Here is another piece that I own:

Click the image to open in full size.

In addition, the symbols between the two bottom circles are found in a book I have seen on recurring symbols in Tibetan art. The phurba dagger in the middle is the most obvious.
ghostexorcist is offline  
Old February 23rd, 2012, 05:59 PM   #17

ghostexorcist's Avatar
Scholar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
From: Midwest
Posts: 676
Blog Entries: 59

The Encyclopedia of Tibetan Symbols and Motifs says that this is called the "Golden Tortoise Diagram." Legend states that the Bodhisattva Manjusri inscribed the essence of his religious knowledge on the belly of a golden tortoise.
ghostexorcist is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > Asian History

Tags
artifact, mystery


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
1873 Thames Torso Mystery (aka 'Battersea Mystery') halomanuk European History 14 June 27th, 2011 11:07 PM
Most Valuable Artifact jegates General History 18 December 16th, 2010 09:06 AM
Artifact identification. robow History Help 0 October 24th, 2010 11:27 AM
Do you think you own an American historical artifact? liz.lovern American History 0 March 10th, 2008 11:25 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.