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Old February 7th, 2012, 06:02 PM   #31

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Cool thread. What are the periods of some of these weapons?

Caltrops are very common throughout the ancient world. The Greeks used them to deter calvary as well.

Most of these weapons were actually medieval weapons from Tang Dynasty (618-907) and Sung Dynasty (960-1279).

A few of them, such as the caltrops, could be dated back to the Warring States period (475BC-221BC).

The anti-siege flame bomb was used during Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).
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Old February 9th, 2012, 07:57 AM   #32

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Ceramic grenades like this one in the picture were also commonly used by the ancient Chinese armies during Sung and Ming dynasties. Basically, the ceramic grenade was a ceramic pot with several spikes on it. It was filled with gunpowder and other flammable substances. The ancient Chinese soldiers would throw the ceramic grenade towards the besieging enemies. When exploded, the ceramic shrapnels could injure the enemy soldiers nearby.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 01:39 PM   #33

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Do you know what the cords were made of?
Cords for these were as purakjella said, similar to that of bow strings. Bow strings were typically made of hemp (although bamboo fibers were used very early in Chinese history, they later switched to hemp), which these cords likely were. There's some speculation that they may have been a composite material, combining silk and hemp together.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 04:20 PM   #34

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Thanks Thegn.

Purak, any idea how the grenade was made to explode? Did it have a fuse like dynamite?
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Old February 9th, 2012, 05:02 PM   #35

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Thanks Thegn.

Purak, any idea how the grenade was made to explode? Did it have a fuse like dynamite?
They would probably use a fuse to ignite the gunpowder inside the grenade.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 09:44 AM   #36

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Shields were used throughout Chinese history. Earlier types of Chinese shields were made of wood, leather, or bronze, while later they were made of iron. During Ming and Qing dynasties, rattan shields were also commonly used by Chinese infantrymen.

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The picture above shows a bronze shield used during Qin Dynasty.


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The picture above shows a clay figurine of the Northern and Southern Dynasties. This clay figurine depicts a shield-bearer holding a scutum.

Last edited by purakjelia; February 17th, 2012 at 09:52 AM.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 10:29 AM   #37

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This shield was used during Ming Dynasty, and it was called Hu Tou Pai (Tiger Head Shield). The "Tiger Head" refers to the painting on the shield.

This shield deserves special attention not because of its shape, nor because of its painting. Notice that there are several rocket arrows attached to the shield, so it means that this shield could be used both for attack and for defence; it could be used as a platform for launching rocket arrows. Attaching rocket arrows to a shield seems to be a clever idea.

Last edited by purakjelia; February 17th, 2012 at 10:37 AM.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 02:48 PM   #38

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This shield was used during Ming Dynasty, and it was called Hu Tou Pai (Tiger Head Shield). The "Tiger Head" refers to the painting on the shield.

This shield deserves special attention not because of its shape, nor because of its painting. Notice that there are several rocket arrows attached to the shield, so it means that this shield could be used both for attack and for defence; it could be used as a platform for launching rocket arrows. Attaching rocket arrows to a shield seems to be a clever idea.
I so totally wish the Ming never ended D:
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Old February 17th, 2012, 03:13 PM   #39

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Originally Posted by purakjelia View Post
Shields were used throughout Chinese history. Earlier types of Chinese shields were made of wood, leather, or bronze, while later they were made of iron. During Ming and Qing dynasties, rattan shields were also commonly used by Chinese infantrymen.

Click the image to open in full size.

The picture above shows a bronze shield used during Qin Dynasty.


Click the image to open in full size.

The picture above shows a clay figurine of the Northern and Southern Dynasties. This clay figurine depicts a shield-bearer holding a scutum.
This thread just keeps getting better all the time. Any idea about the thickness, dimensions and weight of the shields? Were the steel shields smaller due to their weight?
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Old February 17th, 2012, 10:28 PM   #40

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The Qin bronze shield is actually quite small, about the size of a buckler barely covering your fist. This is because the shield is a miniaturized replica. A real "gourd-shaped" shield would be much bigger than a buckler, but smaller than a hoplon. I would say it's around the size of a phalangite's shield. Real gourd-shaped shields also weren't made of bronze. The replica is made of bronze because the entire chariot replica that the shield was found in is made of bronze. Chances are actual shields were mostly wood, while good ones had coatings of lacquer. Its small size convinces me that the shield is very offensive oriented. The curved sides allow the shield bearer to hook enemy weapons. When the shield is used to hit an opponent, the tip allows the entire mass of the shield to be concentrated at a single point. The vertical shield grip also confirms this. Of course, this is just personal speculation. Ancient Chinese texts do not go into detail about these matters.

Size comparison of a Han terracotta soldiers with gourd-shaped shields:
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