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Old October 13th, 2012, 09:45 AM   #1

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How do today's Indians view the British period?


I've noticed there's quite a good number of indian members on historum.

How is the british period and legacy viewed in today India? An entirely negative period? Or a good thing for the long period evolution of the country, due to all the changes brought by the british?

The answer is in the midle of these two extremes, but with what degree? And also, how much of the british culture is viewed as belonging to modern India?
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Old October 13th, 2012, 09:49 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The merchant of Venice View Post
I've noticed there's quite a good number of indian members on historum.

How is the british period and legacy viewed in today India? An entirely negative period? Or a good thing for the long period evolution of the country, due to all the changes brought by the british?

The answer is in the midle of these two extremes, but with what degree? And also, how much of the british culture is viewed as belonging to modern India?
I'd think it'd be comparable to the way in which american's view their colonial past. Some would be proud to have the heritage, others proud they kicked them out etc.

Most of my indian friends have duality with it. They see britian has a modernizing force, while at the same time, they understand very well the brutallity of the empire.
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Old October 15th, 2012, 04:24 AM   #3

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Originally Posted by Terranovan View Post
I'd think it'd be comparable to the way in which american's view their colonial past. Some would be proud to have the heritage, others proud they kicked them out etc.

Most of my indian friends have duality with it. They see britian has a modernizing force, while at the same time, they understand very well the brutallity of the empire.
The case is a bit different tough, since revolutionary americans were descendent of british colonists, while for India Britain was a complete foreign country
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Old October 15th, 2012, 04:31 AM   #4

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Most of British India was ruled by local princes wasn't it? What was the extent of British control over the princely states?
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Old October 15th, 2012, 04:32 AM   #5

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Like Indian history is a stranger to foreign rulers?

Technically speaking the Indian princes were completely independent and cooperated with British directly run areas, sort of a federal system. On the other hand the British installed a resident, sort of an Ambasador to guide the local guy and made sure that there was enough funds going to the local rulers to keep them fat, happy and not stirring up trouble.
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Old October 15th, 2012, 04:48 AM   #6

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I've spoken to a couple of Indian people who told me they preferred it when Britain ruled. I can't say I understand it, since independence is something I cherish, but the corruption and political problems they've encountered seem to have disappointed them.
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Old October 15th, 2012, 05:04 AM   #7
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I think that - as with so many ex-colonial countries - the key question is whether the people doing the discussing have any knowledge of the actual history. In almost all cases there were strong forces in the UK which were heavily on the side of freedom, and important forces in the particular colony who were learning from - in particular - English literature. I know that in our house when I was little the Mahatma and Pandit Nehru were regarded as 'our lot' in a way that Churchill, for instance, certainly wasn't.
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Old October 15th, 2012, 05:36 AM   #8

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Indians are not really proud of the british rule unlike the americans Indians didn't inherit the british heritage Americans were more or less colonizers, Yes this pride of being part of british rule is mostly held by the royal families , civil servants of British India who actually lost their privileges and had to give away their kingdoms to the Independent India
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Old October 15th, 2012, 08:03 AM   #9

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Indians are not really proud of the british rule unlike the americans Indians didn't inherit the british heritage Americans were more or less colonizers, Yes this pride of being part of british rule is mostly held by the royal families , civil servants of British India who actually lost their privileges and had to give away their kingdoms to the Independent India
But today, India has common law. Plus, it is arguable that India would have balkanized if the British hadn't shown up, as the Mughals were already cracking IIRC.
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Old October 15th, 2012, 08:06 AM   #10

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Here in Bangladesh, the British Raj is simply - forgotten.
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