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Old October 31st, 2012, 05:05 PM   #41

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Another story
In dwaapara yuga [ the third and penultimate yuga of the hindu scriptures] , a demon called NArakasura , who , with his boons , started pestering the people and then finally Indra , who seeks Krishna [ the yuga purusha of Dwaapara yuga ] .
Then Krishna wages a battle against the demon and slays him. In another version , as due to the boon Krishna cannot directly kill Narakasura. SO Krishna takes along Satyabhama[ his most loved wife] to the battle field where he just acts as he got hurt by the demon which infuriates Satya making her kill the demon.
Since the demon of darkness has been killed , the people rejoiced it by lighting lights[deepaas] and so it is called DEEPAWALI .....
Narakasura Narakasura
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Old November 1st, 2012, 05:03 AM   #42

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Originally Posted by manas teja View Post
Another story
In dwaapara yuga [ the third and penultimate yuga of the hindu scriptures] , a demon called NArakasura , who , with his boons , started pestering the people and then finally Indra , who seeks Krishna [ the yuga purusha of Dwaapara yuga ] .
Then Krishna wages a battle against the demon and slays him. In another version , as due to the boon Krishna cannot directly kill Narakasura. SO Krishna takes along Satyabhama[ his most loved wife] to the battle field where he just acts as he got hurt by the demon which infuriates Satya making her kill the demon.
Since the demon of darkness has been killed , the people rejoiced it by lighting lights[deepaas] and so it is called DEEPAWALI .....
Narakasura - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Narakasura gets a boon such that He can be killed only in the hands of a Mother. So Goddess Lakshmi the Mother of the Universe kills Him. That is how they tell in Tamil Nadu.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 12:54 PM   #43

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HAppy Diwali to everybody.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 05:26 PM   #44

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Happy Deepawali to you guys
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Old November 14th, 2012, 03:59 AM   #45

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Originally Posted by 1991sudarshan View Post
Narakasura gets a boon such that He can be killed only in the hands of a Mother. So Goddess Lakshmi the Mother of the Universe kills Him. That is how they tell in Tamil Nadu.
tales are subjected to geographical , terrestrial , societal ..... conditions ... so , it is not surprising

and happy deepawali guys .... belated
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Old November 14th, 2012, 08:19 AM   #46

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tales are subjected to geographical , terrestrial , societal ..... conditions ... so , it is not surprising

and happy deepawali guys .... belated
Yup you are right. There are many stories associated with the Deepawali.

Apart from the stories listed above there are some other stories as described below.

King Vikramaditya born on the day of Diwali (or may be ascended to the throne on that day) I forgot the exact story.

Lord Vishnu's 5th incarnation (or may be 4th) vamana liberated goddess Laxmi from the prison of the king Bali on the day of Diwali.

another story is that the Pandava's completed their 12 year long exile on the day of Diwali.

Besides while mentioning the Diwali people generally forget that Diwali isn't the festival of Hinduism only, it is celebrated by Jainism, Sikhism and some sects of Buddhism with equal enthusiasm and they all have their stories.

According to the Jain texts Mahavir (the last tirthankar of Jainism) attained Nirvana on the day of Diwali at Pavapuri. The gods who came to witness the event illuminated the whole Pavapuri at night. To mark these events people celebrate the Diwali by lighting the lamps.
(According to my Jain friends the event is recorded according Shak samvat which is 15 days behind the Vikram samvat. So in Gujarat we celebrate two Diwalis. One according to the Hindu tradition of Vikram samvat and another one is celebrated as Dev Diwali, 15 days after the original one on the day of Kartik purnima.


In Shikhism, The foundation of their major temple Harmandir sahib (Golden temple of Amritsar) was laid down on the day of Diwali. Also most probably their 3rd Sikh guru advised the people to gather at the same place and celebrate the Diwali to increase the unity among people. The 6th Sikh guru (Guru Hargobind singh) was released from the prison of Jahangir on the day of Diwali.

According to Buddhism, Ashoka converted to the Buddhism on the day of Diwali. Also they have some mythological story associated with the birth of some divine person who has healing power associated with light. However it isn't the major festival of buddhism.

So basically there are multiple reasons behind the celebration of Diwali.
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Old November 19th, 2012, 03:43 AM   #47

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Click the image to open in full size.

Nice image of Diwali night from Nahargarh Fort, Jaipur. It is from Angela Jonsson's Facebook Page so we can be sure that it has been photo shopped
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Old October 31st, 2013, 09:22 AM   #48

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Diwali


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Hello all,

Diwali/Deepavali/Deewali... however many other ways one spells it is almost upon us! I thought it might be fun to hear about Diwali customs from all over the place and what the meanings/significance of them are. What kinds of things do you do with your families, what does Diwali mean for you? Keeping in mind there are many regional variations and meanings for the festival.

Happy almost Diwali!

Last edited by BenSt; October 31st, 2013 at 09:25 AM.
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Old October 31st, 2013, 10:19 AM   #49

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Wish you happy Deepavali. I am from Tamil Nadu, by our tradition we don't light oil lamps during Deepavali though the name suggest that. Instead we light oil lamps during karthigai deepam festival.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karthikai_Deepam

This city is the leading producer of cracker in the whole of India.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sivakasi

By our tradition (South Indian Tamil Brahmin ), we should get our hair washed before the sun rise very very early in the morning . Deepavali falls on New moon (Amavasa) and by our tradition the children whose parents are still alive shouldn't get their hair washed on Amavasa. Before that Mothers or granny put Deepavali nalangu on the legs of others and after that we go for bath and then they do pooja or prayers, wear new cloths and then they proceed with bursting crackers and in the evening people go to temple.

According to our belief, the Goddess Ganga will be present in the Hot water only during Deepavali festival. On Deepavali , We take hot water showers.

Of lately, the trend is to watch new movies on television .

When I was in my school days , some christian missionary college and schools started this demonstration called sound less deepavali or cracker less deepavali. They said that, little children were forced to work in Cracker industry instead of sending them to school. And they asked or pressured the students studying in their institution to refrain from buying or bursting crackers. I don't know what gave the Christian missionaries the right of have their say in our culture and celebrations. But the movement totally flopped.

The state of Kerala is quite unique. They don't celebrate Deepavali at all. The Malayli members would be able to provide us the reason for that.

For them, it's only the onam festival that is very important

Deepavali nalangu

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Old October 31st, 2013, 10:20 AM   #50

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It is almost midnight here at Amravati, north central Maharashtra, India where I presently work so I will describe details of how we celebrate Diwali in our family in western Maharashtra, India, tomorrow. Meanwhile my heartiest greetings and pl.accept my best wishes for a happy and prosperous Diwali.

Last edited by rvsakhadeo; October 31st, 2013 at 10:25 AM.
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