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Old August 3rd, 2014, 12:33 AM   #1
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200 years before Tokugawa...


Im starting to explore period of 200 years before Tokugawa period and I dont understand political, social, economic and like situation in Japan. Its complex. So any help would be great.


1.What were the major battles leading to unification of Japan?
2. What were warlords, samurai, politicians, wives, ninjers beside Oda, Hideyoshi and Ieyasu Tokugawa, Hanzo...? Name any MVP which you consider important.
3. What were crucial events in period before Tokugawa shogunate?
4. Does Daimyos have had different customs, religion, traditions, philosophy on their castles and territory... different from others daimyos?
5.Name few battles where ninjers have had crucial effect?
6. Was it possible that Tokugawa didnt win at all?



Thanks.

Last edited by Vola; August 3rd, 2014 at 12:43 AM.
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Old August 3rd, 2014, 01:02 AM   #2

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vola View Post
Im starting to explore period of 200 years before Tokugawa and I dont understand political, social, economic and like situation in Japan. Its complex. So any help would be great.


1.What were the major battles leading to unification of Japan?
2. What were warlords, samurai, politicians, wives, ninjers beside Oda, Hideyoshi and Ieyasu Tokugawa, Hanzo...? Name any MVP which you consider important.
3. What were crucial events in period before Tokugawa shogunate?
4. Does Daimyos have had different customs, religion, traditions, philosophy on their castles and territory different from others daimyos?
5.Name few battles where ninjers have had crucial effect?
6. Was it possible that Tokugawa didnt win at all?



Thanks.
Oh dear, this is a very large topic that can't easily be answered in one post.

1. Lots and lots. Okehazama, Anegawa, Yamazaki, the Komaki campaign, and the most important one of all, Sekigahara.
2. There are far too many of these to name. Just a few of the more important include Mori Motonari, Hojo Ujiyasu, Takeda Shingen, Uesugi Kenshin, Date Masamune, Imagawa Yoshimoto, Miyoshi Chokei, Asai Nagamasa, Asakura Yoshikge, Chosokabe Motochika, Hosokawa Fujitaka, Otomo Sorin, Shimazu Yoshihisa, Shibata Katsuie, Kato Kiyomasa, Sanada Masayuki, Mogami Yoshiaki, Kobayakawa Takakage, Kikkawa Motoharu, Ankokuji Ekei, etc. etc. etc.

And that's just daimyo. It doesn't include certain other important figures such as tea master Sen no Rikyo or women such as Hosokawa Garasha.

As for ninjers, please read this:
Let's talk ninjas!

3. The Onin War, the rise of warlordism, the arrival of the Portuguese, Akechi Mitsuhide's betrayal and more.

4. Yes. Some were Christian, others belonged to different sects of Buddhism and were mutually hostile to one another. Each domain functioned as a self-contained kingdom in its own right, and had different laws.

5. First of all, it's "ninja". Secondly, none. Repeat after me, none. And read the thread above.

6. Entirely possible. A number of factors had to come into play to make Tokugawa's victory possible, including:
* Toyotomi Hideyori was too young to act as a leader when Hideyoshi died.
* All three of Mori Motonari's principal sons, Mori Takamoto, Kobayakawa Takakage and Kikkawa Motoharu had pre-deceased Hideyoshi, meaning that the nominal leader of the pro-Toyotomi forces at Sekigahara was Mori Terumoto, who lacked the will to act as an effective leader.
* That meant that it was down to Ishida Mitsunari to put together a coalition to oppose Tokugawa, and many of the daimyo hated him for his arrogance and high-handedness, and several natural Toyotomi allies switched sides.
* Including, crucially, Kobayakawa Hideaki, whose defection turned the tide of the battle of Sekigahara. Up until that point, the battle was undecided.

These threads will give you some good starting points:
Sengoku Jidai Timeline Part 1: Before the Onin War
Sengoku Jidai Timeline Part II: 1467-1500
100 Greatest Samurai

Feel free to ask any questions, but don't bombard us with lots at once, as there aren't short, simple answers. It's better to focus on one aspect at a time, otherwise you will get information overload.
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Old August 3rd, 2014, 01:36 AM   #3
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Wow, that's quite a lot to provide! The first thing I'll mention is that the Japanese Sengoku (Warring States) Period wasn't quite as long as you think. Two hundred years before the beginning of the Tokugawa period, the Ashikaga shogunate was at the height of its power and the country was pretty stable.

The Sengoku Period is usually dated as beginning in 1467, but a good argument can be made that it didn't actually begin until 1493. Either way, we're talking about a hundred years of history. And generally speaking, most people only care about what happened in the last fifty years, after unification began.

1. The battles of Itsukushima, Kawanakajima, Okehazama, Anegawa, Ishiyama Hongan-ji, Mikatagahara, Yamazaki, Shizugatake, Komaki, Nagashino, Mimigawa, Tedorigawa, Odawara, Sekigahara, and Osaka (Summer and Winter) are a good place to start, I think.
2. That could easily be hundreds of names, but I'll hit the big daimyo (from the latter part): Shimazu Yoshihisa, Otomo Sorin, Mori Motonari, Chosokabe Motochika, Amago Haruhisa, Miyoshi Nagayoshi, Asakura Yoshikage, Takeda Shingen, Uesugi Kenshin, Hojo Ujiyasu, and Date Masamune
3. The Kyōtoku Incident, the Onin War, the Meio Coup (how does this not have a Wikipedia entry!?), the assassination of Hosokawa Masamoto, the assassination of Oda Nobunaga and the scramble that followed, and the competition that followed Hideyoshi's death.
4. Sure. The Sengoku Period came out of the collapse of central authority, so each daimyo was forced to cobble together something out of their local situation. There was lots of innovation in terms of economics, politics, and military approaches.
5. None
6. Certainly. In fact, if asked in 1560 who was going to end up on top, I don't think anyone would have answered Ieyasu (or Motoyasu as he was then).

Sorry if a lot of that was just a list of things, but this is a massive topic!
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Old August 6th, 2014, 07:52 AM   #4

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It does irk me somewhat when someone requests a load of information, gets given it and doesn't bother to come back and reply.
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Old August 6th, 2014, 08:05 AM   #5

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I'm not the OP but I'm learning about Japan so Naomasa298 and cckerberos thank you for your answers.
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Old August 8th, 2014, 02:17 AM   #6
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ninjer...
what about the Third Great Shinobi War against Madara?
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