Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > Blogs
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read


Greetings,
(First off, I hope I am posting in the right place, if not I apologize- sooner or later I will get the hang of this)

As you can probably tell, I am a history lover. I teach it, I created a Website for it, and I had a really cool family that never threw anything away for hundreds of years (that might be a slight exaggeration).

My friends try to understand my love of history. I had one friend suggest to me that I might want to find a forum (I believe it was her goal to divert me to more like-minded people.) I hadn't imagined there was such a thing- but I am glad to be wrong.

In terms of interest- really anything goes. I teach Canadian history, so anything Canadian and World War related I would be glad to know about. I love ancient history and am currently riding a wave of investigation into the French Revolution- but really with history anything goes:-)

If you have any suggestions for me I would be very appreciative. It seems like a big world in here- YAY!

Cheers,
G
(P.S. Does everyone else see this crazed yellow happy face flogging a dead horse?)
Old

The Curious Combination of Beer and Mermaid

Posted January 8th, 2013 at 02:11 AM by Brushedwithmystery (Introduction)

Her tale is a tragic one: attempting to be something she is not, and losing the man she loves. In typical Disney fashion, her story is turned into a ‘happily ever after’ story. We know her as the “Little Mermaid,” her tale might be autobiographical for Hans Christian Andersen, who was also unlucky in love.


The Danish writer had this story published in 1837. In 1909 choreographer Hans Beck, and musician Fini Henriques, collaborated to put the fairy-tale on stage at the...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 250px-The_Little_Mermaid_statue.jpg (14.6 KB, 0 views)
Brushedwithmystery's Avatar
Academician
Posted in Uncategorized
Views 255 Comments 0 Brushedwithmystery is offline Edit Tags
Old

A First Hand Account of the Boston Tea Party from a Woman- Found it in the Basement

Posted January 5th, 2013 at 03:07 PM by Brushedwithmystery (Introduction)

(This is translated by me-it is written in cursive and not all words and spelling is clear). It is an excerpt from a document I )
inherited that focuses on an ancestor- Dorothea Gamsby. This is only one excerpt.)



Jack Smith was a short stout broad shouldered porter with a good humoured countenance, and so accustomed to carrying heavy burdens that my weight seemed no impediment, so he no sooner gained the street than I was hoisted on his shoulder, a seat...
Brushedwithmystery's Avatar
Academician
Views 303 Comments 1 Brushedwithmystery is offline Edit Tags
Old
Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average.

Y.B. Yeats: Irish Love

Posted January 5th, 2013 at 02:55 PM by Brushedwithmystery (Introduction)

She was his Helen of Troy; their tumultuous relationship would span almost twenty years. The characters in what would be an interesting play are Irish poet William Butler Yeats and politicial activist Maude Gonne. They met in 1889, he was an up and coming poet and she was an artist that was finding a voice in Irish nationalism. Both were in their early twenties. He proposed to her two years later, and she refused him, sighting his lack of political activism and refusal to become Roman Catholic...
Brushedwithmystery's Avatar
Academician
Views 503 Comments 0 Brushedwithmystery is offline Edit Tags
Old

T.S Eliot:Timeless Influence on a Modern Generation

Posted January 5th, 2013 at 02:48 PM by Brushedwithmystery (Introduction)

I happened to overhear a conversation between two of my drama students- they were supposed to present T.S. Eliot’s work in English that day, and they thought his poems were both boring and unintelligible. I interjected, and suggested that they look at him from a modern cultural standpoint-how have his poems affected and continue to influence modern culture? They seemed less than amused until I suggested that they look at modern music that might use, or be inspired by, his poetry. At the...
Brushedwithmystery's Avatar
Academician
Posted in Uncategorized
Views 303 Comments 0 Brushedwithmystery is offline Edit Tags
Old

The Titanic: Wallace Hartley's Violin

Posted January 5th, 2013 at 02:33 PM by Brushedwithmystery (Introduction)

Their story is the stuff of legends: while surrounded by chaos, human instinct said they should escape to save their own life, eight musicians serenaded the passengers with “Nearer My God to Thee,” as the ship broke in two and plunged into the abyss of the North Atlantic- a graveyard for 1, 524 passengers.
The RMS Titanic was heralded as the largest ship in the world, and boldly claimed to be unsinkable. There were only twenty lifeboats on board; in the world of 1912, only the rich and...
Brushedwithmystery's Avatar
Academician
Posted in Uncategorized
Views 824 Comments 0 Brushedwithmystery is offline Edit Tags
Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.