Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > Blogs
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read


  1. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    15 march

    Comment
    Posted July 16th, 2017 at 04:17 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
  2. Old Comment
    Solidaire's Avatar

    Salkantay Trail to Macchu Picchu

    Thank you Gile, people often find trips expensive, and some indeed are. But what you get in return! An investment that lasts a lifetime. I know how you feel after such an experience, an elation that lasts for months, and never really goes away, surfacing each time memory does its thing.

    Greetings from a fellow amateur (wannabe) explorer.
    Posted July 3rd, 2017 at 11:16 AM by Solidaire Solidaire is offline
  3. Old Comment
    Gile na Gile's Avatar

    Salkantay Trail to Macchu Picchu

    Yes Solidaire, her deadpan expression was priceless.

    Also a reminder to what extent so many Peruvians (particularly indigenous) are dependent on tourism; she may have been joking but the whole purpose of this type of stop off in our itinerary was to support local industry and I was amazed how "tight" some of our group were. Humming and hawing over sploshing out a mere tenner for a magnificent hand-woven alpaca blanket!!

    She simply made a pre-emptive strike on our stinginess. Personally, I couldn't buy enough of the stuff. I even got a separate alpaca carrier bag just to store it all. The economy is all about tourism in the highlands around Cusco so I figure if your going to shell out 3 or 4 grand for flights and accommodation you may as well be prepared to go some way towards redistributing the largesse to the local street hawkers - who as far as I could see made up the bulk of workers - especially the more creative ones. I bought a bunch of oil paintings, hand-carved statuettes, CDs from local musicians and the like. It's a mere truism to say the physical poverty is cruel at times to behold and we ARE self-evidently rolling in it by comparison; so be selective if you must ... but don't be niggardly.

    As far as 'cuisine' goes, as an unrepentant carnivore, I have to recommend the delicious highland guinea pig which generally arrives on the plate whole and skewered (paws, head and whiskers included -the full monty). If you can get over that (a big IF for some i'll warrant).... your in for a treat. Hard to describe the taste; a texture somewhere between chicken and steak but genuinely scrumptious. Locals in Cusco were fond of dissing the lowland guinea pigs (as found in Lima) whose meat bred in low altitudes is apparently far inferior. Sure enough, this is reflected in the price .. easily the most expensive fare on offer; twice the cost of a good sirloin for instance.

    Hope you get out there some day Solidaire; you'd be in your element and like myself I'm guessing, utterly absorbed in the sights and sounds, not to mention the clash of cultures played out daily on the tourist trail (lowland Spanish vs. highland Quechua). The struggle over "heritage" is not merely an Irish fixation as I constantly found out. As to prepping, Duolingo do a (free) Latin American Spanish course which is great to brush up on the basics while a 'good taster' to get the adventurous juices flowing would be The Conquest of the Incas' by John Hemmings - a brilliantly insightful and nuanced account which is sympathetic to natïve and conquistadore alike.

    Make the time, you'll never regret it.
    Posted June 29th, 2017 at 03:42 AM by Gile na Gile Gile na Gile is offline
    Updated June 29th, 2017 at 03:52 AM by Gile na Gile
  4. Old Comment

    Notes on the Celts

    As far as I can tell about half of Europe has celtic genetic ancestory.
    Posted June 21st, 2017 at 12:15 PM by Speedy64 Speedy64 is offline
  5. Old Comment
    St. Anselm's Avatar

    2013 Egypt coup d'Etat

    I don't quite know what to make of this blog post.
    Posted June 11th, 2017 at 10:38 PM by St. Anselm St. Anselm is offline
  6. Old Comment
    Solidaire's Avatar

    Salkantay Trail to Macchu Picchu

    "The bone of a tourist" hahaha, that was hilarious

    Thanks for sharing Gile, to be honest I was anticipating your impressions from this trip, I remember reading about your plans to go to the Andes some months ago, but then I forgot to check your blog. Thanks again, this is one of my most dreamt of destinations (this and Thibet). Sadly, lack of time, and lately of money too, keep postponing them further into the future.

    How were the locals? The culture? The cuisine? What made you think "wow, this is definitely a very different continent and culture altogether"?

    Also, Gile, why don't you make a forum thread about your trip, the people and country you visited? It would make a fresh interlude from all those recent hate threads, and we would be able to submit you to an endless barrage of questions.
    Posted June 4th, 2017 at 05:40 AM by Solidaire Solidaire is offline
  7. Old Comment
    ghostexorcist's Avatar

    Frankenstein Book Review

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Pedro View Comment
    You are welcome. But I must say your presentation was more scholarly than mine. I was mostly being tongue in cheek. Here´s an idea... why not cut and paste it to the thread. It would be a welcome addition.
    Thanks. I certainly will.
    Posted May 29th, 2017 at 04:38 PM by ghostexorcist ghostexorcist is offline
  8. Old Comment
    Pedro's Avatar

    Frankenstein Book Review

    You are welcome. But I must say your presentation was more scholarly than mine. I was mostly being tongue in cheek. Here´s an idea... why not cut and paste it to the thread. It would be a welcome addition.
    Posted May 29th, 2017 at 03:21 PM by Pedro Pedro is offline
  9. Old Comment
    ghostexorcist's Avatar

    Frankenstein Book Review

    Thank you for the kind remarks. Your review is much more in-depth than mine. Amazing job.
    Posted May 28th, 2017 at 08:12 PM by ghostexorcist ghostexorcist is offline
  10. Old Comment
    Pedro's Avatar

    Frankenstein Book Review

    An excellent overview. I find your points dead on, yet those discrepancies are what make the story fun. At least for an open discussion. Frankenstein was one of the Historum book reviews we did back in the day. You might find it good for a chuckle. Check it out.
    http://historum.com/historum-book-di...nkenstein.html
    Posted May 28th, 2017 at 05:19 PM by Pedro Pedro is offline
  11. Old Comment
    Lord Oda Nobunaga's Avatar

    Sources on the Ottoman and Safavid Wars

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by samshit View Comment
    Very good blog. Nice to read. There is one more interesting book concerning Ottoman and Safavid Wars: Kenneth Chase
    Firearms: A Global History to 1700. It describes unique features of wars between these countries.
    I did actually use that source. But I did not find it entirely relevant to the Ottoman-Safavid Wars so I chose to omit it.
    Posted May 24th, 2017 at 01:43 PM by Lord Oda Nobunaga Lord Oda Nobunaga is online now
  12. Old Comment

    Sources on the Ottoman and Safavid Wars

    Very good blog. Nice to read. There is one more interesting book concerning Ottoman and Safavid Wars: Kenneth Chase
    Firearms: A Global History to 1700. It describes unique features of wars between these countries.
    Posted May 16th, 2017 at 06:25 AM by samshit samshit is online now
  13. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    The Voice

    Skyfall

    I suppose the candidates I rehearsing with the band before the blinds. I sometimes dream that I could be present, to see how the candidate works with the band, how the band adapts itself, the orchestration, the style … because those background bands are absolutely fantastic. The level they are accompanying absolutely everything, it's … well, no way to say how professional they are.

    I crossed the Bosphorus, for listening the "Skyfall".

    And I think I start to like more the Greek metallic Skyfall than the original …





    ...
    Posted May 10th, 2017 at 12:10 PM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated May 10th, 2017 at 12:15 PM by deaf tuner
  14. Old Comment
    AlpinLuke's Avatar

    The Siege of Malta

    It begins ...

    The first Turkish ships were sighted by the lookouts of S. Elmo and S. Angel on May 18, 1565, a Friday. The fleet veered south-east and began to land troops in the deep bay of Marsascirocco. At this point contrasts rose immediately between Mustafa and Piali. The first one wanted to occupy the north of the island, to take the weak Mdina cutting communications with Sicily, then he would have besieged Birgu and Senglea. S. Elmo was possible to be safely ignored. It was an intelligent and rational plan but Piali didn't agree; he argued that the first duty was to ensure a good anchorage for the fleet and the only safe haven was Marsamxett watched only by the small fort. The engineers had assured the Turks they would have been able to conquer the stronghold in a few days. At the end of the discussions Mustafa accepted the point of view of Piali, considering the close relationship of the family of the Admiral with the Sultan. It was therefore decided to attack first S. Elmo.

    The army, therefore, went up north, leaving on its left an undisturbed Mdina, and put his camp in Marsa where the water met the land of the Grand Harbour. After having occupied the highest points of the Sciberras and having built the parapets, the Turkish sappers and artillerymen immediately began to put the guns in battery. On the morning of May 24th Mustafa ordered to open fire on S. Elmo. The bombardment went on for six days while the Musketeers from advanced trenches killed anyone exposing on the walls of the fort. On May 29th, however, the defenders carried out a sortie, which came as a surprise for advanced Turkish lines and that allowed the besieged knights to conquer the height parts of the Sciberras. But here, waiting for them, there were the Janissaries. With their high white caps [Bork] adorned with feathers of the heron , the "favorite sons of the Sultan" advanced Orta [regiment] after orta and, in a 'fierce struggle”, forced the men of St. Elmo to return to the fort. The intense bombardment went on for days, but every night La Valette sent reinforcements and ammunitions from Birgu and retired wounded and dying in the hospital to recover them in the village.

    Saturday, June 2nd Dragut arrived with his men. Dragut Rais, or Torghoud in turkish, was eighty years old and was the most famous and respected Muslim corsair. Among his achievements there had been an attack to Naples with the looting of Castellammare and the conquest of Reggio Calabria, where he had carried off into slavery the entire population. Dragut of Tripoli was carrying 1,500 pikemen and 15 ships with siege guns and ammunitions. The old pirate was quickly aware of the strategic error made by the Turkish Army, but unable to do anything, he simply organized new batteries and he fixed the existing ones more efficiently.
    Posted May 5th, 2017 at 06:38 AM by AlpinLuke AlpinLuke is offline
  15. Old Comment
    AlpinLuke's Avatar

    The Siege of Malta

    Part II – the Knights


    The Order of Malta had gathered on the Isles the following forces:

    541 Knights of the Order as follows:
    Language of Provence: 61 15 Knights and Sergeants;
    Language of Auvergne: 25 Knights and 14 Sergeants;
    Language in France: 57 24 Knights and Sergeants;
    Language of Italy: 164 5 Knights and Sergeants;
    Language of England: 1 Knight;
    Language of Germany: 13 Knights and 1 Sergeant;
    Language of Castile: 68 Knights and 6 Sergeants;
    Language of Aragon: 85 Knights and 1 Sergeant.

    Balbi in his diary makes also a list of the other forces available [not Knights]

    400 Spaniards under the command of Andres de Miranda and Juan de la Cerda, sent by the Viceroy of Sicily;
    200 Italians under the command of Hasdrubal de 'Medici;
    400 Italians under the command of Provencal Massuez Pierre de Vercoyran, said: "Colonel Mas" which was also sent by the Viceroy of Sicily;
    200 Italians under La Motte;
    100 soldiers of the garrison of St. Elmo;
    500 soldiers of the galleys;
    100 attendants of the Grand Master of the Knights;
    200 Greeks and Sicilians resident in Malta;
    500 slaves on galleys and paddlers in the contract (all volunteers);
    3,000 Maltese from all over the island.

    La Valette had been informed of the intentions of the Turks since the fall of 1564 and from that moment he began to storm Europe with requests for help and to take all measures necessary to sustain a long siege. Among the others he had arranged to realize a bridge of boats that connected Birgu Senglea through the arm of the sea [today Dockyard Creek].

    In command of Fort St. Elmo La Valette placed Luigi Broglia, from Piedmont, a Knight over seventy assisted by Giangiacomo Parpalla and as deputy commander the Spanish knight Juan de Guaras. He also reinforced the garrison with 200 foot soldiers under Juan de La Cerda and on several occasions during the siege, with the Italians of Colonel Mas, the knight was guarded by the brothers led by Geronimo Festival.

    As for Mdina La Valette sent there almost all the cavalry of the Order, knowing how important it was to maintain communications with the north island, with Gozo and, through it, with Sicily. The command of the fortress was given to Pedro Mezquita, a Portuguese. S. Michele, as mentioned, the place was garrisoned by the Knights of Italy, including Asdrubal de 'Medici and Anthony Hammer, assisted by the Maltese troops.

    Governor of St. Angelo was Galceran Ros, a Catalan knight, while Juan de Acuña was in command of a reserve consisting of 50 men. Each language was given a part of the walls of Birgu and Senglea. The most sought after, as we shall see, will be the places of Castile, Provence, Aragon and Auvergne.

    The strategic plan was simple: to resist until the arrival of renforcements from the continent or to hope that the Turks, because of the inhospitality of the island in the cold season and the approach of autumn and winter season for navigation, decide to retire. If the Knights had lost Malta there would have been no more place to go. The surrender was not an option.
    Posted May 4th, 2017 at 05:51 AM by AlpinLuke AlpinLuke is offline
  16. Old Comment
    AlpinLuke's Avatar

    Thought about the Exodus

    Jews in Egypt

    Discussing the matter of the Jewish Exodus in the forum, something has come to my mind:

    evidences that Jews settled in KmT are present, but they aren't so ancient: on the isle of Elephantine there was a Jewish Temple [a Temple, note this], from where they wrote letters to other Jewish communities. It was V century BCE.

    And in V century BCE the Jewish identity, with the tradition, was already in a certain measure well-defined [as I’ve mentioned in other occasions, in the letters from Elephantine there are aspects of the tradition, like the commemoration of the Passover].

    [A link to the Passover Letter: Passover Letter]

    Regarding when that temple had built, and when the Jews settled on that isle, there are different opinions. It seems it happened around the Babylonian conquest of Jerusalem [596 - 587BCE].

    An interesting reading about that community is
    The Jewish Temple at Elephantine
    Author(s): Stephen G. Rosenberg


    as presented on
    Near Eastern Archaeology,
    Vol. 67, No. 1 (Mar., 2004), pp. 4-13


    [PDF available: http://arthistory.wisc.edu/ah505/art...lephantine.pdf]

    Actually the tradition could start while the “Jews” are leaving KmT [Moses, according to the tradition, coded the tradition itself]. Anyway, reading the Bible, the impression is that this tradition existed [in other words, Moses and Aaron brought Israel back to the tradition and to the God of Abraham].

    So, according to the tradition, we should look for something “Jewish” in KmT in that far past. It's anyway clear that the tradition could not be accurate.
    Posted May 4th, 2017 at 05:23 AM by AlpinLuke AlpinLuke is offline
  17. Old Comment
    Lord Oda Nobunaga's Avatar

    Chinese Society in the Late Imperial Period: the Great Qing

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ajax_Minoan View Comment
    Cool man, I liked the article.
    This blog answered a lot of my questions about how people write articles on Historum. I love the multiple images.

    I wish I new more on Chinese history. It's not my strongest area, so it was hard to put everything into a broader context.
    Thanks, though I'm not finished yet.
    I still have not updated it which would add how Kangxi won over the populace as well as the events surrounding his death and succession. Though I probably have limited space to do so.
    Posted April 30th, 2017 at 10:40 PM by Lord Oda Nobunaga Lord Oda Nobunaga is online now
  18. Old Comment
    AlpinLuke's Avatar

    Nefertiti

    Update: the hypothesis that she didn't die or disappear.

    As I had occasion to discuss in a long thread[http://historum.com/ancient-history/...hive-001k.html], some objects found by Carter in Tut's tomb seem to suggest that the Queen didn't disappear, but that she became a Pharaoh [female and then male].

    The box object of the discussion presents an inscription showing Akhenaten, Meritaten and in the middle the names of an unknown monarch: Ankhkheperure Neferneferuaten.

    Now, the particularity is that both prenomen and nomen of this Queen [it's a female personage] are composed with "mary" [beloved of, loved by] and two names. These two names are prenomen and nomen of Akhenaten.

    This pictures makes the matter a bit more clear:
    Click the image to open in full size.

    Note: Neferkheperre Waenre is the throne name of Akhenaten.

    Explanation: to recognize the names of a Pharaoh we have to pay attention to the captions before of the cartouches.

    Click the image to open in full size.

    The interesting aspect is that the real name of Nefertiti was

    Neferneferuaten Nefertiti.

    Now, who was a female personage in the Royal Court beloved of Akhenaten?

    The most obvious answer [since an other Neferneferuaten is not known] is ... Nefertiti.

    An other clue that there was a female monarch is the presence, in Tut's burial site, of statuettes depicting kings looking like Queens ...
    Click the image to open in full size.
    Posted April 26th, 2017 at 12:48 AM by AlpinLuke AlpinLuke is offline
  19. Old Comment
    Ajax_Minoan's Avatar

    Primary Source: Ammianus Marcellinus on the Huns

    This was helpful to me for something I am researching. I'm going to have to read the account of this historian on the Huns myself. I want to read Jordanes Origins and Deeds of the Goths as well.
    Posted April 23rd, 2017 at 03:24 PM by Ajax_Minoan Ajax_Minoan is offline
  20. Old Comment
    Ajax_Minoan's Avatar

    Chinese Society in the Late Imperial Period: the Great Qing

    Cool man, I liked the article.
    This blog answered a lot of my questions about how people write articles on Historum. I love the multiple images.

    I wish I new more on Chinese history. It's not my strongest area, so it was hard to put everything into a broader context.
    Posted April 23rd, 2017 at 01:01 AM by Ajax_Minoan Ajax_Minoan is offline
Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.