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I always liked jokes.
I like them not only cause they're funny, but good jokes use to have a way of their own to say more that they should.
Not sure that the joke i like are good. Nor that You will like them.
But hey, as I can have my blog, I will post them.
You can just ignore it
Or You can ask the mods to shut the blog, too

p.s. hope You will not mind if I will post some of my thoughts and impressions beside the jokes
Rating: 2 votes, 3.00 average.

Broken mirror

Posted October 17th, 2015 at 11:50 AM by deaf tuner
Updated April 15th, 2017 at 01:49 PM by deaf tuner
Tags refugees, syria

Very long ago I saw a suggestive scene on a broken mirror. I don't remember the movie, I remember it was on WW2, it was black and white and there were some very strong scenes. Maybe it was a movie made in SU. The few sequences I remember are the kind some Sovietic directors were masters in creating.

Trying to get a look at reality, to make an image of it, to see and understand is always only partial achieved, like looking into a mirror: it might be accurate, but remains a part, not the whole. And remains a reflection of, not the reality.

The symbol of the broken window, in the context of a conflict remained with me ever since. All those small pieces, each one reflecting its own small reality ... tiny fragments, that suggests the whole, but never able to reflect it .... how much all change when You move just a bit ... how different, how other is the image if You make just one step to left or right ...

* * * * *

One of things struck me (and it will continue striking me, I suppose) is how we see only one mirror. An English one, as the web is in English.

So, as in my wandering through the other Web, the one we largely ignore, I gathered some shards, I thought I would put them here. Only the shards, no comments, no photos.

I don't know if it's of any use.
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Total Comments 14

Comments

  1. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    ... giving a humanitarian visa

    " ... Giving a humanitarian visa for a person, it's good. But for a country it's not good.

    Imagine, if You give a visa to all Italian and they all leave Italy for Russia, what will Italy become ?

    For one person, at personal level, it's good. If I get a visa for Germany, I go there, I have my rights; but for a country, 22 million leaving it? The people will be saved but we have lost the country !

    Do You get me ?

    It's al right, on humanitarian level. But with what result ? What will happen in 10 years ? They will bring Chinese to repopulate Syria ?

    Now it's difficult for me, as my wife leaved for Europe. My family is going to stay in Syria. It is why I didn't departured as refugee. A refugee status would stop me to go to Syria 5, 10 years. If there is a problem in my family, from Lebanon I can go clandestinely and help them.

    (Syrian refugee, Lebanon, summer 2015)

    ___
    RTBF - La Première, soyez curieux - Podcast
    Posted October 18th, 2015 at 06:50 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated March 27th, 2017 at 11:58 AM by deaf tuner
  2. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    ...we had a good life

    " ... Before, we had a good life. All the Syrians Muslims, Alawits, Armenians, Christians, we had a good life, all together. We just need peace.

    We loose our young ones. They leave because of war. When comes the time for their military service, it's devastating for them. So the families are sending them to Lebanon or Europe to save the life of their sons.
    ...
    The Syrians are leaving because of bombings, because of fear, fear of death. So, those still living in Alep or Homs, they simply have not enough money to leave their city, their country.

    What I would like You to understand is that we do not want to leave. We would like our youngsters to come back, that those still here don't go away. because young are the the vitality of a country, every country's, not only Syria.
    ...
    We don't want to go. We want the great powers to help us negotiate the end of this war and help us reconstruct our country.

    ___
    source: RTBF - La Première, soyez curieux - Podcast
    Posted October 18th, 2015 at 11:19 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated December 5th, 2015 at 09:27 AM by deaf tuner
  3. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    ... Jabar, you gotta go!

    " ... My mother was pregnant and refused to marry my uncle, as tradition dictates. So we fled to Iran.
    ...
    When I was 15, my mother said «Jabar, you gotta go! We do not know what can happen!» She sold everything we owned, jewellery, refrigerator, to pay the $ 6,000 for the smuggler. I had never left my mother. «I do not want to leave!» I shouted, crying.
    ...
    The smuggler took us by bus to Turkey. In Istanbul, I was locked up with the others for two weeks in a basement with only a small piece of bread each morning. There were no sanitary. I was with two teens, we were afraid; today I still I feel that fear. When I remember this, I can not control myself, I cry.
    ...
    With other young people, we looked into garbage cans to survive, we became crazy because of hunger! A country fellow who took pity on me paid me the ticket to Chiasso. At the registration station, I could finally take a shower: I was so filthy!
    ...
    Seven months after my arrival, I was finally able to speak to my mother. We cried on the phone for twenty minutes.

    ___
    source: Réfugié, mineur et seul au monde | L'illustré
    Posted October 18th, 2015 at 12:30 PM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated December 5th, 2015 at 09:27 AM by deaf tuner
  4. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    ... they taught us

    " ... They taught us to kill and to blow ourselves. We must put our hand on the forehead, pull the head, put the knife on his throat and slice. And for the belt that is attached to our body, we are told that we must pull up a white piece of metal attached to it and we blow immediately. It has also taught us to pull the ring on top of a grenade and throw it immediately, or else it will blow us '

    (Rhagib al-Yas Ahmed, 14 years old. )

    ___
    source: Etat islamique*: des enfants entraînés pour tuer à Racca | euronews, monde
    Posted October 19th, 2015 at 11:16 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated December 5th, 2015 at 09:27 AM by deaf tuner
  5. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    ... we were more than 80

    " ... We were more than 80 Yezidi children to camp beside the Muslim children. There were from 5, 6 years to 15 years. My 15 years old cousin is still there.

    They trained us from early in the morning till night at the "Farouq Institute for children" and our pictures and videos were posted on a Facebook page. We were taught religion and those who could not learn were punished.

    The punishment was to be beaten or stand in the sun. They would get us up at 4am to pray and they watched us and punished those who did not woke. There was little food, we had one meal a day.

    (Hamada Shihab Ahmed, 10 years old)

    ____
    source: Etat islamique*: des enfants entraînés pour tuer à Racca | euronews, monde
    Posted October 19th, 2015 at 11:22 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated December 5th, 2015 at 09:27 AM by deaf tuner
  6. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    ... Turkey is now the window to the world

    " ... When the events took place, many towns and cities were evacuated. What usually happens is that when you have the regime intending to enter a place, they besiege the place and they cut water, electricity and all the resources. People really cannot survive there so they either have to leave or live under fire with no resources at all. That’s what happened in most of the northern cities. They stayed there, but when the danger approaches they could not really risk it. Most of them would have families and they did want to put them in danger so they flew. Furthermore, there are many people who use Turkey as a station. For instance, they go to Turkey to see friends and families because it is not possible to see them in Syria. So there are people visiting, coming and going either from Syria or from other parts of the world. Turkey is like a hub now where people come and meet. For instance, I want to see my mom, but it is very difficult to go back home since it is dangerous. I might not be able to come back here again, so the solution is to meet up in Turkey. That’s what most of people are doing. Thus, they use Turkey as a one step from home and they try to reach other destinations. Turkey is now the window to the world.

    (Reem Doukmak)

    ___
    source: Interview with Reem Doukmak: Syrian Refugees in Turkey ? Research Turkey[/SIZE]
    Posted October 19th, 2015 at 11:59 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated December 5th, 2015 at 09:29 AM by deaf tuner
  7. Old Comment
    antonina's Avatar
    Thank you for translating these accounts for us Deaf Tuner.

    _____________

    (I am the one to thank You for passing by and reading it, antonina ! dt)
    Posted October 29th, 2015 at 05:45 AM by antonina antonina is offline
    Updated January 25th, 2016 at 01:28 PM by deaf tuner
  8. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    ... never there

    A journalist said that on the Turkish beaches serving as departure points to Greek islands, there is a joke that can be heard over and over :

    "Hey, Moses!

    Moses !!

    ... darn, that guy is never here when You need him !"
    Posted October 31st, 2015 at 01:20 PM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated December 5th, 2015 at 09:30 AM by deaf tuner
  9. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    ... I become anxious

    " ... It's especially in the evening, when I come home that I am scared. There is plenty of them. When I see some 30 men in front of me in the street, I become anxious.

    I've heard on TV that those people might be sick. I also red it on the web. I don't remember exactly what kind of illness.

    But the local authorities sent us all letters to let us know that this people could be transmitting diseases and how we could be affected.

    Hungary is for Hungarians. We have enough foreigners already. We don't need more.

    Nicolette Szabo - 22 years old - South Hungary

    ________
    source: RTBF - La Première, soyez curieux - Podcast
    Posted November 4th, 2015 at 01:38 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated December 27th, 2015 at 11:19 PM by deaf tuner
  10. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    Mariana

    Mariana, was assaulted during her crossing as an undocumented person through Mexico with the intent to arrive in the US. The assailants pushed her into a ravine and attempted to rape her. Her travel companion was beaten when he tried to defend her. Mariana was moved to a hospital in Tenosique, Tabasco, and then to three others that did not perform the operation she needed. Fifteen days passed until the operation became urgent. The last doctor that saw her only requested a new splint and a call to immigration.

    ________
    source: Atchuup! - Cool Stories Daily
    Posted December 26th, 2015 at 02:10 PM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated December 27th, 2015 at 11:18 PM by deaf tuner
  11. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    "Helwayat al Châm" - "Sweetnesses of Damascus"

    "It is me who created the logo of the store and the packagings!

    I always fought to study what I wanted, I was fascinated and nothing could divert me from the art and art-crafts.

    It is not the bombs that I fled, but the possibility of becoming the one who launches the bombs.

    In 1948 the Palestinians thought returning home in a couple of days, look where they are there today.

    We don't have a country any longer."

    Rafic 27 years old - Istanbul
    _________
    source: Petits boulots à Istanbul pour de jeunes Syriens qui rêvaient en grand à Damas
    Posted July 4th, 2016 at 10:31 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
  12. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    Here I feel useful

    " I am aware I am luckier than many of my fellow countrymen who live under tents or beg in the street, but it does not necessarily mean that I am happy here.

    Here I feel useful for my fellow countrymen. As our country can't offer us anything any more, it is necessary to adapt itself to the Turks who welcome us and to learn their language.

    Our students are mainly young Syrians of 20 and 30 years, they are very motivated and within six months they manage to manage correctly in Turk "

    Nour, 26 years, receptionist at a languages institute established by a Syrian, Istanbul
    ______________
    source: Petits boulots à Istanbul pour de jeunes Syriens qui rêvaient en grand à Damas
    Posted July 4th, 2016 at 10:52 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
  13. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    Grandfather spoke about the village

    "Grandfather spoke about the village, about the life at the farm, about the fields, the orchards, the mountains.

    At a moment, in the story, I felt an embarrassment. There were silences. Young, we noticed the silences. Suddenly, the story jumped. We found Grandfather at 16, alone in the streets of Baghdad or in the tent camp in Aleppo, then in the boat for Marseille. He told how he had learnt carpentry. What had happened meanwhile?

    I guessed that there had been something important, too gruesome to say. The genocide, the grandfather told it to me silently."

    Christian Varoujan Artin, France
    _________
    source: Arméniens, la nostalgie pour patrie
    Posted July 4th, 2016 at 11:20 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated July 4th, 2016 at 11:40 AM by deaf tuner
  14. Old Comment
    deaf tuner's Avatar

    Ayham al-Ahmad Ahmad

    “Six months after the partial blockade of Yarmouk, the camp became airtight. Flour and bread were banned, everything was banned from coming into the camp. We used to say that they would have even stopped airflow had they found a way to do it. At that time, I started to feel the plight I inflicted upon my kids. Why did I stay? What would I do?”

    He tried to take his piano with him. But

    “there was a member of Islamic State at the checkpoint who stopped me and asked: ‘Don’t you know that the musical instruments are haram [forbidden]’?” Then they burnt my piano ... ”

    ___________________
    Syrian musicians among growing number of refugees in Europe
    El Pianista de Yarmouk
    Posted March 27th, 2017 at 11:58 AM by deaf tuner deaf tuner is offline
    Updated March 28th, 2017 at 11:24 AM by deaf tuner
 

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