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It has been shown that in the religions of Egypt and Babylon, various gods are called the son and image of the supreme god. In
addition Hellenistic cults could make Hellen-istic rulers the visible manifestation of a god,
with the concept of soteriology linked with the concept of icons.
(Kleinknecht in Theological Dictionary
of the New Testament v.2,p.390n50)

And we know of course that the first
Christians portrayed Christ as the Son and
image of God (2 Cor 4:4)Col 1:15)Heb 1:3), while contemporary pagans worshipped
the "beast"(Rev 13:14-15),i.e. Caesar, whose chief cultic center (Pergamum) was
known to the Christians as "Satan's throne"
(Rev 2:13).
The influx of religious influence from Egypt in this period has been revealed by
archaeological discoveries in the chief centers of Asia Minor (Turkey), as noted by
Helmut Koester ("Paul And His World" 2007
[p.159]).
In their "Hellenistic Commentary On The
New Testament"(1995),Eugene Boring, Klaus
Berger, and Carsten Colpe suggest (p.27-8)
that "Son of God" statements in the New
Testament "originated with reference to
Egyptian religiosity", possibly with Hellenistic
Judaism having a mediating role.
Such influences must have facilitated the
growth of Christianity in the region because
it's system so closely resembled existing
beliefs, giving the Greco-Roman masses an
alternative to the worship of the DIVI FILIUS
(Divine Son), Caesar, and an opportunity to
place their hopes in the God of Israel through His image and Son, both of whom
enjoyed strong reputations as defenders of
the weak, and champions of the underdog.
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Christian Success: The Influence Of Egypt

Posted February 2nd, 2017 at 08:47 AM by Tod Stites

It has been shown that in the religions of
Egypt and Babylon, various gods are called the son and image of the supreme god. And
Hellenistic cults could make Hellenistic rulers
the visible manifestation of a god, with the
concept of soteriology linked with the concept of icons.

Kleinknecht in Theological Dictionary Of The
New Testament vol.2,p.390n50

We know of course that the first
Christians portrayed Christ as the Son and
image of God (2 Cor 4:4)-(Col 1:15)-(Heb
1:3), while contemporary Greco-Romans
were seen as worshipping "the beast"(Rev
13:13-15), i.e. Caesar, whose chief cultic
center (Pergamum), was known to the
Christians as "Satan's throne"(Rev 2:13).
The influx of religious influence from
Egypt into the eastern Mediterranean region in this period has been confirmed by recent
archaeological centers of Asia Minor (Turkey)
as noted by Helmut Koester ("Paul And His
World" p.159) in 2007.
In their "Hellenistic Commentary On The
New Testament", Boring,Berger and Colpe
have (1995) suggested (p.27-8) that "Son of
God" statements in the New Testament"
"originated with reference to Egyptian religiosity", possibly with Egyptian Hellenistic
Judaism having a mediating role.
Such influences presumably facilitated
the growth of Christianity in the region due
to the latter's resemblance to the former,
giving the poor Greco-Roman urban
populations of the period an alternative to
the worship of the DIVI FILIUS, the "Divine
Son", Caesar, and an opportunity to place
their hopes in the God of Israel through his
image and Son, both of whom enjoyed a
strong reputation as defenders of the weak
and champions of the underdog,
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