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Battle of Brawner's Farm- Stonewall meets the Iron Brigade

Posted April 5th, 2013 at 08:54 AM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)
Updated April 8th, 2013 at 05:34 PM by Viperlord

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The opening clash in the Second Battle of Manassas erupted on August 28th. The ailing Rufus King's division of Federal troops was marching along the Warrenton Turnpike, bound for Centreville, where Union Maj. Gen. John Pope, commanding officer of the Army of Virginia, believed Stonewall Jackson's men to be located. In fact, Jackson and his veteran divisions...
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The Myth of the Free Hand

Posted March 31st, 2013 at 02:50 PM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)
Updated April 1st, 2013 at 05:05 AM by Viperlord

The relationship between Ulysses S. Grant and Abraham Lincoln is often summed up by the apocryphal story of Lincoln saying "I can't spare this man; he fights" after the battle of Shiloh. But while Henry Halleck sidelined Grant after Shiloh, probably for his own ambition, Halleck also shielded Grant from a presidential inquiry into his actions. The truth is, to some extent, Abraham Lincoln did believe he could spare Grant, and considered doing so on several occasions, starting with Shiloh....
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Ulysses S. Grant: The Butcher? Part II

Posted March 20th, 2013 at 02:48 PM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)
Updated March 21st, 2013 at 02:43 PM by Viperlord

Because of the timidity of the front-line commander at Petersburg, Baldy Smith, the war did not end right then and there in 1864. But nevertheless, Grant placed Lee in a siege that the Rebel general could never win, which Lee himself dreaded above all else, and effectively neutralized him as a serious offensive threat.
The Overland Campaign cost about 55,000 Union casualties, and 33-34,000 for the Confederates under Lee. The casualty numbers were grim, certainly, and raised some disquiet
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Ulysses S. Grant: The Butcher? Part I

Posted March 20th, 2013 at 02:20 PM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)
Updated March 21st, 2013 at 03:02 PM by Viperlord

It's a common perception that U.S. Grant was a clumsy commander who won his battles merely through application of overwhelming force, taking disproportionate amounts of losses in the process. Mary Todd Lincoln (A questionable source on anything to do with reality) called Grant a butcher. The idea was perpetuated by the "Lost Cause" school of thought originating with ex-Confederates after the Civil War. It's a common perception among many people, whether they believe Grant was a butcher...
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John Gibbon, Loyal and Able Soldier

Posted March 20th, 2013 at 06:14 AM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)
Updated April 17th, 2013 at 07:20 PM by Viperlord

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John Gibbon was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in April 1827. When he was ten years old, his family moved to Charlotte, North Carolina. He graduated from West Point in 1847, and was commissioned as a brevet second lieutenant in the 3rd US Artillery.
After the Mexican War, Gibbon served in southern Florida, and later taught artillery tactics at West Point. During his time at West Point, he wrote The Artillerist's Manual,...
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