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John Gibbon and Strategy

Posted November 5th, 2016 at 08:57 PM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)

John Gibbon, a North Carolinian West Pointer who remained loyal to the Union and very ably led troops throughout the war, is one of my favorite figures of the American Civil War. He is not someone I ever talk about in relation to strategy, because he spent most of the war as a division commander, briefly attaining corps command at the end, and early on of course, forging and leading the famed Iron Brigade. Consequently, I was pleased to come across a campaign plan proposed by none other than John...
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Still Learning

Posted October 20th, 2016 at 05:58 PM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)

Partly out of idle curiosity, partly because it might inform my next major post on Ulysses S. Grant when that happens, I was going through the Official Records. Particularly, I was going through correspondence in early 1864, curious to see some of the process of Grant planning and evolving his 1864 strategy. In my recent post on Grant of course, I consequently talked about Grant's three pronged-attack in Virginia, featuring George Meade, Benjamin Butler, and Franz Sigel as the principal commanders,...
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If It Takes All Summer: The Strategy of Ulysses S. Grant in 1864

Posted September 21st, 2016 at 06:26 AM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)
Updated September 21st, 2016 at 07:58 AM by Viperlord

As 1864 dawned, the Civil War seemed to still very much hang in the balance. Despite Ulysses S. Grant's decisive victory at Chattanooga, a Confederate army still guarded Northern Georgia, Kirby Smith's virtually independent Confederate department of the Trans-Mississippi still stood, and most importantly of all, Virginia, the heart of the Confederacy, still held firm against the Union's Army of the Potomac. Virginia had proved to be a vexing problem for Union generals, planners,...
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Battle for Culp's Hill- July 2, 1863

Posted May 6th, 2013 at 11:59 AM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)

Much attention has been paid to what occurred on the extreme left flank of the Union army on July 2; the dramatic battle for Little Round Top. Comparatively little public attention goes to Culp's Hill, which represented the extreme right of the Union line. This hill was actually far more important to the integrity of the Union position. Culp's Hill represented the hook of the famous "fishhook." A Confederate force holding it would have potentially rendered the Union line untenable; the...
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Forgotten Hero of the Trans-Mississippi: Samuel R. Curtis

Posted April 18th, 2013 at 06:53 AM by Viperlord (Viperlord's History Blog)
Updated April 21st, 2013 at 08:22 AM by Viperlord

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As Salah rightly noted in his thread on Darius Couch, there are overrated and underrated generals in the American Civil War. The most criminally underrated of them all, in my view, is Samuel Ryan Curtis, victor of Pea Ridge and Westport. Curtis was born in 1805, and graduated from West Point in 1831. He soon resigned from the army to work as a civil engineer, and was also admitted to the bar. He served...
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