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Old December 31st, 2017, 04:46 AM   #41

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Yes, I think about learning Latin, Greek, Arabic, Biblical Hebrew, Anglo-Saxon, Church Slavonic, Ottoman-Turkish. I think my life is enough to learn them because they're much important and I like them all
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Old December 31st, 2017, 08:31 AM   #42

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Beside which, language skills tend to be well paid and the jobs are plentiful. Language, history and cultural studies in SE Europe and Western Asia are at a premium these days.
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Old December 31st, 2017, 09:06 AM   #43

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Beside which, language skills tend to be well paid and the jobs are plentiful. Language, history and cultural studies in SE Europe and Western Asia are at a premium these days.
Yes, I was just thinking to Turkey. A Russian medievalist knowing Greek and Latin ... Turkey. What else? Syria is a bit dangerous nowadays ...

P.S. a possible alternative would be Israel as a bridge for Western Europe or United States [not a few Italian medievalist have worked on the field in Israel with all those sites coming from the age of the Crusaders]. But it depends on which part of Middle Age will interest you most. If the age of the Crusaders ... think to Israel and actually also to Lebanon or Jordan.

Last edited by AlpinLuke; December 31st, 2017 at 09:11 AM.
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Old January 2nd, 2018, 11:53 AM   #44

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Read and master that list, and you are entitled to call yourself a Medievalist. Great list of excellent books that should keep a serious student busy for a decade or so.
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Reading a lot of books does not make one a medievalist, a good command of medieval languages, the historical method and the auxillaries of medieval history (especially paleography) does this for those willing to venture into this field.
Nicely put Entreri, let us also not forget that a Historian, even those specialized in the Medieval period, is not a reader, but is a writer, a producer of historical content. The idea is not only to research, but to publish his findings and his conclusions. Reading all the books that exist in the world (if that was possible) about the Medieval period doesn’t make Medievalist.

Anyway, there are some good and fundamental books in that list by the Nickname, others seem more specific of the English speaking countries.
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Old January 6th, 2018, 06:01 AM   #45

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Hail to all! What advices can you give me about becoming a Medievallist (academic)? What is necessary to become a Medievallist, what do I need to know mostly?
Start with reading. A lot. And don't read just to master the content, while you will need that, in order to conduct serious research you need to be able to inquire about why an author is asking the questions that they are asking and how they are framing their answers. Get a history degree. This will allow you to get a sense of what sort of medieval studies you want to engage with, ie: do you like working with documents? Coins? Objects? Literature? Theology? There are many, many paths into medieval studies: take a look at the presentation lists from past conferences of medieval studies at Kalamazoo, MI, USA, where I'd say the bulk of those studying the middle ages come from a wide spectrum of the humanities and not just history departments. While doing your degree, be sure to take a few classes in other fields and other aspects of history, as this is important for keeping the questions you are asking of your sources into perspective.

For now, read what interests you. For later, you will need to focus more. "Middle ages" can cover just about anything from late antiquity in the British Isles to the Ottoman period in Iraq, so there's a huge range of places, languages, and literatures to deal with. My general suggestion would be to focus in on one "major" medieval language (Latin, Greek, Arabic) during your studies and get a taste for the others. The reason for this is that some of them (namely, Greek and Arabic) can be quite difficult and will take several years to achieve functional reading comprehension of edited texts, not to speak of the issues that come up when you have to deal with material in manuscript. The second reason is that major langauges open up a lot of source material but also help you in branching off into others. For example, if your Arabic is good then jumping into Syriac will not be so bad, and Greek will give you a (minor) leg up towards Armenian. For any of this, you will also need the major European languages. German and French are critical, you know English, and Latin and French will allow you to make some headway into Italian without a huge investment of time.
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Old January 6th, 2018, 10:52 AM   #46

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Kirialax, thank you for answer! Am I to understand that I need to learn also something like Anthropology, religious studies, Bible? And am I to understand that I I shouldn't learn too many medieval languages?
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Old January 8th, 2018, 03:36 AM   #47

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Kirialax, thank you for answer! Am I to understand that I need to learn also something like Anthropology, religious studies, Bible? And am I to understand that I I shouldn't learn too many medieval languages?
I'm not sure that you need to "learn" an entire new discipline, but it's worth giving it a try. At least in Canada, most undergrad BA degrees will require you to take about 40 courses, so there's definitely room for other things. Part of doing a doctorate is doing something original, and seeing how people in other fields are doing things can help.

As for languages, some of these that you have mentioned (Greek, Arabic, Ottoman) are big and complicated and difficult languages that do not always have the best support materials available. So for Greek, for example, there's little instruction available in medieval Greek, and in English at least there is no good medieval Greek dictionary or grammar. So you start with either ancient or modern Greek and work on your own from there. There's no way around Latin, though - even if you don't work with Latin sources many critical editions have parts in Latin and sometimes all you'll be able to find from some odd old eastern source is a Latin translation for 300 years ago. I would suggest sampling the languages to see what interests you and what you're good at. The people who actually learn all these languages are philologists and they don't tend to have a whole lot of time for historical research since they're busy with linguistic matters.
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Old January 8th, 2018, 06:42 AM   #48
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Lately Ive been considering becoming a Medievalist as well, I have a few months left in the US Navy after which I plan on finishing my Bachelors Degree in History and Im considering focusing on the Medieval period for my masters...My ultimate goal and aspiration is to write and produce a podcast..

The advice given to ladislav is beneficial to me as well..

Are there any American Universities that a great for Medieval studies or is Europe the only way to go, Id love to go to Europe I just never considered it until now..
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Old January 8th, 2018, 09:11 AM   #49

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I know Central European University (Budapest) that offers both MA and PhD degree in Medieval studies, University of Leeds in Britain offers MA and PhD in Medieval studies. In USA it is Notre Same university (PhD only), Yale University
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Old January 8th, 2018, 09:46 AM   #50

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Lately Ive been considering becoming a Medievalist as well, I have a few months left in the US Navy after which I plan on finishing my Bachelors Degree in History and Im considering focusing on the Medieval period for my masters...My ultimate goal and aspiration is to write and produce a podcast..

The advice given to ladislav is beneficial to me as well..

Are there any American Universities that a great for Medieval studies or is Europe the only way to go, Id love to go to Europe I just never considered it until now..
Plenty of medieval studies stuff going on in the US as well. Just keep in mind that a university does not need a medieval studies department for you to do medieval studies - most medieval historians in the Anglophone world have their doctorates from history departments. At least in America, medieval studies is often very literary, so if your interests are more in history, all the more reason to look at history departments.

Do not pay for a graduate degree. Funding might be a little tight around the MA level, but do not go into debt for a graduate degree in the humanities. Keep your options open and remember that it's usually much, much cheaper in Europe or Canada. CEU in Budapest offers an excellent funded MA in medieval studies in English. Their applications for Sept. 2018 will probably be due in the next month or two. As Ladislav has noted, Notre Dame is strong. So is Toronto, but funding seems non-existent at the MA level. This would be something to ask a real medievalist. Since I deal with the east, I'm really not sure where the centres of power for the study of medieval Europe are located in the US.

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I know Central European University (Budapest) that offers both MA and PhD degree in Medieval studies, University of Leeds in Britain offers MA and PhD in Medieval studies. In USA it is Notre Same university (PhD only), Yale University
From personal experience I can speak highly of Central European University. Cambridge is more accessible in terms of funding and admission than one might think, although that's at the graduate level. Still, it's something to keep in mind.
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