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Old November 17th, 2013, 02:27 PM   #21

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History has always been an hobby of mine as well as a passion and I would like to keep it that way.
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Old November 17th, 2013, 05:26 PM   #22

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Quote:
Originally Posted by So long View Post
There are parts where historians have no squabbles, but in general, they can't converge at all, especially when it comes to some politically important episodes of history. Nobody will argue about Caesar right now, but many would argue about Charles de Gaulle for example, because his figure is still in demand. Let alone about the periods of the history when there were no proper records, the number of contradictive statements from historians about such periods can be enumerated endlessly.
That does not invalidate the field.
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Old November 22nd, 2013, 08:10 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Kirialax View Post



Never mind me. I'm just quoting this because it's fabulous.

Haha sarcasm or no? My spelling was god awful:/ but when I post on my phone, that happens and autocorrect kills me. *sigh*
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Old November 24th, 2013, 08:20 AM   #24

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Originally Posted by BlackBear View Post
Haha sarcasm or no? My spelling was god awful:/ but when I post on my phone, that happens and autocorrect kills me. *sigh*
No sarcasm. It was a good post.
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Old November 24th, 2013, 06:15 PM   #25
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Then thank you. It's how I view it. Unfortunately this world is more and more science based and less and less humanities based, to the detriment of society.
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Old December 16th, 2013, 03:25 AM   #26

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I have majors in both Ancient and Modern History. I teach primary school kids so I actually don't need either of them, but I would be a less well rounded person if I didn't have them.

Humanities rock!!
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Old March 23rd, 2014, 06:35 AM   #27
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Once upon a time you got a degree in an area that interests you and a job in that area too, a while back you got a degree in an area that interests you or one that got you a job. Now as no degree gets you jobs you may as well get one in an area that interests you, if you enjoy it there's nothing to regret.
Nowadays, if a young person doesn't go to college and has a rough time making a living wage, they are told they should have gone to college.

If they get a degree, but it isn't in a STEM field, and can't make a living wage, they are told they shouldn't have wasted their time on something useless.

If they get a STEM degree and can't make a living wage, they are told they are "entitled" for "assuming that a degree guarantees you employment."

Basically the boomers were able to pay for a house, two cars, a wife, three kids and a dog simply by waking up in the morning and walking into a factory after dropping out of grade 10. They pissed away much greater economic opportunities than the millennials will ever see, and now want the millennials to fund their next 20+ years of increasing senility while complaining about how "lazy" the same 20-something are with their master's degrees, four unpaid internships in a row and 1000 hours of volunteer experience, because they work at Starbucks and make minimum wage. It's bullshit. You can't win nowadays.

With that said, I strongly disagree about there being "nothing to regret" about pursuing post-secondary education that one enjoys. Tuition is not cheap. $30-60k in debt with no prospects and no job leaves plenty of time to sit around your parents' couch and think about regrets. Better to have simply spent four years working in a warehouse and reading Cassius Dio in your spare time.

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Anyways, I detest both the attitude of "oh don't major in that you won't find a job" as well as the conditions that caused it.

First of all, a humanities education, and particularly history if you ask me, make you smarter. Plain and simple. The discipline is fantastic or learning how to craft logical arguments, analyze data, think critically, look for bias, reading skills, etc. it also offers an unparalleled understanding of the world today. It is a fantastic discipline. Academia ought to be more important in society, imo.
Perhaps it "ought to be" more important in our society, but it simply isn't. I agree with you about detesting the conditions that caused the attitude, but the attitude is based on realities. People need to adapt to survive in this world. Devoting four years to studying humanities is a luxury, not a necessity. And I think that the argument that post-secondary education is innately valuable because it teaches you how to think, while true to an extent, does not give proper credit for the ability of people to learn independently.
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Old March 23rd, 2014, 07:28 AM   #28

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Never give up! Instead of bemoaning the difficulties you face, seek instead the countless opportunities that present themselves to a motivated seeker. Unable to afford college classes, I quietly joined classes for the knowledge alone. If you do that, keep your mouth shut, your ears open and don't take the tests lest ye be caught. The Internet and libraries are almost boundless assets to even the poorest student looking for an education. Ah you will say, but without a printed diploma what use is it? Knowledge and maybe wisdom is the goal of education ... not a degree that will make you wealthy and powerful. No degree without the skills and knowledge that comes from careful intense study is worth much anyway. OK, so today's market place is a harsh mistress. Once you become minimally competent, take the tests and your degree by enrolling for a year. The degree will get you an entry level job ... maybe ... but success requires more than a monthly salary with perks.

It takes time to become established in any career. Your competitive peers have to gain respect for you and your contributions before your services command high rewards. Getting on that first step of the ladder is difficult, and perhaps today the difficulties are a bit greater than they were 100 years ago. Don't despair, don't quit. As we age and gain experience in this age, our interests and expectations evolve. What is important to a twenty something, may have almost zero interest to a fifty year old. Youth is a time for challenges and adventures, so embrace them and build fine memories for your rocking chair years. Adventures are risks almost by definition, so expect setbacks, to lose, to get hurt, and to fail utterly. It's part of your education, and the tuition is worth it usually. This notion that one spends a 4 or 5 years in an institution and is rewarded more money and independence than someone who has labored in the field for decades is bosh.

Live each day, each hour as if it were your last. Work hard and focus intently on what is immediately at hand. Take risks, but calculate them. Have clear and achievable goals, but remain flexible enough to change course 180 degrees if necessary. Don't define success in terms of your bank account, but don't scorn the small profits of daily business. Happiness and despair are transient emotions, so don't expect either to be a permanent condition. Be kind, and forgive easily the forces that seem determined to make you fail. Success and failure are more in our own minds than in the larger scheme of things. Rich is better than poor, so be rich in every respect. Love beauty, justice, benevolence and the endless variety of experiences that the universe has bestowed on us.
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Old March 23rd, 2014, 08:18 AM   #29
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I don't regret studying political science as an undergrad; I do regret doing my graduate work in the same field.
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Old March 28th, 2014, 04:46 AM   #30

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In terms of the soft skills that employers want and the general academic abilities, history is as good a subject as many and better than some. There are no blakc and white answers so students have to argue their case based on available evidence. Whats not to like?

There is no guarantee of a job with pretty much any degree; but at least history has transferable skills.
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