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View Poll Results: Should I Teach History at High School or College?
College 27 56.25%
High School 7 14.58%
Either is good, really 8 16.67%
Heck if I know. 6 12.50%
Voters: 48. You may not vote on this poll

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Old May 26th, 2015, 02:16 PM   #11

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Originally Posted by HackneyedScribe View Post
Closest experience I had was a private tutor, not a teacher. But to me it seems like college students are more mature. High schoolers are less controllable, and spend more effort giving you a hard time rather than listening in class.
I would agree with you on this! LOL (with very few exceptions)
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Old May 26th, 2015, 02:26 PM   #12
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A professorship is usually the better job, with (generally speaking) better benefits and better pay and definitely far more research opportunities; if you do make it to a full professorship (or once you get away from teaching introductory courses) you'll also have the advantage of mostly teaching people who are interested and want to be in your class. But it takes more time in school, is harder to get, and you will probably have a lot less choice in where you work or live. Teaching high school will probably not pay as well, most kids won't want to be there, is definitely not as prestigious of a position and has zero opportunity for research, if you like that sort of thing, but it requires less schooling, is a much easier job to get, you will have more choice in where you work and live, and you can do things like coach sports if you're into that (that's the main reason most of my high school history teachers went into the profession).

It's really just a matter of your priorities and what you want out of life. On the bright side, you need the same bachelors degree for both, so you have some time to make up your mind.
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Old May 27th, 2015, 11:56 AM   #13

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Just know that high school teaching today is less about the students learning and more about keeping them in line. It's very demanding mentally, unless you happen to go to a school where that happens less.

University teaching is more about discussing subjects in-depth with your students. Your biggest pressure is likely more research-related than student-related.
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Old June 22nd, 2015, 05:14 PM   #14

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BAs are worthless in the USA these days. Most Bachelor degrees are. Even low-skilled jobs require a college degree just to get an interview. So you will need a post-graduate degree of some kind and, as has been said, history teachers are a "dime a dozen". Don't count on getting a teaching job in a decent university unless you are very good or have family connections so that leaves Community College and High School. I've been told by several people who have recently graduated that the cost of a post-graduate degree in any reputable college in the USA today will put you in debt for the rest of your life on a standard salary in the public education system. I'd suggest doing the math yourself. How much debt will you be in when you complete a post-graduate degree? What is the annual income of a typical teacher? What will your cost of living be? Usually you have to decide whether you want a house mortgage or a Masters because you won't be able to afford both within your lifetime.

I can't vote in the above poll because none of the options are viable when you first leave High School. My personal advice would be to get a degree in something that will earn you a decent income such as engineering, accounting, architecture, law, etc. Once you are established and have any debt under control, then you can go back to college part time and study history (using credit from your previous degree to speed things along). If it works out, you can move into teaching history as a career. If it does not, you can fall back on your other qualifications.

Last edited by Dan Howard; June 22nd, 2015 at 05:51 PM.
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Old June 22nd, 2015, 05:18 PM   #15

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Becoming a professor sounds like the lesser of two evils, to me.
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Old June 22nd, 2015, 05:46 PM   #16

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Howard View Post
BAs are worthless in the USA these days. Most degrees are. Even low-skilled jobs require a college degree just to get an interview. So you will need a post-graduate degree of some kind and, as has been said, history teachers are a "dime a dozen". Don't count on getting a teaching job in a decent university unless you are very good or have family connections so that leaves Community College and High School. I've been told by several people who have recently graduated that the cost of a post-graduate degree in any reputable college in the USA today will put you in debt for the rest of your life on a standard salary in the public education system. I'd suggest doing the math yourself. How much debt will you be in when you complete a post-graduate degree? What is the annual income of a typical teacher? What will your cost of living be? Usually you have to decide whether you want a house mortgage or a Masters because you won't be able to afford both within your lifetime.

I can't vote in the above poll because none of the options are viable when you first leave school. My personal advice would be to get a degree in something that will earn you a decent income such as engineering, accounting, architecture, law, etc. Once you are established and have any debt under control, then you can go back to college part time and study history (using credit from your previous degree to speed things along). If it works out you can move into teaching history as a career. If it does not, you can fall back on your other qualifications.
There is no way I could be an architect, lawyer, or engineer.

I'm confident that I could get a local high school teaching job.
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Old June 22nd, 2015, 05:52 PM   #17

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There is no way I could be an architect, lawyer, or engineer.
But there will be something that you could train for that doesn't involve teaching. You just have to work out what it is.

Quote:
I'm confident that I could get a local high school teaching job.
COST AND RETURN. The cost of a post graduate degree in the USA these days is ridiculous. How long will it take to pay off your student debts on a teacher's salary? In some cases people are better off with no debt and flipping burgers rather than teaching high school with student loans hanging around their neck. They end up digging themselves deeper into the hole (student debt cannot usually be discharged through bankruptcy). All I'm saying is that you have to be careful; forget about your feelings, do some research, and run the numbers. If you can get a scholarship or your parents can afford to help pay for your education then history teaching might be the way to go. But you need a fall-back plan.

Last edited by Dan Howard; June 22nd, 2015 at 06:15 PM.
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Old June 22nd, 2015, 06:23 PM   #18

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Howard View Post
COST AND RETURN. The cost of a post graduate degree in the USA these days is ridiculous. How long will it take to pay off your student debts on a teacher's salary? In some cases people are better off with no debt and flipping burgers rather than teaching high school with student loans hanging around their neck. They end up digging themselves deeper into the hole (student debt cannot usually be discharged through bankruptcy). All I'm saying is that you have to be careful; forget about your feelings, do some research, and run the numbers. If you can get a scholarship or your parents can afford to help pay for your education then history teaching might be the way to go. But you need a fall-back plan.
My college is actually pretty cheap and with scholarships I'll have 95% of it paid off. So I won't need to borrow anything.
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Old June 25th, 2015, 05:10 AM   #19

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My college is actually pretty cheap and with scholarships I'll have 95% of it paid off. So I won't need to borrow anything.
A regular degree or a post graduate one? You won't get a teaching job with a Bachelors any more. Everyone has one of those. You need to work out the cost of completing post-grad.
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Old June 25th, 2015, 06:59 PM   #20

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Originally Posted by Dan Howard View Post
A regular degree or a post graduate one? You won't get a teaching job with a Bachelors any more. Everyone has one of those. You need to work out the cost of completing post-grad.
Actually in my city, most of the high school teachers were able to get in with a standard 4 year program. They just got majors in "Education in (insert area here)".
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