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Old August 25th, 2017, 03:53 AM   #1

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Dead slaves


During the transatlantic voyages what was the number of slaves who died and were thrown into the sea.
The mapping indicates that 12.5 million have left the African coast during the period of slavery, that is, the death toll would be around 2.5 million.
Will be correct this number 2.5 million that died during the transportation of slaves, say opinions.
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Old August 27th, 2017, 10:10 AM   #2

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Originally Posted by LatinoEuropa View Post
During the transatlantic voyages what was the number of slaves who died and were thrown into the sea.
The mapping indicates that 12.5 million have left the African coast during the period of slavery, that is, the death toll would be around 2.5 million.
Will be correct this number 2.5 million that died during the transportation of slaves, say opinions.
Where did you get these numbers?
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Old August 28th, 2017, 01:47 PM   #3

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About a third of all slaves died en route in the Middle Passage. So if about 15 million slaves disembarked Africa from c. 1500-1850 AD/CE, then close to five million probably died or were otherwise thrown aboard (for being unruly, or as punishment for plotting revolts, etc.)
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Old August 29th, 2017, 11:09 AM   #4

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@LatinoEuropa

Your estimate of the number of slaves ferried across the Atlantic seems low indeed.

I've recently seen numbers for the death rate of slaves carried from Gulf of Guinea to Portugal in the late 15th century and it was at 5% on average by trip. In most cases it was lower, but there were a few bad trips. However the voyage when not one slave died were very rare, even despite the relatively low numbers of people carried by each ship (often less than 50).
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Old August 29th, 2017, 11:44 AM   #5

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Hello maharbbal the numbers are not mine, it's from a website.
I also think a small number, the numbers should be bigger.
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Old August 29th, 2017, 01:09 PM   #6
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The roughly 12,5 million slaves departing from Africa in the Atlantic slave trade seems correct for me

see: African Slavery: some data with tables and sources there

I don't know though how many of them had arrived to the Americas.
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Old August 29th, 2017, 01:35 PM   #7

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The roughly 12,5 million slaves departing from Africa in the Atlantic slave trade seems correct for me

see: African Slavery: some data with tables and sources there

I don't know though how many of them had arrived to the Americas.

The departure may be correct, but the arrival in the Americas may be wrong 2.5 million as said in my opinion were more that did not arrive in the Americas
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Old August 29th, 2017, 03:22 PM   #8

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Originally Posted by notgivenaway View Post
About a third of all slaves died en route in the Middle Passage. So if about 15 million slaves disembarked Africa from c. 1500-1850 AD/CE, then close to five million probably died or were otherwise thrown aboard (for being unruly, or as punishment for plotting revolts, etc.)
That figure is utter rubbish. 33% fatality rate!!!

Slaves are money, dead slaves = no money.

5-10% sounds like a more realistic figure, and it is indeed the figure used by most historians without an axe to grind. Common sense will tell you this figure can not be correct as any slaver who routinely lost 33% of his cargo would be out of business very quickly.
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Old August 29th, 2017, 03:32 PM   #9

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That figure is utter rubbish. 33% fatality rate!!!

Slaves are money, dead slaves = no money.

5-10% sounds like a more realistic figure, and it is indeed the figure used by most historians without an axe to grind. Common sense will tell you this figure can not be correct as any slaver who routinely lost 33% of his cargo would be out of business very quickly.
I've always assume it was the same logic as industrial egg farms today. You put chickens in cramped quarters and they die earlier and lay less eggs per batch, but you can ultimately get more eggs and more money by cramming as many as possible into as cramped of a space as possible.

I don't know though. What are these figures based on?
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Old August 29th, 2017, 06:36 PM   #10

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Chicken farming isnt a bad comparison.

A slave has to arrive in a healthy condition in order to be sold at a good profit. A voyage that kills 33% of the merchandise is also likely to ruin the health of the rest and make them of low value.

Slave ships varied between two methods, the loose packers who are your free range healthy option, they'll take a limited number of slaves and make sure theyre well fed and excercised so they arrive in prime saleable condition.

then you have the tight packers, your battery farmers who will cram as many bodies in as possible with the minimum amount of food and try to rush across the Atlantic as soon as the weather allows the start of a trading season.

If they make it across in time they have maximum cargo for maximum profit, if they hit bad weather and delays they'll run out of food quick, if theres disease in overcowded ships, if anything goes wrong theyre FUBAR.

Of course most Captains would fit in between these two extremes which is why there was a constant business on shore of facilities to feed up slaves and get them healed from the stress of the passage so they were available for sale in prime condition.
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