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Old December 26th, 2017, 12:52 AM   #21
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Here's based on the historical differences.

Fascism is post monarchist far right thought that tends to require a formerly "great" nation(or the perception of such by the citizens) in "decline". Decline is blamed on internal and/or external scapegoats and the Fascists , typically but not exclusively led by a charismatic leader who promises to end the decline by removing the scapegoat and restoring the nations former glory.

Nazism is Fascism when the scapegoat mentioned above is drawn along religious, racial or generally demographic lines. For example thinking a country's past racial demographics is ideal and that the influx of (insert group here) that changed this is a problem that needs to be corrected is an example of Nazism or neo-Nazism. Another example would be blaming a minority group for being allegedly disloyal(more along the lines of what the German Nazi's did). Examples of non Nazi Fascism would see the scapegoat or problem being something non racial, like a foreign nation or domestic political opposition, things like that.

Last edited by Emperor of Wurttemburg 43; December 26th, 2017 at 12:58 AM.
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Old December 26th, 2017, 02:07 AM   #22
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What defines nazism?

- Racism
- Antisemitism
- Eugenics
- Militarism
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Old December 29th, 2017, 02:31 PM   #23

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Alpine Luke made a good summary of the ideological bases of Nazism. I would like to add one of the most important aspects of Nazism: the Fuhrer State. Also, one of the most telling mottoes of the Nazis state: Ein Reich, Ein Volk, Ein Fuhrer.

In the Nazi Fuhrer State, all power and authority were derived from the person of the Fuhrer himself, and hence the phenomenon of 'working towards the Fuhrer' which was so important for Nazi officials.

To summarize it, one of the most important characteristics of Nazi regime is the total subordination to the Fuhrer, who takes all responsibility in the state, but also expects total loyalty from his subjects.

While it meant the centralization of power in the hands of the fuhrer, it also created chaos in the lower echelons of power, who all fought to obtain Hitler's support by 'working towards the Fuhrer' (this is why it's interesting to note how many prominent Nazis after the war defended themselves by saying they only obeyed orders).

But, the most defining aspect of both Nazism and Fascism in my opinion is struggle. Both were in essence Social-Darwinist, in the sense they viewed the whole history of mankind as that of a violent struggle between races, where the weak perish and the strong endure.

All other ideological tenants of Nazism stem from this, and we can find evidence in Hitler's view that war represents the natural state of men.
In a way, it can also be said that Nazi ideologists saw struggle as a kind of catalyst that enabled human progress.
Unlike liberal ideologies, Nazism (and Fascism) emphasized that the individual is less important compared to the collective, the state, to which he owed complete loyalty.

That being said, it should not be hard to understand the causes behind total disregard of human life the Nazis showed during the war. The individual, was after all, expendable, according to Hitler's own words, but the state continued to live on.

Last edited by Valens; December 29th, 2017 at 02:50 PM.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 04:13 PM   #24

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Nazism is simply a totalitarian movement like any other. The definitions of any such group also apply to Nazism.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 04:40 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Belgarion View Post
Nazism is simply a totalitarian movement like any other.
I agree. It's easy to try to think that there are founding principles at work. But it's all just political opportunism.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 04:47 PM   #26

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apicius View Post
I agree. It's easy to try to think that there are founding principles at work. But it's all just political opportunism.
Not entirely true. Hitler employed opportune methods to obtain power, but once he did that, he focused entirely on his ideological goals which had been determined during his formative years.

It would be wrong to think of the Nazis as some kind of opportunists. Their methods were opportune, when it suited them, but it doesn't mean they compromised their core ideological goals.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 05:03 PM   #27
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I don't think that's true. There's no shortage of examples of hypocritical behavior by the Nazi elite.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 05:09 PM   #28

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apicius View Post
I don't think that's true. There's no shortage of examples of hypocritical behavior by the Nazi elite.
Hypocritical behavior doesn't exclude commitment to ideological principles.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 09:49 PM   #29
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Quote:
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Hypocritical behavior doesn't exclude commitment to ideological principles.
Yes, it is true that ideological principles informed opportunist policies.

I think it is difficult for someone of this age, particularly a Briton, American, Australian, Canadian etc; to understand how countries perceived one another in continental Europe during the inter-war years.

Nazi ideas had their roots in the 19th century, and unless you've read German history in the 19th century through to the rise of Nazi Germany, then you can't really understand Nazi Germany and what made it tick.

I would also recommend a museum in East Berlin devoted to German-Russo relations. The outlandish propaganda from both sides serves to show the fear, loathing and utter contempt they had for one another. It was an eye-opener for this Englishman: I was stood open-mouthed looking at some of the posters, out-right bizarre. But, to them, these ideas had merit. Upon visiting this museum, the penny will drop that these people didn't do political business like the British or Americans. You have to look at the rise of Nazi Germany through German eyes of that period.
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