Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > European History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

European History European History Forum - Western and Eastern Europe including the British Isles, Scandinavia, Russia


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 30th, 2017, 04:24 PM   #21

Shtajerc's Avatar
last real Windischer
 
Joined: Jul 2014
From: Lower Styria, Slovenia
Posts: 5,659

Interesting that Elisabeth II got mentioned a few times but her father George VI didn't. I like him.
Shtajerc is offline  
Remove Ads
Old December 30th, 2017, 04:41 PM   #22

dreuxeng's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2015
From: England
Posts: 1,081

Quote:
Originally Posted by notgivenaway View Post
Of all time though, for me it's a toss up between Athelstan, Edgar the Peaceful, Edward Longshanks, Edward III, Henry VII, Elizabeth II, and Charles II.
Not Edward the elder ?
dreuxeng is offline  
Old December 30th, 2017, 05:33 PM   #23

Lord Fairfax's Avatar
Tickling the Dragons tail
 
Joined: Jan 2015
From: Rupert's Land ;)
Posts: 2,403

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edric Streona View Post
England - Edward III
He failed to ensure a smooth succession, his grandson Richard II was deposed less than 25 years after he died
Lord Fairfax is online now  
Old December 30th, 2017, 07:38 PM   #24

JM1906's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2014
From: Portugal
Posts: 1,449

Elizabeth I had to face serious challenges and life threating menaces from inside and outside England.
Analysing the ratio "greatest-odds to be great" she may be the one.
JM1906 is online now  
Old December 31st, 2017, 04:35 AM   #25

llywelyn ap gruffydd's Avatar
Citizen
 
Joined: Mar 2017
From: scotland via wales
Posts: 21

Henry II of England took many beatings from the welsh, even when he took his army of 30,000 into wales he come off second best.

When Henry II of England nearly lost his life to the Welsh

forces of Henry II of England Vs an alliance of Welsh princes led by Owain Gwynedd.

Henry II, who planned to conquer Wales and so expand the Angevin Empire, raised an army at Oswestry to march to the Berwyn mountains, via the Ceiriog Valley, in the summer of 1165

Owain, hearing of the invasion, raised an army at Corwen in response, comprising forces from all over Wales. Including his own forces of Gwynedd, led by himself and his brother Cadwaladr, the alliance of princes was made up of men from Deheubarth, under the leadership of Rhys ap Gruffudd, and troops from Powys

Henry's army had the advantage of greater numbers, so Owain's tactics were to raid and ambush.
When Henry's army advanced into the densely wooded Ceiriog Valley, the Welsh defenders assailed them repeatedly from their positions of cover.

Realising the vulnerability of his army, Henry II ordered 2000 woodsmen to clear trees and widen the passage, allowing his forces to move more freely and quickly through the pass.

The woodsmen were protected by the best of Henry's army and a powerful vanguard of pikemen, but their resistance was only effective for a short period.
While the woodsmen cut the trees – his forces were ambushed at the point of Offa's Dyke (which then straddled the valley floor) at the point where "The Great Oak of the Gate of the Dead" now stands. – a strong force of Owain's troops emerged and assaulted Henry's vanguard, inflicting severe losses.
This engagement was later known as the Battle of Crogen.

Henry came within a whisker of losing his life, if not for the brave action of Hugh de St Clare, the Constable of Oakwood Castle, who sacrificed his own life when he threw himself in front of a shaft meant for his King. The English forces disengaged and did indeed reach the Berwyn mountains but, hit hard by the Welsh armies, were forced to retreat from Wales altogether when Owain's forces succeeded in cutting off their supplies

His attempt at suppression of the Welsh and gaining control of Wales a failure, Henry II ordered Welsh hostages to be brought to him at Shrewsbury, and there oversaw the mutilation of twenty-two prisoners, two of whom were Owain's sons.Forced to abandon the conquest of Wales, Henry returned to his court at Anjou, while retaliation for the twenty-two tortured hostages was carried out on Normans throughout the Welsh lands.
llywelyn ap gruffydd is offline  
Old December 31st, 2017, 07:22 PM   #26

notgivenaway's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2015
From: UK
Posts: 5,059

Quote:
Originally Posted by dreuxeng View Post
Not Edward the elder ?
A good king, but then relied a lot on his sister Lady Athelflead. Both helped to reconquer the Danelaw.
notgivenaway is offline  
Old December 31st, 2017, 07:24 PM   #27

notgivenaway's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2015
From: UK
Posts: 5,059

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Fairfax View Post
He failed to ensure a smooth succession, his grandson Richard II was deposed less than 25 years after he died
Primogeniture was fixed then, and it's not his fault his son died before him. Richard II was an oaf, who got deposed because of his misrule. I don't think his deposition or the eventual Wars of the Roses, can be blamed on any one individual. Maybe had Henry V not died when he did, it would have changed things.
notgivenaway is offline  
Old January 1st, 2018, 04:09 AM   #28

dreuxeng's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2015
From: England
Posts: 1,081

Quote:
Originally Posted by notgivenaway View Post
A good king, but then relied a lot on his sister Lady Athelflead. Both helped to reconquer the Danelaw.
What about the diplomatic instinct. The best rulers are those that command the respect and loyalty of others, and other rulers, but also choose the best course of action even if that means working in alliance with others.
dreuxeng is offline  
Old January 1st, 2018, 04:14 AM   #29

dreuxeng's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2015
From: England
Posts: 1,081

Quote:
Originally Posted by notgivenaway View Post
Primogeniture was fixed then, and it's not his fault his son died before him. Richard II was an oaf, who got deposed because of his misrule. I don't think his deposition or the eventual Wars of the Roses, can be blamed on any one individual. Maybe had Henry V not died when he did, it would have changed things.
He was very close to and adored his wife throughout his life. Obviously beating the Duke of Suffolk with a staff, in front of a packed out Westminster Abbey is a bit mental !
dreuxeng is offline  
Old January 4th, 2018, 06:07 PM   #30

Valens's Avatar
Puer Senex
 
Joined: Feb 2014
From: Colonia Valensiana
Posts: 7,863
Blog Entries: 19

I've always considered Henry VIII to be the most powerful English/British monarch, even though 'powerful' and 'greatest' are two different categories.
Valens is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > European History

Tags
british, english, english or british, kings, monarch, monarchs, queens



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The greatest English/British monarch. stevev European History 4 September 15th, 2017 06:01 PM
Which British\English monarch has history been most unfair to? Balian General History 74 June 22nd, 2016 12:52 PM
Greatest English monarch Darren Singh European History 12 January 11th, 2016 02:26 PM
Greatest British monarch Darren Singh European History 2 May 2nd, 2015 05:04 AM
Greatest English Monarch Numa_is_the_boyo European History 122 July 6th, 2010 05:27 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.