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Old December 30th, 2017, 08:37 AM   #1
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What city have deeper and biggest docks in Europe 1939


I need this information - what city in Europe on 1939 have the biggest docks i need name of the city , depth of docks and width
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Old December 30th, 2017, 09:00 AM   #2
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Port of Mahon. 6km long, up to 1200 metres width, depth 30m, 2nd deepest in the world.
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Old December 30th, 2017, 10:42 AM   #3
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"The largest vessels in the world visit the Port of Rotterdam. This is due to the depth of the port, up to almost 23 metres (the height of an eight-storey block of flats), and thanks to the Eurogeul, a channel in the North Sea stretching for 57 kilometres and with a guaranteed depth of 25 metres.Aug 16, 2013" Port of Rotterdam

Most likely Rotterdam was the deepest and overall largest commercial port in Europe in 1939. It was heavily damaged by intense German bombing in 1940.

Last edited by stevev; December 30th, 2017 at 10:46 AM.
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Old December 30th, 2017, 11:21 AM   #4

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Tried to find stats on this. Couldn't get anything related to depth and size. One that comes to mind for me is the port of Danzig. According to this article, the port of Danzig handled more than 7 million tons in 1939:
https://www.portgdansk.pl/about-port/history

Here's another article that includes the information in graph form:
https://www.portgdansk.pl/about-port...nsk-in-numbers
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Old December 30th, 2017, 12:24 PM   #5

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1939 - London still the biggest port in the world, but international trade is disrupted with the outbreak of the Second World War

The 20th-century port - About maritime London - Port Cities

The Port of London stretches 25 miles along the river according to Wiki (much less as the crow flies)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_of_London

"The tidal River also varies in width along its length. It is 265 metres (870 feet) wide at London Bridge, 448 metres (1470 feet) at Woolwhich, 732 metres (2400 feet) at Gravesend (Tilbury) and about 8 km (5 miles) between Shoeburyness and Sheerness."

Tilbury can take ships with draughts of 13.7 metres today, presumably the same in 1939, much less the further up river you go, about 11/12 metres in the main docklands, Isle of Dogs area.
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Old December 30th, 2017, 02:46 PM   #6

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkLady View Post
I need this information - what city in Europe on 1939 have the biggest docks i need name of the city , depth of docks and width
Biggest docks - as in the largest dock capacity?
Or able to berth the largest ships?
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Old December 30th, 2017, 10:43 PM   #7

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Rotterdam surpassed the Port of London in tonnage handled in the 1960s when the London Dockers refused to handle containers.
The Liberty ships during WWII had a draught of 8.5 metres and would assemble off HMS Leigh (Southend Pier) inside the Shoebury Boom, incoming waiting for pilot ships to take them up river, out going waiting for the convoy to assemble.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Richard_Montgomery

Today the Thames Gateway Port just upriver of Southend Pier can handle the world's largest container ships which have a draught of 16 metres.
Milford Haven, Wales, is the deepest UK port and can handle ships with 22 metre draught
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Old December 31st, 2017, 04:48 AM   #8
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I thought the OP might be asking about drydocks. Harland and Wolfe in Belfast, where the Titanic had been built, had one of the larger drydocks at 850 feet (259 metres) in length and 100 feet (30.48 metres) wide.

The French liner Normandie was built in St. Nazaire (length 350 meters, 1,150 ft, width 50 meters, 160 ft). In 1940, the battle damaged Bismarck made for St. Nazaire specifically to take advantage of this large drydock.
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Old December 31st, 2017, 08:43 AM   #9

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chlodio View Post
I thought the OP might be asking about drydocks. Harland and Wolfe in Belfast, where the Titanic had been built, had one of the larger drydocks at 850 feet (259 metres) in length and 100 feet (30.48 metres) wide.

The French liner Normandie was built in St. Nazaire (length 350 meters, 1,150 ft, width 50 meters, 160 ft). In 1940, the battle damaged Bismarck made for St. Nazaire specifically to take advantage of this large drydock.
The maximum draught of 1939 era ships appears to be 11 metres, Bismarck had draught of 9.3m, HMS Hood 9.8m.
Bismarck was built in Hamburg, which takes the 16m draught super container ships today. The Hood was built in Clydebank, Scotland.

Before the Thames Gateway opened to the 16m draught ships, there was a daily Hamburg Line shuttle to Tilbury container port.
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Old December 31st, 2017, 09:02 AM   #10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chlodio View Post
I thought the OP might be asking about drydocks. Harland and Wolfe in Belfast, where the Titanic had been built, had one of the larger drydocks at 850 feet (259 metres) in length and 100 feet (30.48 metres) wide.
RMS Queen Mary, built at John Brown Clydebank, was almost 1000' long, LBP
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