Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > European History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

European History European History Forum - Western and Eastern Europe including the British Isles, Scandinavia, Russia


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 11th, 2018, 01:55 PM   #11
Archivist
 
Joined: Dec 2017
From: America
Posts: 126

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnincornwall View Post
There's a lot of nonsense spoken about Cornwall and it's language. Cornwall is one of England's counties, nothing else. Cornish was spoken in more remote areas - when I was younger the last old lady who spoke Cornish as a native lived somewhere down St Ives way and was about 96 when she died.

Nowadays some clowns have revived it as a language (heaven knows why), people study it and there are said to be about 200 speakers of 'Cornish'. It's a measure of how stupid things get when we have had to pay (government grant of course) to have all out road signs in dual language. A language which some committee or person makes up new words for every day to take account of the modern world. Another ridiculous point - it's long been inherent in Cornish dialect that the word Parc be used instead of Park. Everyone assumed it's just been around forever. So now if you get a road like xxxxx Parc, the English name version of the name is xxxxx Parc, whilst underneath is the alleged Cornish version xxxxx Park - can you believe that!

You have to remember that the ports of Fowey and Falmouth were strong naval ports, that there were significant battles of the Civil War in Cornwall. It's just like any other county. No mention of funny languages. It's just like someone said, the remote hill mining areas will have held it longest - but a long time ago!

As Edric says the accent can be something else, maybe not recogniseable as English. In the salad days of my 18-30s holidays if we didn't want Greek waiters to understand what we were talking about, the lads and I could slip into a deep, fast Cornish accent!
I agree mostly. It had died a natural death a long time ago. What's next, are people going to revive Cumbrian? Is all of England (or at least western England) going to be re-Brythonified/re-Welshified? Would southwest Scotland be next after that?

By the way, how common are dual signs in Cornish and English?
Dzmeka is offline  
Remove Ads
Old January 11th, 2018, 02:48 PM   #12
Dilettante
 
Joined: Sep 2013
From: Wirral
Posts: 3,979

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dzmeka View Post
Is all of England (or at least western England) going to be re-Brythonified/re-Welshified?
Our ambitions are realistic.
GogLais is offline  
Old January 12th, 2018, 01:30 AM   #13

johnincornwall's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2010
From: Cornwall
Posts: 6,146

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dzmeka View Post
I agree mostly. It had died a natural death a long time ago. What's next, are people going to revive Cumbrian? Is all of England (or at least western England) going to be re-Brythonified/re-Welshified? Would southwest Scotland be next after that?

By the way, how common are dual signs in Cornish and English?
Direction signs no, but every street name sign and some tourist signs. Funded by some central grant as I said above.

Lunacy.
johnincornwall is offline  
Old January 12th, 2018, 02:23 AM   #14
Dilettante
 
Joined: Sep 2013
From: Wirral
Posts: 3,979

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnincornwall View Post
Direction signs no, but every street name sign and some tourist signs. Funded by some central grant as I said above.

Lunacy.
Maybe I don't represent Mr Average Tourist but I'd be interested in visiting a part of a country that has its own distinctive language and culture.
GogLais is offline  
Old January 12th, 2018, 03:59 AM   #15
Historian
 
Joined: Oct 2014
From: appalacian Mtns
Posts: 3,859

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dzmeka View Post
The average American has never heard of Cornish of Breton and doesn't know they exist, let alone that they're related to Welsh.
There's a bit of a misunderstanding there. The so called Americans were middle aged mine supervisors born & raised in 19th century England. Yes they became Americans as did the Cornish miners they were supervising. But I would assume when a 19th century English supervisor says his workcrew is Cornish that we can believe him. There was no motivation too lie, in fact the opposite, they were looking for someone who could translate.

Last edited by M9Powell; January 12th, 2018 at 04:07 AM.
M9Powell is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > European History

Tags
cornish, revival



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Gnostic revival Prima Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology 0 January 31st, 2016 12:58 AM
Possibility of a Sanskrit revival similar to Hebrew revival greatstreetwarrior Asian History 231 November 11th, 2015 09:37 AM
British(especially Cornish) 19th century history Kingarthur99 European History 5 August 21st, 2015 06:58 AM
Is Cornish an ethnicity? Emperor Trajan European History 121 July 18th, 2014 04:54 AM
Blues Revival '60s DAS44 History Help 12 April 1st, 2011 11:14 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.