Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > European History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

European History European History Forum - Western and Eastern Europe including the British Isles, Scandinavia, Russia


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 11th, 2018, 12:11 PM   #21
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Belgium
Posts: 1,234

Sorry guys I hadn't read up to the last message, when I just wrote my message...

Hmm, rather sarcastic

Kind regards from Paul.
PaulRyckier is offline  
Remove Ads
Old January 11th, 2018, 12:23 PM   #22
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Belgium
Posts: 1,234

Quote:
Originally Posted by authun View Post
Geordies are english of course but are less influenced by the norse than Yorkshire was. They were rather more influenced by the lowland scots than the south of England and they claim to be much more friendly and trusting, always telling you how you could leave your door open. Well, my landlady did leave the door open and I got my camera equipment stolen, so I wouldn't recommend it. There are lots of jibes between those north of the Tyne and those south of it. Infact, Syemon of Durham writing at the end of the 11th cent/beginning of the 12th cent. wrote that the land between the Tyne and Tees was thick with forest and infested with wolves and thieves. Geordies will tell you cheerfully that it still is.

They are much more tolerant of southerns than the southerns are of them. Geordies would take great offence at the remarks about them. No right minded southerner would go to a bar in Newcastle and repeat those remarks.

This is a north eastern views of the british isles:

Click the image to open in full size.


and this is a southern english view of the british isles:

Click the image to open in full size.



As you can see, no one is discussing ethnic heritage. It just isn't something that people think about. They will make jokes about stereotypes, but that's it.
"As you can see, no one is discussing ethnic heritage. It just isn't something that people think about. They will make jokes about stereotypes, but that's it"

Just as overhere dear Authun.
The Dutch jokes about that stupid Belgians and Belgians about those perfide "Hollanders" and stingy too..."als je niet bedrogen bent van 'n Hollander, het is dat hij het vergeten heeft" if you aren't cheated by a Dutchman, it is that he has forgotten it"
Willempie, don't start now with the stupid Belgian jokes...please...as they sometimes are more vitriolic than the Dutch jokes...

Kind regards from Paul.
PaulRyckier is offline  
Old January 11th, 2018, 12:49 PM   #23
Archivist
 
Joined: Dec 2017
From: America
Posts: 132

I am fairly confident that almost nobody in the UK even knows what a Germanic is. It would be pretty rare to meet someone who has ever heard that word. I don't think most non-English Germanics would either know of such a word, but I could be wrong, but it probably wouldn't be as rare to encounter one that did hear of the word 'Germanic' as it would be to encounter an Englishman that heard of the word.

The Old English certainly acknowledged their Germanic ties, self-identifying their nationality as 'Theodish' (þēodisc). Germanic was their nationality and Angle, Saxon, Frisian, Jute, etc. was the name of their tribe.
Dzmeka is offline  
Old January 11th, 2018, 01:03 PM   #24
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Belgium
Posts: 1,234

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevev View Post
I have Flemish ancestry. I speak a "Germanic" language (English). Do I consider myself Germanic? Hell no!
stevev,

" Do I consider myself Germanic? Hell no!"

If you think about "Germanic" as German and worser adhering to the "Blut und Boden" theory (the genetic heritage and the adhering to the "soil") then you are completely right.

"I have Flemish ancestry"

Real Flemish? I mean from the County of Flanders, the real Flemings as we are ? The others from the constructed! 19th century Flanders are Brabanders and speak nearly another language as "Antwaaaaarps" and those from Limburg you can't even understand at all, that long time lived in the shadow of the bishop of Liège.

English a Germanic language? Yes a Germanic backbone, but with half of the words Latin or French...
mean: menen, meinen Germanic
county: comté French
real: réel French
as: als als wie Germanic
we: wij wir Germanic
the: de die Germanic
others: autres French Germanic? anderen anderen
constructed : construé Latin Germanic geconstrueerde aufgebaute?
century Latin, French siècle Dutch eeuw German Jahrhundert
speak: spreken sprechen Germanic
language: langage French Dutch taal, German Sprache
understand: verstaan verstehen Germanic
that: dat dass Germanic
long: Dutch lang, German lang, French: long, longue
time: Dutch tijd, German Zeit, French: temps, Latin tempus
shadow: schaduw Schatten Germanic

Kind regards, Paul.
PaulRyckier is offline  
Old January 11th, 2018, 01:15 PM   #25
Scholar
 
Joined: Jan 2017
From: Durham
Posts: 939

Quote:
Originally Posted by notgivenaway View Post

It's not a matter of consideration. It's fact.

England, and Britain to a wider extent, is more culturally akin to the Netherlands and Germany than France, Spain, or Italy.
It is certainly not a fact that England is culturally closer to Germany rather than France. A strong case could be together to argue that we have more in common with France.
Peaceful is offline  
Old January 11th, 2018, 01:21 PM   #26
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Belgium
Posts: 1,234

Quote:
Originally Posted by Korfanty View Post
No, proper fascists were Mediterranean and Roman supremacists. Fascism was born in Italy.
Korfanty,

nazis were also fascists, they only upgraded it to the "Blut und Boden" theory, we the "Übermenschen" with the right "blut" (Lucky that they didn't know yet about genetics and had to stick to blood and physiognomy) have right to our "boden" our soil...

Kind regards, Paul.
PaulRyckier is offline  
Old January 11th, 2018, 01:36 PM   #27
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Belgium
Posts: 1,234

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peaceful View Post
It is certainly not a fact that England is culturally closer to Germany rather than France. A strong case could be together to argue that we have more in common with France.
Peaceful,

of course you are right...I have that many times met English people (sorry: British), French ones and German ones and indeed in my humble opinion French and Brits are more comparable in their manners and language...perhaps because of their colonial past...? And in the past there were that many contacts as the Normans and the hundred years war and all . I find that we too the Belgians are closer to the French than to the Germans...even those of the North: the Flemings

Kind regards, Paul.
PaulRyckier is offline  
Old January 11th, 2018, 05:47 PM   #28
Historian
 
Joined: Apr 2017
From: Las Vegas, NV USA
Posts: 1,594

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulRyckier View Post
stevev,


"I have Flemish ancestry"

Real Flemish? I mean from the County of Flanders, the real Flemings as we are ? The others from the constructed! 19th century Flanders are Brabanders and speak nearly another language as "Antwaaaaarps" and those from Limburg you can't even understand at all, that long time lived in the shadow of the bishop of Liège.
I honesty don't know. My American ancestor settled in what is now Orange County, New York in 1635. His first name was "Dirk". I was always told we were Dutch, but the family name begins with "van de" not "van der". A Netherlander told me I was Flemish, not Dutch. There is now no difference in the official language, but there are obviously dialects,
stevev is online now  
Old January 11th, 2018, 11:58 PM   #29
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2012
From: Northern part of European lowland
Posts: 2,194

By thwe way: The very words "Germanic" and "Celt" are first known from roman or greek sources? But those came from a distance, and may not reflect how people saw themselves.
Fantasus is offline  
Old January 12th, 2018, 12:29 AM   #30

johnincornwall's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2010
From: Cornwall
Posts: 6,394

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulRyckier View Post
Peaceful,

of course you are right...I have that many times met English people (sorry: British), .
'English' will be fine

Oh Lord I see higher up the thread we've got the dreaded random photos again!
johnincornwall is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > European History

Tags
dutch, engnlishdutchand, family, germanic, nordic, nordicpeople, wider



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Assyrian Empire wider than it suppose to be? Ashur Ancient History 4 March 24th, 2015 03:18 AM
Latching on fragments - rather than confronting the wider picture Brisieis Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology 4 December 17th, 2014 06:11 AM
How aware were pre-Columbian Natives of the wider world? Salah American History 10 July 26th, 2014 04:07 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.