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Old January 12th, 2018, 02:53 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by PaulRyckier View Post
the same when I was in Scotland...they say the stingy Scotsmen... when we made a circuit by train and stayed in B and B...Scotsmen and women all that generous and friendly...you see stereotypes...
They say the same about people from Yorkshire Paul and there is a historicala reason. These were the last parts of the UK where the agricultural workers were paid at the end of the year, when the harvest was in and sold. They got their wages for a year and they would not get paid until the following year and, even then, they did not know how much they would be paid. So, they had to be very careful.

This prompted the rise of the savings banks, such as the Ruthwell Savings Bank, later to become the Trustee Savings Bank or TSB and the Yorkshire Penny Bank, now the Yorkshire Bank.

The bank in Ruthwell was opened and run by the local vicar. You had to tell him why you wanted to take money out and, if he didn't approve, he wouldn't let you withdraw it. Hence people were very very careful with their money.

https://www.savingsbanksmuseum.co.uk...s_history.html
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Old January 12th, 2018, 03:11 PM   #52
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Hasn't it been proven that all Europeans are at least 80% Beaker People and any differences are cosmetic or cultural since they moved from the Caucuses?
The current hypotheses under investigation are that in northern europe, there was a population crash at the end of the LBK and population numbers remained low until the TBK. The numbers rose but it is still unclear whether the increase was a new population or the old population recovering. The current interest is that small numbers of IE peoples entered western europe but that they were reproductively more successful and their numbers grew at a much faster rate than the remaining 'old population'. Words like 'explosive growth' and 'from zero to absolute majority' are bandied about.

According to these models, much of the population of northern europe is descended from the same small handful of men and, to some extent, women. That is why the degree of immigration into the british isles for example, from the continent since, is hard to quantify. There is also the question of how well studies of modern populations accurately reflect past migrations because the host population and the incoming population can grow at different rates so what was a smaller number can become a larger number. The dynamics are further complicated by females in the host population breeding with males from the incoming population. The main thing to remember is that these studies can only support or contradict the hypothesis being tested within the assumptions made in the model used. They are not proof.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 03:22 PM   #53
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What I do not understand is to say that the English language is Germanic, it has 60% Latin and 30% germanica the missing 10% can increase the Greek words Hebrew and Arabic.
Because languages belong to groups and members of a group are descended from a common ancestor. English is germanic, or more precisely a low west germanic language, because it descends from common germanic. The large number of latin words are mostly introduced into english via french in later centuries, but this doesn't alter the fact thata there was a time when old english didn't use those words. They are simply extra words.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 03:44 PM   #54

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Sounds similar to a comment made to me by a swedish businessman: "if you shake hands with a dutchman, count your fingers afterwards".

On the otherhand, I saw a man in Amsterdam dropa ten euro note after paying for drinks in a bar.When I picked I up and gave it to him, he was pleased and one minute later a free drink arrived at my table, "for your honesty". My daughter lost her passport in Amsterdam but later that day, there it was at the police station. Someone had handed it it. Stereotypes are not an exact science!
Went to Amsterdam with my wife and first born in the late 80's, while we were there my wife was the victim of a pickpocket, went with them to the police station to report it, got stuck in a broken down lift for over an hour.
Happy days

ps: Apart from this incident all the Dutch people we have met have been very nice, though I did find out the easiest way to upset a Dutch person is too mistake them for a German
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Old January 12th, 2018, 04:01 PM   #55
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ps: Apart from this incident all the Dutch people we have met have been very nice, though I did find out the easiest way to upset a Dutch person is too mistake them for a German
They're still bitter about that world cup final in 1974.
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Old January 13th, 2018, 02:03 AM   #56
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Because languages belong to groups and members of a group are descended from a common ancestor. English is germanic, or more precisely a low west germanic language, because it descends from common germanic. The large number of latin words are mostly introduced into english via french in later centuries, but this doesn't alter the fact thata there was a time when old english didn't use those words. They are simply extra words.
Authun,

"They are simply extra words"

It is therefore that those English can boast with their large vocabulary: They have for each concept an original word and an extra one...
Sorry, couldn't resist...
Btw: Thank you very much for your excellent message 52.

Kind regards, Paul.
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Old January 13th, 2018, 02:20 AM   #57
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Because languages belong to groups and members of a group are descended from a common ancestor. English is germanic, or more precisely a low west germanic language, because it descends from common germanic. The large number of latin words are mostly introduced into english via french in later centuries, but this doesn't alter the fact thata there was a time when old english didn't use those words. They are simply extra words.
Comparing the languages in an admittedly entirely unsystematic way I find much of the "basics" of english (including the more basic words) more similar to dansih and norwegian than to , say, the little french I know of.
That is also what I have read. And many words that are not so different but used in a slightly altered way.
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Old January 13th, 2018, 02:57 AM   #58
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It is therefore that those English can boast with their large vocabulary: They have for each concept an original word and an extra one...
Sorry, couldn't resist...
That is the case Paul. Take this piece of 11th century old english, an inscription on the sundial at Kirkdale Minster:

"Sanctus Gregorius Minster šonne hit węs ęl tobrocan and tofalan and he hit let macan newan"

One mostly sees this translated into modern english as:

"St Gregory's Minster when it was all ruined and collapsed and he caused it to be made new"

But it could use english words and be translated as

"St Gregory's Minster when it was all broken and fallen and he let it be made new"


The english words of broken, fallen and let have been replaced by 14th century to 16th century french latinised words ruined, collapsed, caused even though it is perfectly understandable using existing words of english origin.
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Old January 13th, 2018, 03:15 AM   #59
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Comparing the languages in an admittedly entirely unsystematic way I find much of the "basics" of english (including the more basic words) more similar to dansih and norwegian than to , say, the little french I know of.
That is also what I have read. And many words that are not so different but used in a slightly altered way.

Your observation is a valid line of linguistic research. This is what Graeme Davis writes in Comparative Syntax of Old English and Old Icelandic:

"It has long been recognised that Old English and Old Icelandic have a high proportion of common lexis and very similar morphology, yet the convention has been to emphasise the differences between the two as representatives respectively of the West and North sub-families of Germanic. The argument of this book is that the similar word-order of the two should instead lead us to stress the similarities between the two languages. Old English and Old Icelandic were sufficiently close to be mutually comprehensible. This thesis receives copious support from historical and literary texts. Our understanding of the Old Germanic world should be modified by the concept of a common «Northern Speech» which provided a common Germanic ethnic identity and a platform for the free flow of cultural ideas."


Old English and Old Icelandic are the two best preerved of the old languages and are better for comparing say, modern Swedish with modern English. However, I did notice that a swedish colleague of mine who speaks english but who had no knowledge of Old English, could understand OE passages to a large extent, at least, get the sense of what was being written about.

Last edited by authun; January 13th, 2018 at 03:22 AM.
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Old January 13th, 2018, 04:13 AM   #60
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Originally Posted by LatinoEuropa View Post
All countries that have the Latin alphabet.
It has words of Arabic Greek Latin haphazard origin.
What I do not understand is to say that the English language is Germanic, it has 60% Latin and 30% germanica the missing 10% can increase the Greek words Hebrew and Arabic.
The important point is not the sheer number of words - I don't know if 60% of Latinate origin is correct; but if you look at those words you'll see that a lot of them are obscure, formal and technical. There may be more Latinate words than Germanic words in English, but the Germanic words make up the bulk of common, everyday, language.

Look at the previous paragraph - about 75% Germanic words, by my count.
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