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Old February 8th, 2018, 03:18 PM   #1

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Visiting England


Not sure if this is the right theme but, Im going to be visiting the U.K in a few months, and it's my first time visiting. As some of you may know, I'm very interested in Anglo-Saxon history and medieval history, are there any sites such as museums, castles, landscapes, etc that could be recommended? Thanks! I will be traveling by myself for roughly 7-10 days, probably by train.
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Old February 8th, 2018, 04:27 PM   #2

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Blackpool is popular.

Maybe you should try fish and chips, some are horrible, but some are good, good sources tend to be closer to the sea, perhaps because they're closer to fish markets. Some fish and chips you get are soggy and horrible, some are crispy and good. It's not history, but still.
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Old February 8th, 2018, 05:13 PM   #3

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The Jorvik center in York was great fun when I was younger. Don’t know how it is now though.

Nottingham has the robin hood center which plays a bit fast and loose with the legend but is fun if youre with kids or interested in it. It also had a Victorian jail that was fun.
Some old medieval pubs are still in operation ... The Old Salutation, The Trip to Jerusalem and a third which escapes me.

Warwick Castle is one of my favorite castles to visit. But if you love castles I’ll say head to Wales. The English left Wales covered in castles and ruins of castles.

In Cornwall you have Tintagel which is also a ruin but still very interesting. Pendennis is one of my other favorite history spots. Old 16th century srtillery fort.

The Anglo Saxons have not left to many constructions. Tamworth castle is mainly Tudor in design I think despite being a Mercian city for many centuries. There are a handful of Saxon churches scattered about .... but not many.

Hastings might have something about the battle nearby. Most famous battles sites do. Bosworth is also worth visiting if you have a keen interest in medieval WoTRs era or battles.
I recommend looking at an English Heritage website to see if any events are happening nearby to where you are that takes your fancy.
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Old February 8th, 2018, 07:16 PM   #4

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Quote:
Originally Posted by The General View Post
Not sure if this is the right theme but, Im going to be visiting the U.K in a few months, and it's my first time visiting. As some of you may know, I'm very interested in Anglo-Saxon history and medieval history, are there any sites such as museums, castles, landscapes, etc that could be recommended? Thanks! I will be traveling by myself for roughly 7-10 days, probably by train.
General you are spoiled for choice. The problem will be deciding just what you will have time to see in only 10 days. The Tower of London, Westmister Abbey, Hampton Court, all in London. Too many castles to mention, but Bamburgh in Cumberland is one of my favorites. The Jarvik centre in York, Hadrians Wall, Edinburgh Castle.....the list goes on.
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Old February 8th, 2018, 07:46 PM   #5

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General you are spoiled for choice. The problem will be deciding just what you will have time to see in only 10 days. The Tower of London, Westmister Abbey, Hampton Court, all in London. Too many castles to mention, but Bamburgh in Cumberland is one of my favorites. The Jarvik centre in York, Hadrians Wall, Edinburgh Castle.....the list goes on.
well ill actually have an additional week of just London, so I was asking for primary places outside of London where I could visit. but thanks for the suggestions!
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Old February 8th, 2018, 08:04 PM   #6

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There is far too much of Britain to see in two weeks. You probably would benefit by focusing only on one region, rather than trying to "do" both southern England and the borderlands of the North. Berwick on Tweed is just south of the border has a nice little harbor, and has played a pivotal role in the long wars between England and Scotland. A short distance north will take you to Edinburgh, that may take at least a day. Off the coast lies Lindisfarne the Holy Isle, and first target of the Viking raids. Just south is Bamburg Castle an important defensive point for nearly 1500 years. The Armstrong family acquired the Castle, and has done (we are told) a great job of preserving the estate. Alinwick Castle is world famous for its gardens, and this is the mature Capability Brown.

You see how impossible it is? This tiny section of Northumberland, leaves much of that region un-visited.

Far further south is that part of Britain where so much of its history played out. Running down the entire west coast of the Island are the mountainous regions used a stronghold by Britains against invaders since time in memorial. Wales, the tough lads from whom Longshanks took the title "Prince of Wales" for his son, Edward the II.

But before that were the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms who pushed earlier inhabitants up into the hills. For them I think you might focus on the far southern coast. Salisbury and Winchester go back to Anglo-Saxon times before the Normans arrived in Hastings. The Battle site is something like seven miles outside Hastings, itself a holiday spot. The problem is that connecting the western part of Southern England to the East by rail, is you are confined to seeing the northern edges of the region from a speeding locomotive. On one hand you have Canterbury and Dover, and on the other Salisbury, Winchester, Portsmouth, and Bath. Neolithich England where a modern village stands in the midst of a neolithic hinge, a place that has seen the unfolding of the pageant of English history! The whole landscape is cluttered with examples of how the land was used by wave after wave of occupiers. How can we see the details of Salisbury and Winchester if a couple of days? Hardly time to unpack, and its already time to leave before you had have a chance to really dig in.

Each day you travel, especially by train, is a day you will lose in studying some particular point of interest. Packing, unpacking, sorting out schedules, finding the proper platform, and the time you spend watching the landscape speed by our window, are only added onto your coffee and kippers, and all the other things we find necessary to do during a day. You may be experiencing jet-lag for the first day or so, and that leaves a person less attentive than usual.

Plan ahead. Keep travel to the minimum. Trains are great, but they can really restrict where you are able to reach. Try to find appropriate accommodations in a central location where you might be able to reach several points of interest in a few hours. Public transportation, hired car, or shank's mare are how you have to get from bed to site and back. If you can make arrangements in advance, you might save some money. BTW, the best place to exchange currency is the nearest post office. Didn't learn that until near the end of our visit to Ireland.

I envy your opportunity, General. Enjoy it to the fullest.
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Old February 8th, 2018, 09:56 PM   #7

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Quote:
Originally Posted by The General View Post
Not sure if this is the right theme but, Im going to be visiting the U.K in a few months, and it's my first time visiting. As some of you may know, I'm very interested in Anglo-Saxon history and medieval history, are there any sites such as museums, castles, landscapes, etc that could be recommended? Thanks! I will be traveling by myself for roughly 7-10 days, probably by train.
Sutton Hoo Suffolk is a must visit for Anglo-Saxons.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/sutton-hoo
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Old February 8th, 2018, 10:17 PM   #8

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Sutton Hoo Suffolk is a must visit for Anglo-Saxons.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/sutton-hoo
This might help, London Liverpool Street station and change trains at Ipswich.

https://www.rome2rio.com/s/London/Sutton-Hoo

Woodbridge is on the opposite side of the river to Sutton Hoo but you need to go onto the next station, about a mile walk to the visitor center, not sure about taxis as it's a bit out in the sticks.
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Old February 8th, 2018, 11:04 PM   #9

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A couple more you could visit by train from London in a day.

1066 Battle of Hastings, Abbey and Battlefield | English Heritage

Arundel Castle & Gardens
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Old February 8th, 2018, 11:25 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The General View Post
Not sure if this is the right theme but, Im going to be visiting the U.K in a few months, and it's my first time visiting. As some of you may know, I'm very interested in Anglo-Saxon history and medieval history, are there any sites such as museums, castles, landscapes, etc that could be recommended? Thanks! I will be traveling by myself for roughly 7-10 days, probably by train.
I think Asherman's contribution is right, that there are a lot of things to see but getting around to see even the best things will be difficult. A starting point might be the British Museum, where I am sure you will see plenty of interest. For a medieval city, I think you should visit York, it is theoretically only 2 hours by train from London, and it still has it's basic medieval form, (Cathedral, walls and old narrow streets) well worth seeing. For Anglo-Saxon I would welcome you to visit Jarrow - where I live - which is 8 miles East of Newcastle (but that is another hour by train further north of York), where there are remains of the anglo-saxon church (incorporated into the existing St Pauls church, with ancient window) where St Bede lived and wrote. However it might be easier for you to get to Sutton Hoo, which I have never visited myself but it looks very interesting.

Last edited by fascinating; February 8th, 2018 at 11:28 PM.
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