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Old June 10th, 2018, 01:24 PM   #1

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Angles and England


I'm learning Precalculus right now, specifically Trigonometry. Everything seems based on angles. It makes me wonder why we call them angles.

What is an angle's connection, if any, to the migrating germanic people's who ousted the native Britons and founded Angle-Land?

I know the Saxons were named after the saxe, but what were the Jutes and Angles named after?
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Old June 10th, 2018, 03:51 PM   #2

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The term angle as used in geometry comes for the Latin word for corner. The name of the people who invaded Britain is believed to come from the Germanic word for hook, describing the land near the Jutland peninsula (home of the Jutes) they inhabited. Its' quite possible that both these meanings have the same Latin root.
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Old June 11th, 2018, 08:43 AM   #3

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because they came from Angeln.
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Old June 11th, 2018, 09:04 AM   #4
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An interesting fact: the contemporary High German word for narrow is eng. Just learnt that Old English word is enge and in Dutch this part of UK is called Engeland.
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Old June 11th, 2018, 09:27 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by At Each Kilometer View Post
An interesting fact: the contemporary High German word for narrow is eng. Just learnt that Old English word is enge and in Dutch this part of UK is called Engeland.
And in English that part of the UK is called England.

According to Wikipedia:

Quote:
The name "England" is derived from the Old English name Englaland, which means "land of the Angles".[15] The Angles were one of the Germanic tribes that settled in Great Britain during the Early Middle Ages. The Angles came from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Bay of Kiel area (present-day German state of Schleswig–Holstein) of the Baltic Sea.[16] The earliest recorded use of the term, as "Engla londe", is in the late ninth century translation into Old English of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/England

So Engleland comes from the English word England which comes from Englaland meaning land of the Angles.

Among famous puns about the Angles is the one that Hengist, the legendary first invader of post Roman Britain, was a clever Jute who thought that he knew all the Angles.

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com...all+the+angles

And there is the story that the future pope Gregory I saw some slave boys from England for sale and was told they were pagan Angles from Britain. He said the Angles looked like angels and would be if they were Christians and resolved to someday send a mission to convert the pagan Angles.
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Old June 11th, 2018, 10:21 AM   #6
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There is a debate as to whether Bede got the name from the germanic speakers or from gallo roman sources. The problem, as is often the case with IE roots, is that of who handed it down.

PIE root *ang-/*ank- "to bend"

late 14c., from Old French angle "an angle, a corner" (12c.) and directly from Latin angulus "an angle, a corner," a diminutive form from PIE root *ang-/*ank- "to bend" (source also of Greek ankylos "bent, crooked," Latin ang(u)ere "to compress in a bend, fold, strangle;" Old Church Slavonic aglu "corner;" Lithuanian anka "loop;" Sanskrit ankah "hook, bent," angam "limb;" Old English ancleo "ankle;" Old High German ango "hook").

The Angli "the Angles," literally "people of Angul" (Old Norse Öngull), a region in what is now Holstein, said to be so-called for its hook-like shape.

Tacitus uses the term at a very early date:

"Reudigni deinde et Aviones et Anglii et Varini et Eudoses et Suardones et Nuithones" and my guess is that the Angles in England didn't call themselves Angles until germanic sources after conversion started to use the latin term. It may be similar to the West Saxons who used to call themselves the Gewissae.

Last edited by authun; June 11th, 2018 at 10:23 AM.
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Old June 11th, 2018, 10:33 AM   #7
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@MAGolding 'Non Angli, sed angeli!' The Pope sent Augustine of Canterbury to Britain and the first British king to convert to Christianity was Ethelbert of Kent, before or after the arrival of Augustine, it is unknown, his Frankish wife was pious christian.

Pope Gregory I called Ethelbert, Rex Anglorum. The Jutes and the Saxons settled in what is today Kent during migration period.
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Old June 11th, 2018, 11:40 AM   #8

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And there is the story that the future pope Gregory I saw some slave boys from England for sale and was told they were pagan Angles from Britain. He said the Angles looked like angels and would be if they were Christians and resolved to someday send a mission to convert the pagan Angles.

The full account as told by Bede:


Pope Gregory was visiting the marketplace in Rome when he was struck by the appearance of some fair-skinned and fair-haired foreign slave boys up for sale. On enquiring he was informed that they were heathens from Britain. He asked for the name of their race and was told that they were Angles. "Good", he replied, "they have the face of angels." On being told they came from the kingdom of Deira, he uttered another pun: "De ira", he said, "snatched from the wrath of God." He was then informed their king was called Ælle so he played on the name: "Alleluia! The praise of God the Creator must be sung in in those parts."


Some historians believe it was this religious aspect and association with the Angles which led to the Anglo-Saxons eventually adopting the term English to describe themselves and their language rather than New Saxon or some similar term.
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Old June 12th, 2018, 01:49 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by At Each Kilometer View Post
@MAGolding 'Non Angli, sed angeli!' The Pope sent Augustine of Canterbury to Britain and the first British king to convert to Christianity was Ethelbert of Kent, before or after the arrival of Augustine, it is unknown, his Frankish wife was pious christian.

Pope Gregory I called Ethelbert, Rex Anglorum. The Jutes and the Saxons settled in what is today Kent during migration period.
I need to elaborate on this. In his letter of 598 to Eulogius of Alexandria, Pope Gregory I styled Ethelbert of Kent - Rex Anglorum, and his wife Berta - Regina Anglorum. The point is when his missionaries arrived in Kent, the area was inhabited by the Jutes and they made a little impact outside Kent. Angles were at the time in the north as everyone here knows - East Anglia, Mercia, Bernicia and the mentioned above Deira.
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Old June 12th, 2018, 03:34 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by At Each Kilometer View Post
The point is when his missionaries arrived in Kent, the area was inhabited by the Jutes and they made a little impact outside Kent. Angles were at the time in the north as everyone here knows - East Anglia, Mercia, Bernicia and the mentioned above Deira.
Jutes also settled on the Isle of Wight and in Hampshire. They were neighbours of the Angles on the continent and also used runes.


Click the image to open in full size.


Click the image to open in full size.


Saxon is a gallo roman term used to describe any germanic speaker operating in the north sea area who is not a Frank.
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