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Old November 8th, 2012, 08:14 AM   #121

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ancientgeezer View Post
Now you know very well that the communities were not living in peaceful co-existence before 1974. Some were maybe, but what about the targeted murders of Turkish policemen by EOKA? What about the enclaving of 30,000 Turks? What about the murders of Turkish Cypriots in Famagusta in 1963? What about the Turkish rioting and both sides involving themselves in tit-for-tat revenge? In 1967 Grivas's men were openly attacking the enclaves.
I am not apportioning blame, I've seen the Turks' atrocity photowall in Famagusta and the Greeks' photowall in Paralimni, it just seems to be an intractable problem that is now in the DNA or both sides.
You did not live there and all your information is corrupt and wrong. From prior postings I already know your contempt for Greek people

Last edited by MinoanGoddess; November 8th, 2012 at 08:15 AM. Reason: update
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Old November 8th, 2012, 09:02 AM   #122
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You did not live there and all your information is corrupt and wrong. From prior postings I already know your contempt for Greek people
Prove him wrong then, Yankee. Screaming at people and calling them wrong doesn't make it fact.
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Old November 8th, 2012, 10:00 AM   #123

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Prove him wrong then, Yankee. Screaming at people and calling them wrong doesn't make it fact.
She's actually a Greek Cypriot.

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Originally Posted by MinoanGoddess View Post
You did not live there and all your information is corrupt and wrong. From prior postings I already know your contempt for Greek people
Then you are misreading my posts. I have nothing but contempt for the politicans there though. I was in Cyprus when Denktash (senior) and (was it?) Simitas were meeting over the Annan plan referendum and thought that they looked like two bald men fighting over a comb. I was also there when the Turkish side had a new government that wanted the mainland troops out Greek side killed the plan. As for my earlier post, I could post chapter and verse if you wish--the point was that the communal violence has been going on for so long that a solution seems intractable, just like the jews and the arabs and it doesn't now matter who started it, both sides are fighting ancient battles. If you were a refugee, out of interest what village were you from?
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Old November 9th, 2012, 04:32 AM   #124

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Originally Posted by MinoanGoddess View Post
You did not live there and all your information is corrupt and wrong. From prior postings I already know your contempt for Greek people
"the geezer"'s information seems to be correct. do you deny all that he wrote?
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Old November 9th, 2012, 06:15 AM   #125

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Yes his information is totally wrong, I lived in Famagusta as did my family before 1974 and we lived peacefully with the Turkish community. Near my village Eftakomi in Karpasia which is near Apostolos Andreas there was a Turkish village Galateia and they often visited our village and our families worked together in the fields as they were a farming community. There were also Turkish people who lived in our village of Eftakomi. As a child I had friends from Galateia, and we played together and we were like a family, and we regarded each others in the same way, we did not distinguish Cypriot from Turkish. After the Turkish invasion the borders were open about 8 years ago, I visited Famagusta again and my village Eftakomi. In Famagusta the section by the beach resort Odos Kennedy is closed off, my mom had beachside apartments there. I went to my neighborhood area where my mom had 3 houses in Ayia Ekaterini. To one of our houses I was welcomed with my sister, the people rennovated our house as they were from Australia of Turkish descent. They made us welcome and we had snacks and drinks and we talked. They said they had no deed to the land or house as it is not allowed. Across the street from our house I started talking to a Turkish woman from England and she started crying telling me that her brother who was Turkish Cyprian and lived in the area was devastated by what happened to us: the separation as we lived peacefully and loved each other. Me and my sister wanted to visit the home where we grew up on the first floor, however these residents were destructive. The broke the walls to my home and made a hole adjoining the house with our storefront. The local Turkish residents pleaded with these people to let us into our home and they refused. The Turkish residents said they did not like these people as they were "kleftes" known for stealing around the neighborhood and they looked down upon them. We were able to look at the second floor of the house as it was rented to a businessman who was hospitable to us and showed us around.
The third house was closed off, seemed deserted, no one lived in it and local residents did not know anything about it.
Then we went off to Etakomi. I went by the church which was turned to a Mosque. Across the church was an elementary school. I started talking to the Turkish teacher in English and told him we came to look at our homes in our village. By the church was a Turkish Cypriot man in his 80s and he spoke Greek and Turkish and he lived there many years and remembers my grandparents and other family members and remembered all the good times together. When all the Turkish residents in my village were told about us by this Turkish Cyprian man the entire village and children all came to us... to welcome us and especially the kids there were very excited. The residents showed us around our homes then also welcomed us to their homes and gave us food and drinks, showed us photos and we talked.
From this story, do you feel that we cannot live together as people and that we do not like each other? We co-existed peacefully before and we co-exist and get along just fine even after the war. People are people. No one should have any hate in their hearts.
As for his other information about mass killings it is totally wrong...how did they mass murder 30,000 with macheties or shotguns...that is a laugh....just remember the denial of the annihilation of the Armenians...is that just a fabrication since it has been discarded by the Turkish government? When you talk facts you better be pretty darn sure they are correct as one who did not live there in those times did not experience what happened, should not be telling tall tales.
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Old November 9th, 2012, 06:37 AM   #126

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From what I understand of it, Cyprus was at one time a united island. However, due to discrimination between the minority in power (Greek Cypriots) and majority not in positions of power (Turkish Cypriots) a war broke out.
No, the Greeks were the majority and the Turks have been settling people in the north to bulster the Turkish minority.

The Greek Cypriots wanted to join Greece and the Turks of Turkey wanted no part in that. Also Turkey (rationally) didn't want an extension of Greece to their south.

I say let Greek Cyprus go to Greece and Turkish Cyprus go to Turkey.
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Old November 9th, 2012, 06:52 AM   #127

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Originally Posted by MinoanGoddess View Post
Yes his information is totally wrong, I lived in Famagusta as did my family before 1974 and we lived peacefully with the Turkish community. Near my village Eftakomi in Karpasia which is near Apostolos Andreas there was a Turkish village Galateia and they often visited our village and our families worked together in the fields as they were a farming community. There were also Turkish people who lived in our village of Eftakomi. As a child I had friends from Galateia, and we played together and we were like a family, and we regarded each others in the same way, we did not distinguish Cypriot from Turkish. After the Turkish invasion the borders were open about 8 years ago, I visited Famagusta again and my village Eftakomi. In Famagusta the section by the beach resort Odos Kennedy is closed off, my mom had beachside apartments there. I went to my neighborhood area where my mom had 3 houses in Ayia Ekaterini. To one of our houses I was welcomed with my sister, the people rennovated our house as they were from Australia of Turkish descent. They made us welcome and we had snacks and drinks and we talked. They said they had no deed to the land or house as it is not allowed. Across the street from our house I started talking to a Turkish woman from England and she started crying telling me that her brother who was Turkish Cyprian and lived in the area was devastated by what happened to us: the separation as we lived peacefully and loved each other. Me and my sister wanted to visit the home where we grew up on the first floor, however these residents were destructive. The broke the walls to my home and made a hole adjoining the house with our storefront. The local Turkish residents pleaded with these people to let us into our home and they refused. The Turkish residents said they did not like these people as they were "kleftes" known for stealing around the neighborhood and they looked down upon them. We were able to look at the second floor of the house as it was rented to a businessman who was hospitable to us and showed us around.
The third house was closed off, seemed deserted, no one lived in it and local residents did not know anything about it.
Then we went off to Etakomi. I went by the church which was turned to a Mosque. Across the church was an elementary school. I started talking to the Turkish teacher in English and told him we came to look at our homes in our village. By the church was a Turkish Cypriot man in his 80s and he spoke Greek and Turkish and he lived there many years and remembers my grandparents and other family members and remembered all the good times together. When all the Turkish residents in my village were told about us by this Turkish Cyprian man the entire village and children all came to us... to welcome us and especially the kids there were very excited. The residents showed us around our homes then also welcomed us to their homes and gave us food and drinks, showed us photos and we talked.
From this story, do you feel that we cannot live together as people and that we do not like each other? We co-existed peacefully before and we co-exist and get along just fine even after the war. People are people. No one should have any hate in their hearts.
As for his other information about mass killings it is totally wrong...how did they mass murder 30,000 with macheties or shotguns...that is a laugh....just remember the denial of the annihilation of the Armenians...is that just a fabrication since it has been discarded by the Turkish government? When you talk facts you better be pretty darn sure they are correct as one who did not live there in those times did not experience what happened, should not be telling tall tales.
That a moving story and perhaps some Cypriots can get along. But it hardly changes the accuracy of what I posted. I mentioned that 30,000 turks were enclaved that doesn't mean massacre, it means to confine to closed areas. The casualties were 360+ Turks and 174 Greeks. As you are from Famagusta you may, if you are old enough, remember Bloody Christmas in 1963 when 25 Turks were killed and the attacks the same month in Kofinou. . You denied (violently) that EOKA operated in the 1950s, but it did and its main action was between 1953 and 1960 when they murdered 148 Greeks, 105 British soldiers, 21 Policemen and 55 Turkish civilians. TMT in turn murdered 60 Greeks. EOKA in 1974 only operated for a few months as Grivas, at 75, was past his sell by date and dropped dead. It was the EOKA men in the National Guard that tried to overthrow Makarios.
But its great if you an forget all that and just agree to re-union.
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Old November 9th, 2012, 07:52 AM   #128

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinoanGoddess View Post
Yes his information is totally wrong, I lived in Famagusta as did my family before 1974 and we lived peacefully with the Turkish community. Near my village Eftakomi in Karpasia which is near Apostolos Andreas there was a Turkish village Galateia and they often visited our village and our families worked together in the fields as they were a farming community. There were also Turkish people who lived in our village of Eftakomi. As a child I had friends from Galateia, and we played together and we were like a family, and we regarded each others in the same way, we did not distinguish Cypriot from Turkish. After the Turkish invasion the borders were open about 8 years ago, I visited Famagusta again and my village Eftakomi. In Famagusta the section by the beach resort Odos Kennedy is closed off, my mom had beachside apartments there. I went to my neighborhood area where my mom had 3 houses in Ayia Ekaterini. To one of our houses I was welcomed with my sister, the people rennovated our house as they were from Australia of Turkish descent. They made us welcome and we had snacks and drinks and we talked. They said they had no deed to the land or house as it is not allowed. Across the street from our house I started talking to a Turkish woman from England and she started crying telling me that her brother who was Turkish Cyprian and lived in the area was devastated by what happened to us: the separation as we lived peacefully and loved each other. Me and my sister wanted to visit the home where we grew up on the first floor, however these residents were destructive. The broke the walls to my home and made a hole adjoining the house with our storefront. The local Turkish residents pleaded with these people to let us into our home and they refused. The Turkish residents said they did not like these people as they were "kleftes" known for stealing around the neighborhood and they looked down upon them. We were able to look at the second floor of the house as it was rented to a businessman who was hospitable to us and showed us around.
The third house was closed off, seemed deserted, no one lived in it and local residents did not know anything about it.
Then we went off to Etakomi. I went by the church which was turned to a Mosque. Across the church was an elementary school. I started talking to the Turkish teacher in English and told him we came to look at our homes in our village. By the church was a Turkish Cypriot man in his 80s and he spoke Greek and Turkish and he lived there many years and remembers my grandparents and other family members and remembered all the good times together. When all the Turkish residents in my village were told about us by this Turkish Cyprian man the entire village and children all came to us... to welcome us and especially the kids there were very excited. The residents showed us around our homes then also welcomed us to their homes and gave us food and drinks, showed us photos and we talked.
From this story, do you feel that we cannot live together as people and that we do not like each other? We co-existed peacefully before and we co-exist and get along just fine even after the war. People are people. No one should have any hate in their hearts.
As for his other information about mass killings it is totally wrong...how did they mass murder 30,000 with macheties or shotguns...that is a laugh....just remember the denial of the annihilation of the Armenians...is that just a fabrication since it has been discarded by the Turkish government? When you talk facts you better be pretty darn sure they are correct as one who did not live there in those times did not experience what happened, should not be telling tall tales.
it's a moving story but doesn't change the history about what happened to turkish cypriots in and before 1974. also Ancientgeezer said those 30.000 people were enclaved not killed. he was just stating the facts about what happened and you happen to deny all that and blame him for having contempt.
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Old November 9th, 2012, 08:10 AM   #129

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the plural of anecdote?
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Old November 9th, 2012, 02:00 PM   #130

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Maratha, Santalaris and Aloda massacre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
29 of the victims were primery school children in the age of 8-10.
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