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Old January 16th, 2013, 06:39 AM   #101

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Originally Posted by Glowin View Post
Then, in your opinion, what is the difference between Serbs, Montenegrins, Croats, Bosniaks etc? You know, the REAL difference...

I've lived in Zagreb and Belgrade, and I didn't see much difference... if any at all.

Have you actually been to any other Yugoslav state? I don't think that anyone who has been can claim that there is a huge difference between a Zagreb-native and Podgorica-native ( apart from the accent )

Imo, they are all the same... Not Serbs, but South Slavs. You can call them all Croats for I care... The name doesn't change what (or who) you are.


Yes, I have been to almost all states of former yugoslavia, and as you sad, they are quite similar, but that is because Croats during their migration came to contact with Slavic tribes and their culture, and through interaction with the Slavs, old Croats were assimilated in to the Slavic culture. There are only few things that connect modern day Croats with the original Iranian tribe (the only thing I can think of is the name Hrvat).
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Old January 16th, 2013, 07:40 AM   #102
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Well Serbs use Cyrillic and Croats use Latin (mainly). If you consider them same language than Serbo-Croat use both Cyrillic and Latin.

In fact Croat used (may be still use) also Glagolic/Cyrillic script and Serbs use Latin scrip. But that is just side note.
To be a bit more precise Croats don't use Glagolic (Glagoljica) script any more at all. In fact it began to disappear from use some 500 years ago, aldough it was rarely used in remote inland areas by lower clergy up until early 17 th century.
Glagolic script wasn't that widespread among the Croat people and was used mainly inland exclusively by monks and lower clergy and it did indeed contained a few cyrillic caracters.
On the other hand in croatian coastal towns due to their coplete romanization Latin script was always in exclusive use.
As for Cyrillic script as such, it was never used by Croats.

Last edited by El Chupakabra; January 16th, 2013 at 07:52 AM.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 08:00 AM   #103

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But can the 'average' Croat read and understand Cyrillic, or not?
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Old January 16th, 2013, 08:18 AM   #104

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But can the 'average' Croat read and understand Cyrillic, or not?

Learning Cyrillic was compulsory in Yugoslavia, so a lot of Croats do know it, but after the disintegration it is no longer thought in schools, so most of the younger people don't understand it.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 08:22 AM   #105

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Learning Cyrillic was compulsory in Yugoslavia, so a lot of Croats do know it, but after the disintegration it is no longer thought in schools, so most of the younger people don't understand it.
Thank you.

I think, if I was Croatian, I'd want to understand it. In case I found some sort of contraption in the garage and all the instructions or warning labels were in Cyrillic

But then, I've grown up on the border with Wales and the only efforts to learn Welsh I've ever made was in translating song titles and lyrics. And I didn't get very far with that.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 09:41 AM   #106

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To be completly honest, there is no big difference between cyrillic and latin script in Serbo-Croatian. Even without learning in school each, by knowing one, and using your intelligence, you could figure out the other in less than 10 minutes.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 10:02 AM   #107

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I would disagree. It may be is not for Serbs who are for long time used to Latin along Cyrillic but learning Cyrillic for Latin user is not as easy (speaking from my own experience). One problem is that while many letters are similar or same, they sometimes mean something different.

And for Romance or Germanic speakers matter is even more difficult because Slavic alphabets tend to have number of letters which Western alphabets do not.

To be sure it is way more easier than learning Arabic or Chinese scripts of course.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 12:41 PM   #108
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Originally Posted by astafjevs View Post
But can the 'average' Croat read and understand Cyrillic, or not?
As Cyrillic script was mandatory for all in schools during first and second Yugoslavia (roughly from 1918 to 1990) it is safe to asume that Croats who had attended school during that time are at least familiar with the subject.
Although Cyrillic script was taught in schools during that time it was not an official script, nor it was officialy used in Croatia, Slovenia and Bosnia & Herzegovina while those were part of post WWII Yugoslavia.
As for younger generation of Croats they most certainly do not know the Cyrillic script because it was, as foreign, unnecesary script, no longer (since 1990) taught in schools.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 12:48 PM   #109

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Thank you, goat sucker
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Old January 16th, 2013, 04:51 PM   #110

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I would disagree. It may be is not for Serbs who are for long time used to Latin along Cyrillic but learning Cyrillic for Latin user is not as easy (speaking from my own experience). One problem is that while many letters are similar or same, they sometimes mean something different.

.
At college I had four semesters of Russian, and just like you pointed out some of those consonant switches from Latin to Cyrillic were annoying to say the least. Latin "R" represented as "P" was fine since from mathematics the pi character was familar, so easier to assign "P" to another consonant sound. But Latin "N" written "H"... was a source of spelling errors for most of two semesters.

Keeping the double vowels (soft or short pronunciation) gave many students a hard time too. Fortunately in my case I grew up hearing Serbo-Croat and Polish spoken by older generations and I caught onto the purpose of the double vowels.
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