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Old November 24th, 2012, 01:04 PM   #31

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Federation of states that share the same cultural, historical and economic past. Federation of states that haven't waged war among themselves (well Bulgaria is pacified nowadays, but Greece and Serbia never warred, as well as Serbia and Romania).
Those states might not be tied in lingua like Yugoslavia was (tho Serbian and Bulgarian are fairly similar), but everything else is like in, or better than Yugoslavia.
Also it would create a big market, have exit on multiple seas, great geo-strategic value, and lots of MPs if they would be in EU
Also, the most important, language and ethnicity aside, the state would culturally be pretty homogenous being built upon Byzantine cultural tradition.

As for Thessaloniki... I can go on and on about various historical reasons for it being honorary capital, but it all comes down to... it's my personal favourite
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Old November 24th, 2012, 01:11 PM   #32
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Federation of states that share the same cultural, historical and economic past. Federation of states that haven't waged war among themselves (well Bulgaria is pacified nowadays, but Greece and Serbia never warred, as well as Serbia and Romania).
Those states might not be tied in lingua like Yugoslavia was (tho Serbian and Bulgarian are fairly similar), but everything else is like in, or better than Yugoslavia.
Also it would create a big market, have exit on multiple seas, great geo-strategic value, and lots of MPs if they would be in EU
Also, the most important, language and ethnicity aside, the state would culturally be pretty homogenous being built upon Byzantine cultural tradition.

As for Thessaloniki... I can go on and on about various historical reasons for it being honorary capital, but it all comes down to... it's my personal favourite
What do you mean by "Byzantine cultural tradition", excepting religion?
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Old November 24th, 2012, 01:19 PM   #33

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Rituals and rites, the architecture, script, music, mentality... All similar.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 01:29 PM   #34
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Rituals and rites, the architecture, script, music, mentality... All similar.
The beauty of all-encompassing religion! I think you make part from a certain category of deep religious thinkers, but one who, in opposition with the most from the same category, simply forgot that the second Rome was made practically obsolete by the third.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 01:38 PM   #35

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I am not sure what you just said there
I meant rites and rituals in non - religious sense of course. It would be easy to make that connection religious-wise. Also, symbolism and how the symbols work is similar in these Balkan states.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 01:45 PM   #36
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I am not sure what you just said there
I meant rites and rituals in non - religious sense of course. It would be easy to make that connection religious-wise. Also, symbolism and how the symbols work is similar in these Balkan states.
Can you be more specific? To what symbols do you refer and how those symbols work?
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Old November 24th, 2012, 01:53 PM   #37

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Let me answer you with a question. It may give you the answer.
Have you ever been to Serbia, Bulgaria and / or Greece? And how do you feel when you are there compared to when you are in other countries like Ukraine or Hungary?
I feel at home. The same can be said of Croatia of course or Slovenia, but I can't say the same about Hungary or Spain or some other country.

Read a little bit of David I. Kertzer on that subject. He has great texts on rites, rituals and symoblism in modern day life and politics. He will make it much more clear than I could
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Old November 24th, 2012, 02:12 PM   #38
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Let me answer you with a question. It may give you the answer.
Have you ever been to Serbia, Bulgaria and / or Greece? And how do you feel when you are there compared to when you are in other countries like Ukraine or Hungary?
I feel at home. The same can be said of Croatia of course or Slovenia, but I can't say the same about Hungary or Spain or some other country.

Read a little bit of David I. Kertzer on that subject. He has great texts on rites, rituals and symoblism in modern day life and politics. He will make it much more clear than I could
No, but I went in Istanbul, and walked for almost seven hours in Phanar. Did you visit Romania? She has influences from all the sides. Re: Byzantine, I recommend you to read "Byzantium after Byzantium" by the important Romanian historian Nicolae Iorga
Nicolae_Iorga Nicolae_Iorga
, if you know some French, it is available here: BYZANCE APRES BYZANCE, N. IORGA. I am almost sure that you would enjoy such a reading.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 02:24 PM   #39

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Well best friend is part Romanian, but other than that, no I have no ties to Romania. Unfortunately never been there, but hopefully that will soon change.
My French is non-existent :P Never liked the language. But I will see if I can find something about him and the book in English.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 02:48 PM   #40
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Well best friend is part Romanian, but other than that, no I have no ties to Romania. Unfortunately never been there, but hopefully that will soon change.
My French is non-existent :P Never liked the language. But I will see if I can find something about him and the book in English.
Well, neither I like too much how French sounds, but culturally speaking it had an important role. Unfortunately I can provide you only with the Amazon link to an English translation:

Amazon.com: Byzantium After Byzantium (9789739432092): Nicolae Iorga, Nicolas Lorga, Laura Treptow: Books
Amazon.com: Byzantium After Byzantium (9789739432092): Nicolae Iorga, Nicolas Lorga, Laura Treptow: Books

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