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Old October 16th, 2011, 06:26 PM   #1
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El-Cid


Did El-Cid remove the Moors back to Africa rather then the Christians??


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Old October 16th, 2011, 06:28 PM   #2

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Remove?

What do you mean exactly?
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Old October 16th, 2011, 06:30 PM   #3

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Did he drive the Moors out of Spain? No that wasn't achieved until 1492.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 06:49 PM   #4

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Did El-Cid remove the Moors back to Africa rather then the Christians??


El Cid

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The real Cid was a sort of mercenary who did not refrain from forming alliances with the moors against christians or with christians against the moors. And notwithstanding this, he tried to remain as independent from both side as possible, and he was certainly not the model subject shown in the film. It seems that, however, at the end of his career, he was caught by the general enthousiasm for the reconquista that was rising, but he only became a legend after his death.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 06:57 PM   #5
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The real Cid was a sort of mercenary who did not refrain from forming alliances with the moors against christians or with christians against the moors. And notwithstanding this, he tried to remain as independent from both side as possible, and he was certainly not the model subject shown in the film. It seems that, however, at the end of his career, he was caught by the general enthousiasm for the reconquista that was rising, but he only became a legend after his death.
Thank you. I know little of him and the Moors but am interested why they they had a such a tremendous lifestyle among both the Jews and Arab prior to Christianity.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 07:11 PM   #6

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I'm afraid that I don't understand what you mean by "prior to christianity", since christianity was present in Spain centuries before Islam even appeared in Arabia.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 09:16 PM   #7
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Remove?

What do you mean exactly?
I am not sure precisely but I am thinking of the periods that marched down the El Camino del Cid to Valencia and then down to Elche.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 09:25 PM   #8
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I'm afraid that I don't understand what you mean by "prior to christianity", since christianity was present in Spain centuries before Islam even appeared in Arabia.
The Moor's arrived in Spain in 711 from Northern Africa and were finally driven out in 1492 by Ferdinand and Isabella. This was a good part of the Papacies' Inquisition that drove the Jews to as far as Russia and the Northern and Western Moors into Slavery either as slave traders or slaves to go to the Americas.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 09:29 PM   #9

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The Moor's arrived in Spain in 711 from Northern Africa and were finally driven out in 1492 by Ferdinand and Isabella. This was a good part of the Papacies' Inquisition that drove the Jews to as far as Russia and the Northern and Western Moors into Slavery either as slave traders or slaves to go to the Americas.
- It is false. The moors whad already lost 85 % of spain by the 1260s, only the last kingdom of Grenada fell in 1492.

- The jews had already been expelled from muslim spain in the late 11th century, and they had fled in christian territories in the north. They lived there unharmed and well-treated until the 14th century. Then, they started to be targetted by mobs, but not by the rulers who protected them (though with increasing discrimination).

- The jews were NOT expelled by the papal inquisition but by the spanish inquisition, which was completely controlled by the rulers of Spain. The pope had no control whatsoever on the spanish inquisition since he had given it to the kings of spain. Moreover, the pope Alexander VI in fact welcomed the jews that had been expelled from Spain in the papal states.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 10:13 PM   #10
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- It is false. The moors whad already lost 85 % of spain by the 1260s, only the last kingdom of Grenada fell in 1492.

- The jews had already been expelled from muslim spain in the late 11th century, and they had fled in christian territories in the north. They lived there unharmed and well-treated until the 14th century. Then, they started to be targetted by mobs, but not by the rulers who protected them (though with increasing discrimination).

- The jews were NOT expelled by the papal inquisition but by the spanish inquisition, which was completely controlled by the rulers of Spain. The pope had no control whatsoever on the spanish inquisition since he had given it to the kings of spain. Moreover, the pope Alexander VI in fact welcomed the jews that had been expelled from Spain in the papal states.
See:

El Cid

The Inquisitions were the same. the pope ruled both Ferdinand and Isabella and was concerned that others were encroaching on the papacy and the doctrine's of the religions. The battle for the command of christianity was underway from the Great Schism of Christianity in 1378 to the Ana-baptists and on to Luther in 1517. The inquisitions were also held in Spain and other fiefdoms but the Jews and Moors were decimated even from the corrupt Alexander VI.

Martin Luther was shocked by the corruption of the clergy on a trip to Rome in 1510. Sixtus IV (1471–1484) established the practice of selling indulgences to be applied to the dead, thereby establishing a new stream of revenue with agents across Europe.[7] Pope Alexander VI (1492–1503) was one of the most controversial of the Renaissance Popes. He fathered seven children, including Lucrezia and Cesare Borgia, by at least two mistresses.[8] Fourteen years after his death, the corruption of the papacy that Pope Alexander VI exemplified—particularly the sale of indulgences—prompted Luther to write the The Ninety-Five Theses, which he nailed to the door of a church at Wittenberg in Saxony.

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