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Old October 17th, 2011, 08:19 AM   #1

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Marie Antoinette


My brother-in-law was lamenting the 16th of October, and knowing what I know of him, I asked, "Why, because some Austrian chick got her head lopped off?"

His response was, "You could say that. I say she was used as a symbol for propaganda against the monarchy and was murdered."

True, she probably didn't deserve what she got, but was she truly an innocent tool that was just lumped in with all of the other, 'upwardly mobile persons'?
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Old October 17th, 2011, 08:36 AM   #2

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Being smug, distant and aloof is part of being a king or queen.
Thomas Jefferson even didn't like her, but for all her alleged faults
that was no reason to give her the National Razor.
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Old October 17th, 2011, 08:54 AM   #3

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She is given a bad press and was demonised at the time mainly because she was Austrian.

While not a 'great' Queen by the standards of the day she was not a bad one either.

Who does deserve sympathy is her son and the shameful way the revolutionaires treated him.
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Old October 17th, 2011, 09:57 AM   #4

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She definately did nothing to earn a spot on the scaffold. She was hated because she was Austrian and perceived as uncaring, but she never did anything to harm France or her people.
The revolutionaries were over zealous to put it lightly, the razor's count can attest to that, along with how many of their own they eventually sent to meet it.
Along with Marie and many others, two standouts in particular just for being associated with royalty:
[ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_de_Lamballe"]Princess Marie Louise of Savoy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

Princess Élisabeth of France - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old October 17th, 2011, 11:06 AM   #5

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There's no doubt she lived in something of a bubble in her early years. But considering the fact that she was criticized as "improper" when she wore a plain muslin gown to show that she was trying to conserve money, I'd say she was definitely in a "damned if you do, damned if you don't" situation. She could do no right; they just wanted someone to blame. If she cared for and tried to help the poor, it was "improper" of a queen, but if she didn't, she was the fault of everything.
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Old October 17th, 2011, 11:20 AM   #6

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Quote:
Originally Posted by History Chick View Post
There's no doubt she lived in something of a bubble in her early years. But considering the fact that she was criticized as "improper" when she wore a plain muslin gown to show that she was trying to conserve money, I'd say she was definitely in a "damned if you do, damned if you don't" situation. She could do no right; they just wanted someone to blame. If she cared for and tried to help the poor, it was "improper" of a queen, but if she didn't, she was the fault of everything.
There was also an Austrian feel to it, something about not looking "French" enough, as the muslin had a farm-ish look to it and offended some of the nobility...she still sparked a trend none-the-less, but the painting was redone:
Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.
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Old October 17th, 2011, 11:28 AM   #7

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiki19 View Post
She definately did nothing to earn a spot on the scaffold. She was hated because she was Austrian and perceived as uncaring, but she never did anything to harm France or her people.
The revolutionaries were over zealous to put it lightly, the razor's count can attest to that, along with how many of their own they eventually sent to meet it.
Along with Marie and many others, two standouts in particular just for being associated with royalty:
Princess Marie Louise of Savoy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Princess Élisabeth of France - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
exactly, i've always felt very sorry for her and louis and the way their children were treated. she may have been a big spender but everything i have read about her said she had a kind heart and never harmed anyone (on purpose). beheading her was a crime and the people who tortured her son deserved the same fate! and it still irks me that people still believe that she said "let them eat cake"!
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Old October 17th, 2011, 01:11 PM   #8

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Quote:
Originally Posted by okamido View Post
My brother-in-law was lamenting the 16th of October, and knowing what I know of him, I asked, "Why, because some Austrian chick got her head lopped off?"

His response was, "You could say that. I say she was used as a symbol for propaganda against the monarchy and was murdered."

True, she probably didn't deserve what she got, but was she truly an innocent tool that was just lumped in with all of the other, 'upwardly mobile persons'?
As she was Queen of France, I don't really see how she could be upwardly mobile. She could not have gone any further upward.

She was accused of squandering France's wealth, which was nonsense. Spending by the royal family accounted for only a tiny fraction of state expenditure, and she was not particularly extravagant.

She had however been in correspondence with Austria, and she did want to help Austria defeat France.So she was guilt of treason against the revolutionary government. But they didn 't have the evidence, so had to fall back on the old accusations about her wasting money.
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Old October 17th, 2011, 01:13 PM   #9

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Originally Posted by tjadams View Post
Being smug, distant and aloof is part of being a king or queen.
Thomas Jefferson even didn't like her, but for all her alleged faults
that was no reason to give her the National Razor.
She wasn't smug, distant and aloof. She was a very charming woman, and very kind. She cared more about the poor than most aristocrats did.
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Old October 17th, 2011, 02:51 PM   #10

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I have no love or admiration for any monarchy, living or past, they are just
mere people ; I even have a huge spot of sympathy carved out for
Queen Antionette & how unjustly she and her family were treated by the
revolution. She and her family were made scapegoats,
But-
""My tastes are not the same as the King's, who is only interested in hunting and his metal-working," the queen wrote to a friend in April 1775. And what exorbitant tastes she had!
She bought a pair of diamond bracelets that cost as much as a Paris mansion. She sported towering bouffant hairdos, including the "inoculation pouf," a forbidding confection that
featured a club striking a snake in an olive tree (representing the triumph of science over evil) to celebrate her success in persuading the king to be vaccinated against smallpox..."
"Cloistered in the luxury of Versailles, the royal couple was oblivious to their subjects' plight. A failed harvest had made the price of grain skyrocket, and mobs were rioting in
the streets of Paris, demanding cheap bread. Crushing taxes were also taking their toll on the populace. Meanwhile, the queen gambled recklessly, ordered expensive jewelry and
clothes and spent a fortune on creating her own private domain at Versailles—the Petit Trianon. The three-story neo-Classical château was originally built on the grounds of
Versailles in 1762-68 by Louis XV for his mistress Madame de Pompadour. Louis XVI had given it to Marie Antoinette in June 1774, a few days after he became king,
when she asked for a hideaway.
("This pleasure house is yours," he told her.) "She wanted a domain reserved for her intimate circle of friends," says Baulez, as we tour the Trianon..."
"..But Marie Antoinette seemed blind to the criticism. She directed architect Richard Mique and artist Hubert Robert to conjure up a sylvan fantasy of artificial streams,
grottoes and winding paths. (During nighttime galas, a Temple of Love rotunda and a glass music salon were illuminated by wood fires hidden in trenches in the ground.)
In 1784, the two designers created what, from the outside, appeared to be a hamlet (the Hameau) of cracked and tumbledown cottages, which, in fact, were appointed
with comfortable couches, stoves and billiard tables. A working farm completed what Zweig satirized as "this expensive pastoral comedy,.."She loved ornamentation," says Baulez.
"She wasn't interested in dignity, but the picturesque."
Marie Antoinette | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine
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