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Old November 23rd, 2011, 08:05 PM   #11

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Originally Posted by annelouise17 View Post
When it come to soccor the English are not Great Britian!
There is no such thing as soccer in England or Great Britain. It's football!
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Old November 24th, 2011, 03:02 AM   #12
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....Norn Iron........
You are to be commended on the accuracy of your pronunciation/phonetic skills.

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I've done some work in the south around Tip and Cork but haven't ventured north yet.
To be perfectly honest, and while there are some nice bits, unless you have a particular interest in something, a reason to visit, or time on your hands and a dose of wanderlust, you're not missing all that much.

Please note this modesty is not a disingenuous ploy to prevent the place from being overrun by tourists, though comparative lack of same is, arguably, a positive thing in some ways.

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Top Guinness too!
Unfortunately, we can't claim credit for that one.

Last edited by archibald; November 24th, 2011 at 03:09 AM.
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Old November 24th, 2011, 03:07 AM   #13

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I used to go to Northern Ireland,Omagh via Belfast a lot in my teens due to my mum having come from there and i have a lot of cousins and an uncle/aunt there.
It was certainly an experience as this was during the 80's and the days of the army/IRA/bombs and barbed wire filled the streets of Belfast.
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Old November 24th, 2011, 03:10 AM   #14

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AND walking down the falls road in Belfast was an experience as well !!
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Old November 24th, 2011, 03:15 AM   #15
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The Scot-Irish or Ulster -Scot settle in the Moutians of Kentucky, they created Bluegrass music. So its a culture link to your past. It has more in common with what Southern Irish call Celtic, just add bandjos and steal guitars. After all the Scotts are considered Celts. The Scots and Ulster had similar cultures, just different religions.
This is true, and as Kevin will know, in terms of his rugby fan status and his Welsh background, there is a Celtic League involving Scotch, Welsh and Irish (north and south) teams. The only region from the British Isles not represented is England, though I believe Cornwall and Devon could in theory qualify (and possibly parts of Northeast England? I am not sure). :]

Generally speaking, the word 'Celtic' is often associated locally (inaccurately, as you say) with Southern Irish/Nationalist culture only.

We have not hitherto tended to emphasize our common heritages.
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Old November 24th, 2011, 05:25 AM   #16
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I used to go to Northern Ireland,Omagh via Belfast a lot in my teens due to my mum having come from there and i have a lot of cousins and an uncle/aunt there.
It was certainly an experience as this was during the 80's and the days of the army/IRA/bombs and barbed wire filled the streets of Belfast.
Ah yes. Those were the days.

Queuing up at the barriers in Royal Avenue in the 1970's to get body-frisked just to go shopping in the city centre, and hoping (as a teenage boy willing to extract the maximum possible eroticism out of every situation) to get briefly rummaged over by an attractive older woman in uniform. But it never panned out.

And having to evacuate the area for bomb scares so routine that women, laden down with plastic shopping bags, would be seen impatiently waiting behind the hazard tape, looking at their watches and asking a policeman was it not safe enough yet to go back in, apparently more concerned with getting the shopping finished than with the risk of ending up being shovelled into a body bag.

A not entirely unrealistic risk. I first left home to go to school (boarding school) in Belfast in September 1972, just a matter of weeks after Bloody Friday. What on earth were my parents thinking? :]

'Bloody Friday is the name given to the bombings by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) in Belfast on 21 July 1972. Twenty-two bombs exploded in the space of eighty minutes, killing nine people (including two British soldiers) and injuring 130.

The bombings were part of a concerted bombing campaign carried out by the IRA against economic, military and political targets in Northern Ireland. It carried out a total of 1,300 bombings in 1972, following the failure of secret talks with the British government in London.

A total of 22 bombs were planted and, in the resulting explosions, nine people were killed and a further 130 civilians injured, many horrifically mutilated. Of the 130 people injured, 77 were women and children. The IRA gave warnings to the security forces via the local media before the bombs exploded—with 30 minutes' warning given for the first bomb and about 70 minutes' warning given for the last bomb. The IRA chief of staff, Seán Mac Stíofáin, claimed that the warnings for the two bombs that claimed lives were deliberately disregarded by the British for strategic policy reasons.

Along with some accurate warnings given by the IRA, two more hoax warnings were called in, which impeded the evacuation of the area. The Royal Ulster Constabulary and British Army only effectively cleared a small number of areas before the bombs went off. In addition, because of the large number of bombs in the confined area of Belfast city centre, people evacuated from the site of one bomb were accidentally moved into the vicinity of other bombs.'


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloody_Friday_(1972)

To be fair (to my parents), they obtained a huge discount on school fees (due to difficulties in filling bedspaces at the school) and I got a better education than they could ever have hoped to afford otherwize. So, in a way, I have to thank the terrorists for that. Cheers, lads, not least for giving warnings ahead of bombs in many cases.

Last edited by archibald; November 24th, 2011 at 06:07 AM.
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Old November 24th, 2011, 06:43 AM   #17

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Belfast on a Quiet Sunday affermoon>PA180141.jpg Sorry I do need to go in my files and rotate mhy pictures.

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Old November 24th, 2011, 06:48 AM   #18

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PA180144.jpg
Another picture from Belfast
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Old November 24th, 2011, 08:06 AM   #19
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Belfast on a Quiet Sunday affermoon>Attachment 2759 Sorry I do need to go in my files and rotate mhy pictures.
In case you're interested, the building just visible on the right, with the white upper walls, is a pub in which I sometimes watch footie (soccer) on a big screen on a Sunday afternoon. :]

This photo is slightly out of date, but only by a few years. Beyond the pub there is now, instead of an old cinema (where I once got pissed on vodka, aged 16, while watching the film, 'Tommy') a nice new block of flats. Though none are sold, them having been built just before the economic downturn and property crash.

For those more interested in history/politics, this photo is of part of the Ormeau Road. Like a lot of long arterial routes in the city, it passes, at various points, through areas which are mainly Protestant, mainly Catholic, and also mixed areas. It is one of the Orange Order's 'Traditional Routes' and there are still some unresolved issues about parades, which surface annually, at one particular flashpoint near the bridge over the River Lagan, during the 'Glorious Twelfth' (of July) 'celebrations'.

This from just last year:

http://news.sky.com/home/uk-news/article/15664041

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

I personally do not have a lot of time for Orangeism, which is, IMO, a bit of an outdated blight on the country, so I sympathize with the protesters, even though they are, broadly speaking, Nationalists who may well want me to lose my British citizenship.

You see, from a stereotypical Unionist perspective, there is often 'the bigger agenda' lurking below the surface. The protests are not really about the inconvenience or offense caused by the parades, though this is true in part, and sufficient, IMO, to warrant a protest.

The 'Protestant' reaction to the Civil Rights movement in the late 1960's can be viewed in a similar light, with Unionists overreacting because of a perceived underlying threat to their status, literally, that is, to the state. There is a way, I'm not suggesting it is the best or only way, of understanding (while not necessarily condoning) Northern Irish Protestant discrimination towards Catholics (which I believe was common, though maybe not as endemic as sometimes described, before the 'Troubles'), and that is in terms of a very ingrained insecurity, fear, and perhaps most of all, mistrust (almost as much of the mainland British in London as anything else) the sort one commonly finds in slightly vulnerable outposts, and not entirely unfounded. Plus some common or garden religious bigotry, of course.

Last edited by archibald; November 24th, 2011 at 08:56 AM.
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Old November 24th, 2011, 08:15 AM   #20

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This is true, and as Kevin will know, in terms of his rugby fan status and his Welsh background, there is a Celtic League involving Scotch, Welsh and Irish (north and south) teams. The only region from the British Isles not represented is England, though I believe Cornwall and Devon could in theory qualify (and possibly parts of Northeast England? I am not sure). :]

Generally speaking, the word 'Celtic' is often associated locally (inaccurately, as you say) with Southern Irish/Nationalist culture only.

We have not hitherto tended to emphasize our common heritages.
The Irish Rebel songs and Christy Moore. "Sweet Molly Malone" Anglo Irish.
John Fields a classical Irish Composer.
This is the music I think of as Southern Irish.
"When Irish Eyes are Smiling" American Irish. and Bluegrass is American Irish.
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