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Old January 11th, 2012, 04:42 AM   #11
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I cannot exclude a misinterpretation, a misunderstanding of something real.

An hypothesis:

I would remember that before of the introduction of naval chronographs the calculation of the longitude after days and days of navigation [without the visual reference of a coast at the horizon] was quite impossible.

The estimates of the sailors can have put the same coast [of the same isle] at two different longitudes, so that some of these "ghost isles" perhaps were real isles put on the wrong place on the map because of mistakes of calculation of longitude by sailors.
Yes, could well be.
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Old January 11th, 2012, 02:02 PM   #12

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In 1380/90 the island was inhabited by people who seem to have been doing well enough (I wonder what the origin of these people was...?).

Then, roughly 200 years later, the island is reduced in size, and there is no report of any inhabitants (Or of any trace of there ever having been any inhabitants.).

So, where did the people go? Surely they would have attempted to escape to Scottland, Iceland, Ireland, or someplace, where they would have told the tale of there diminishing island, such that it would not have become "The land that time forgot.".

Of course, they may have tried to escape, but been swallowed by a storm or something.

Interesting post.
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Old January 11th, 2012, 03:05 PM   #13
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In 1380/90 the island was inhabited by people who seem to have been doing well enough (I wonder what the origin of these people was...?).

Then, roughly 200 years later, the island is reduced in size, and there is no report of any inhabitants (Or of any trace of there ever having been any inhabitants.).

So, where did the people go? Surely they would have attempted to escape to Scottland, Iceland, Ireland, or someplace, where they would have told the tale of there diminishing island, such that it would not have become "The land that time forgot.".

Of course, they may have tried to escape, but been swallowed by a storm or something.

Interesting post.
There are many tales and legends of disappearing islands all round the British coast.
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Old January 13th, 2012, 01:40 AM   #14
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Could it have actually been based on something real, I wonder?
Just an idea, it may be inspired or even based on the devastating loss of land in North Friesland in 1362 during [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grote_Mandrenke"]de Grote Mandrenke[/ame], the great downing of men. The trading city of [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rungholt"]Rungholt[/ame] was lost during this flood. Lots of myths arose from this incident, church bells heard ringing in the night and so on.

It was a sizable event, with the loss of 75% of the land and 25,000 lives. To see what the land looked like before this storm flood, the best map to use is Johannes Mejer's based on the description of King Valdemere II of Denmark's 'Earth Book'. You can see a comparison in Fig. 2 on page 8 here.

NB. Mejer's map shows Frisia Borealis as a number of islands which can be grouped into 3 main islands. Some scholars have identified these as Ptolemy's three 'Saxon Islands'. This is another puzzle about a contemporary reference to islands which do not exist on modern maps.

Last edited by authun; January 13th, 2012 at 01:51 AM.
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Old January 13th, 2012, 02:03 AM   #15
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Just an idea, it may be inspired or even based on the devastating loss of land in North Friesland in 1362 during de Grote Mandrenke, the great downing of men. The trading city of Rungholt was lost during this flood. Lots of myths arose from this incident, church bells heard ringing in the night and so on.

It was a sizable event, with the loss of 75% of the land and 25,000 lives. To see what the land looked like before this storm flood, the best map to use is Johannes Mejer's based on the description of King Valdemere II of Denmark's 'Earth Book'. You can see a comparison in Fig. 2 on page 8 here.

NB. Mejer's map shows Frisia Borealis as a number of islands which can be grouped into 3 main islands. Some scholars have identified these as Ptolemy's three 'Saxon Islands'. This is another puzzle about a contemporary reference to islands which do not exist on modern maps.
It might well have something to do with that, yes. No one, as far as I know, has explained why the name "Frisland" was used for this large island in the Atlantic.
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Old January 13th, 2012, 05:10 AM   #16

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According to Oera Lida , Who were a Matrarchal society, and were led by their eremodder , and the book says her name was Frya , so the name could have come from this , but there is also a theme running through the book , as i mentioned earlier , that all of the population of Frisland were free , they did not believe in either any conquered people , or foreign people living with them being made slaves , as may have been the case in other peoples they came across , and the name could also have come from this belief . have a read of the link for Atantis , Vinland which is basically about the same theme , it was your thread Nyneve , that reminded me i had it ,The third possibility from their language was that 'fr' meant free and 'is' was their name for ice (see the other thread) So it was the 'free from ice land ', but all speculation though i am afraid .

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Old January 13th, 2012, 06:54 AM   #17

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Very intriguing, I am going to look for that book in some libraries nearby
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Old January 13th, 2012, 07:22 AM   #18
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According to Oera Lida , Who were a Matrarchal society, and were led by their eremodder , and the book says her name was Frya , so the name could have come from this , but there is also a theme running through the book , as i mentioned earlier , that all of the population of Frisland were free , they did not believe in either any conquered people , or foreign people living with them being made slaves , as may have been the case in other peoples they came across , and the name could also have come from this belief . have a read of the link for Atantis , Vinland which is basically about the same theme , it was your thread Nyneve , that reminded me i had it ,The third possibility from their language was that 'fr' meant free and 'is' was their name for ice (see the other thread) So it was the 'free from ice land ', but all speculation though i am afraid .
Why would the Zeno brothers place Frisland way out in the north Atlantic, when it was really just Friesland?
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Old January 13th, 2012, 07:35 AM   #19

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A precedent: Martin Frobishen in 1576, following a map based on Mercatore projection [which extends lands and seas near to the pole] confused the coast of Greenland with Friesland ... and when he reached the Land of Baffin he thought he was Greenland ...
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Old January 13th, 2012, 07:37 AM   #20
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A precedent: Martin Frobishen in 1576, following a map based on Mercatore projection [which extends lands and seas near to the pole] confused the coast of Greenland with Friesland ... and when he reached the Land of Baffin he thought he was Greenland ...
He didn't confuse it with the actual Friesland in the Netherlands though, but with the supposed island of Frisland in the Atlantic.
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