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Old December 21st, 2012, 12:52 AM   #41

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Originally Posted by sturm View Post
I really like the monument with the flags.
By the way, i see that the graves have crosses but what if some of the soldiers were muslims? Bulgarian army did have considarable amount of muslims
Sturm, I guess that some Romanian soldiers might also have been Muslims or Jews but as I told you the graveyard was erected in 1920's. In those times the only religious sign in the military graveyards was the cross
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Old December 22nd, 2012, 05:24 AM   #42
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A British WWI veteran ended up regretting for the rest of his life the day he spared a German soldier's life. Because that soldier was Adolf Hitler...


I Spared Hitler's Life!


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Hitler during WWI


The First World War was in its last hours, millions of soldiers on both sides were dead and those who fought on knew the end was near, as did English Private Henry Tandey who served with the Duke of Wellington's Regiment.

In September of 1918, on the French battlefield of Marcoing, he won the Victoria Cross for bravery, one of many medals the 27 year old would win during the 'war to end all wars.' As the battle of Marcoing raged, Allied and German forces engaged in bitter hand to hand combat. The defining moment for Private Tandey and world history came when a wounded German limped directly into his line of fire.

"I took aim but couldn't shoot a wounded man," said Tandey, "so I let him go." Years later he discovered he had spared an Austrian Corporal named Adolf Hitler.

Hitler himself never forgot that pivotal moment or the man who had spared him. On becoming German Chancellor in 1933, he ordered his staff to track down Tandey's service records. They also managed to obtain a print of an Italian painting showing Tandey carrying a wounded Allied soldier on his back, which Hitler hung with pride on the wall at his mountain top retreat at Berchtesgaden. He showed the print to British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain during his historic visit in 1938 and explained its special significance.

The Führer seized that occasion to have his personal gratitude relayed to Tandey, which Chamberlain conveyed via telephone on his return to London from that most fateful trip.

Henry Tandey left military service before the start of World War II and worked as a security guard in Coventry. His "good deed" haunted him for the rest of his life, especially as Nazi bombers destroyed Coventry in 1940 and London burned day and night during the Blitz.

"If only I had known what he would turn out to be. When I saw all the people, woman and children, he had killed and wounded I was sorry to God I let him go," he said before his death in 1977 at age 86.

The History Place - Strange but True!
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Old January 5th, 2013, 10:19 AM   #43

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As I know this is the largest monument of WWI fallen soldiers in Romania:
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mateias mausoleum-Campulung

But it is, also, the one from marasesti:
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Old January 8th, 2013, 08:23 AM   #44

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An often forgotten war.

Its a big thing here tj. The 36th Ulster Division lost 3,000 men (some say 5,000) on the first day of the Somme and its commemorated bigtime every Ist of July.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 08:32 AM   #45
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A pic of my great grandfather training in the U.S. Army Air Service


Attached I think, is a picture of my great grandfather George C. King who thankfully was spared from the horrors of the war because it ended before he was sent over. He is on the left of this picture which was taken at Kelley Air Field near San Antonio, Texas where he was training in the Army Air Service in 1919 I think.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 09:52 AM   #46

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This might be a rather large project to suggest, but a site like this could attempt a WW1 100 years ago today thread. It would work for certain campaigns and battles at least, although there would be long periods of time with "All Quiet on the Western Front".
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Old January 8th, 2013, 01:41 PM   #47

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Two of Queen Victoria’s many grandchildren, King George V (front, third from right) and Kaiser Wilhelm II (at his right), pose in 1912 outside the mess of the Prussian Foot Guards in Berlin, surrounded by officers of the regiment. The king is on a visit to his cousin in Germany and, as was the custom, each monarch wears the uniform of one of the other’s regiments: George is in that of the Foot Guards; the kaiser in that of the British 1st Royal Dragoons. His grandmother had made Wilhelm colonel-in-chief of the regiment in 1894. He had really wanted to be made a field marshal but she felt that was a promotion too far, especially since he had already been made an admiral in the Royal Navy.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 02:18 PM   #48

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Both of my grand grandfathers fought in the war, in Austro - hungarian army. One was captured in Italy, other was captured by Russians and both were in imprisoned. The one from Italy survived, but after he came home he died from unknown disease. Another grand grandfather that was captured by Russians also survived prison and captivity, but came home in 1921. He learned german and russian perfectly, and after nazis occupied Yugoslavia, they took him as a translator. weird destiny.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 03:51 PM   #49

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My grandfather was one of the Old Contemptibles and fought on the Western Front from beginning to end. It was from him that I got a love and fascination for the Great War although I soon realized when studying the subject how awful it actually was. He was in the artillery and cared greatly for the horses. Ironically he had a higher opinion of the German soldier than the French whose people, he said, disliked the British. He saw his brother blown to pieces just several yards from him in battle and, later, almost lost a leg himself but insisted, against the surgeons advice to amputate, that the shattered limb remain intact and it would eventually heal. He was right. Often, with a note of sadness, he would talk about how easy it was towards the end of the war for the Tommy to take pot shots at the German trenches where fresh soldiers, really boys, with much curiosity but little training would pop their heads over the parapet to see the enemy only to be killed instantly by a British sharpshooter. Must have preyed on the mind of many a veteran after the war. In 1919 he was part of the British Army of Occupation of the Rhine and had his battery trained on Cologne Catherdral in case the local people became hostile. Thankfully it survived my grandfather and the RAF and the USAAF in WWII because it is now one of my favourite places to visit whenever I travel to Germany.
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Old January 9th, 2013, 03:04 PM   #50

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Originally Posted by BRIAN GOWER View Post
My grandfather was one of the Old Contemptibles and fought on the Western Front from beginning to end. It was from him that I got a love and fascination for the Great War although I soon realized when studying the subject how awful it actually was. He was in the artillery and cared greatly for the horses. Ironically he had a higher opinion of the German soldier than the French whose people, he said, disliked the British. He saw his brother blown to pieces just several yards from him in battle and, later, almost lost a leg himself but insisted, against the surgeons advice to amputate, that the shattered limb remain intact and it would eventually heal. He was right. Often, with a note of sadness, he would talk about how easy it was towards the end of the war for the Tommy to take pot shots at the German trenches where fresh soldiers, really boys, with much curiosity but little training would pop their heads over the parapet to see the enemy only to be killed instantly by a British sharpshooter. Must have preyed on the mind of many a veteran after the war. In 1919 he was part of the British Army of Occupation of the Rhine and had his battery trained on Cologne Catherdral in case the local people became hostile. Thankfully it survived my grandfather and the RAF and the USAAF in WWII because it is now one of my favourite places to visit whenever I travel to Germany.

Wow, incredible insight into this horrific episode. In contrast some soldiers lost their lives going to the front lines and never even saw a German.
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