Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > European History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

European History European History Forum - Western and Eastern Europe including the British Isles, Scandinavia, Russia


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old May 17th, 2012, 07:18 AM   #1

Young Guard's Avatar
Lecturer
 
Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 282
William the conquer funeral


Is it true that William the conquer's body fell out of the coffin? Is it true that his body exploded and caused a terrible smell? Is it true that in his funeral there was a fire?
Young Guard is offline  
Remove Ads
Old May 18th, 2012, 03:05 PM   #2

Nemowork's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: South of the barcodes
Posts: 4,463

Since theres nobody alive who was there then (except maybe Black dog) then your going to have to accept the sources.

and yes the stories do say that his body was basically so rotten and swollen that it exploded during the funeral.

I dont know if its really true but as a northern 'we set fire to your bishop' national i kind of hope it is!
Nemowork is online now  
Old May 19th, 2012, 03:30 AM   #3

Crystal Rainbow's Avatar
The Good Knight
 
Joined: Feb 2011
From: Cumbernauld Scotland
Posts: 9,896
Blog Entries: 50

I must admit I find his death very interesting. In his later years he had become rather fat and king Philip of France had described him as looking like a pregnant women. William did not kindly take to this insult and he was furious. So he had decided to attack the kings territory at Mantes and set it on fire on the 15th of August 1087. Soon after this happen he fell of his horse and suffered internal injuries. He was taken to the priory of St Gervase and when he knew his end was near he instructed that William Rufus to become king of England. He had made his peace by giving his wealth to the poor and the Church and all his prisoners to be released. William died on the 9th of September 1087 and it seemed that everybody at his bedside had left him to attend to their own affairs. When everyone had finally got around to arranging a state funeral and building a tomb for him his corpse could not fit into the tomb. The attendants had to force his body into the tomb and the body had burst and a most disgusting odour had spread about the church.
It seems in history that his bones have never rested in peace as his tombs have been destroyed by the revolutions in history and when last been disturbed in the French revolution when there was only a thigh bone was known to survive.
Crystal Rainbow is offline  
Old June 12th, 2012, 12:27 PM   #4

Uhtred's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jun 2012
From: England
Posts: 188

After the obese duke William died (in agony after his internal rupture during his fall at Mantes), 'loyal' retainers fled and abandoned his near-naked and robbed corpse on the floor to secure their own lands.

Only the hardiest of holy men stayed to bury William. But the coffin was too small and, trying to cram him into it, the duke's corpse burst open, effusing foul smells.
Finally, under heavy incense, the old duke was buried.
Uhtred is offline  
Old June 12th, 2012, 04:33 PM   #5

Crystal Rainbow's Avatar
The Good Knight
 
Joined: Feb 2011
From: Cumbernauld Scotland
Posts: 9,896
Blog Entries: 50

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uhtred View Post
After the obese duke William died (in agony after his internal rupture during his fall at Mantes), 'loyal' retainers fled and abandoned his near-naked and robbed corpse on the floor to secure their own lands.

Only the hardiest of holy men stayed to bury William. But the coffin was too small and, trying to cram him into it, the duke's corpse burst open, effusing foul smells.
Finally, under heavy incense, the old duke was buried.
It was not the most grandest of funerals to be remembered. Nobody was much bothered about him, and they were looking out for what lands they could get.
Crystal Rainbow is offline  
Old June 12th, 2012, 09:27 PM   #6
Historian
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,094

He wasn't that popular with most of his subject due mainly to being seen as a foreign invader, so some of the stories may reflect this and medieval ideas about signs from God and so on.
betgo is online now  
Old June 13th, 2012, 12:32 AM   #7

Uhtred's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jun 2012
From: England
Posts: 188

Quote:
Originally Posted by betgo View Post
He wasn't that popular with most of his subject due mainly to being seen as a foreign invader, so some of the stories may reflect this and medieval ideas about signs from God and so on.
That's right, Anglo-Saxon folk memory condemns him as a foreign suppressor in a way that we don't Canute - who was even bloodier when he first reigned.
Uhtred is offline  
Old June 13th, 2012, 07:26 AM   #8
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Bolton, UK
Posts: 1,749

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uhtred View Post
That's right, Anglo-Saxon folk memory condemns him as a foreign suppressor in a way that we don't Canute - who was even bloodier when he first reigned.
That's rubbish.

William the Bastard was MUCH bloodier and oppressive that Canute. Canute held this power-base together by uniting Danes and Englishmen under cultural bonds of wealth and custom, rather than sheer brutality.

Not once did Canute commit genocide on the scale of William's "Harrying of the North," during which William's men committed a scorched earth policy which laid to waste and left depopulated huge swathes of Northern England and left 100,000 people dead.
Brunel is offline  
Old June 13th, 2012, 07:32 AM   #9
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Bolton, UK
Posts: 1,749

William the Bastard died fighting the French in 1087 (he didn't like the French much).

In about the beginning of 1087, William married his daughter Constance to Alan Fergant, the Count of Brittany, in furtherance of his policy of seeking allies against the French kings.

William's son Robert, still allied with the French King Philip I, appears to have been active in stirring up trouble, enough so that William led an expedition against the French Vexin in July 1087. While seizing Mantes, William either fell ill or was injured by the pommel of his saddle. He was taken to Rouen and the priory of St Gervase near the city, where he died on 9 September 1087.

The funeral, attended by the bishops and abbots of Normandy as well as his son Henry, was disturbed by the assertion of a citizen of Caen who alleged that his family had been illegally despoiled of the land on which the church was built. After hurried consultations the allegation was shown to be true, and the man was compensated. A further indignity occurred when the corpse was lowered into the tomb. The corpse was too large for the space, and when attendants forced the body into the tomb it burst, spreading a disgusting odour throughout the church.

His tomb has been disturbed many time sover the centuries, including being destroyed during the French Revolution.

William the Conqueror - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Brunel is offline  
Old June 13th, 2012, 11:40 AM   #10

Grenadier's Avatar
Academician
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 63

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uhtred View Post
That's right, Anglo-Saxon folk memory condemns him as a foreign suppressor in a way that we don't Canute - who was even bloodier when he first reigned.
William's death did not stop Norman rule though.

The descendants of the invaders ruled the upper classes of England entirely for the next few hundred years am I right?
Grenadier is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > European History

Tags
conquer, funeral, william


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pericles' Funeral Oration Fire_Fingers Ancient History 10 December 10th, 2009 05:35 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.