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Old November 13th, 2012, 05:01 AM   #11
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Thank you anyone who answered my questions and special thanks to Toomtabard.

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But wage rates were much lower: I was a third year trade apprentice in 1960 and for a 46 hour week I was paid around 7 per week net of income tax and National insurance. (About 15 pence per hour)

So, as soon as I understand, you received only 28 pounds per month. Did National insurance include NHS tax?
How much did you spend for food?
How much money average british family spent on food?
How much money left after buying food, paying for water, electricity , municipal taxes?
What british people ate in the morning, in the afternoon and in the evening?

On the picture in my first post prices are in pennies and pounds but it is not clear from the text whether these pennies are decimal one ( 100p = 1 pound ) or traditional ( 240 pennies = 20 shillings = 1 pound )?
Although they probably converted prices into modern pennies - it follows from:

Quote:
''Senior Service '' cigarettes , which I smoked back then (I loathe smoking now) cost two shillings for ten out of a street cigarette machine(two shillings =10 pence in modern money-today those self same cigarettes would cost around three pounds (3) for ten.
But anyway I want to be sure.
What was the price of one pound of meat, one pound of butter, one loaf of bread?

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'No coloureds'' signs were legal in job and housing advertisements and the majority of working class kids in 1960 still left school at age 15 to get a job -many of them intellectually bright but unable to go to university. Although that would change to some extent in 1963 with the Robbins Report which recommended that positive steps be tasken to make it easier for working class people to go to university therough a system of grants which were absurdly generous by modern standards because they were not loans that had to be repaid like today's British students have to sign up for.
How big were tuitions fees before Robbins report and after? Were tuitions fees uniform among colleges and universities? Had you had scholarship?

Quote:
Most people tried to get a rented council house..
Who was eligible for such house and how people paid for rent?

Quote:
Most houses in the 60s were heated by open coal fires
What is open coal fire? Is this something like this
Fireplace Fireplace
?
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Old November 13th, 2012, 06:05 AM   #12

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I can't remember the price of meat, chicken would have been dear compared to today, spam and corned beef were cheap.

Spam Spam

Chips were 4d (old money) a piece of Cod 1 shilling circa 1962 from memory, about 1 and 5 now.

Fish_and_chips Fish_and_chips

By the end of the 60s Chinese takeaways were challenging the traditional fish and chips
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Old November 13th, 2012, 06:44 AM   #13
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Quote:
spam and corned beef were cheap.
What was the price and weight of package of slam and corned beef?
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Old November 13th, 2012, 07:08 AM   #14

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Originally Posted by ddd_new View Post
What was the price and weight of package of slam and corned beef?
I used to buy both in quarter of a pound at the butchers from memory, I would think the cans were the same weight.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...g-shelves.html

Green Shield Stamps, I had forgotten those, you saved them up and then exchanged them for consumer goods.

Green_Shield_Stamps Green_Shield_Stamps
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Old November 13th, 2012, 07:20 AM   #15

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"I remember that 2 bought a whole weeks shopping from the local corner store for a family of five."

"petrol 2/6d a gallon."

"Bread was 1/2d for a large loaf" (Canadian wheat mostly)

BBC NEWS | UK | Magazine | Your 1960s: Shopping
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Old November 13th, 2012, 07:33 AM   #16
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Quote:
Chips were 4d (old money) a piece of Cod 1 shilling
What is 4d, is this 4 pennies?

How large was piece of Cod?

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I used to buy both in quarter of a pound at the butchers from memory, I would think the cans were the same weight.
Sorry, but I do not understand.
Does word pound refer to weight or to cost?
If this refers to weight, then whet was the price of one package and conversely.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 08:03 AM   #17

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddd_new View Post
What is 4d, is this 4 pennies?

How large was piece of Cod?



Sorry, but I do not understand.
Does word pound refer to weight or to cost?
If this refers to weight, then whet was the price of one package and conversely.
4d (240d to 1)... 4p (100p to 1) 60s prices will be in s d (12d = 1 shilling)

weight yes, 1/4 lbs, I don't remember the price, the wife might, I'll ask her when she comes in.

A large piece of Cod would hang over the edge of a standard dinner plate.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 09:23 AM   #18

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddd_new View Post
I would expect most of your questions could be answered anecdotally, there's plenty of Brits on this forum who are over 30 years old.

I told you so. Unfortunately, I wasn't born until 1962, so I'm learning something as well!!
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Old November 13th, 2012, 09:43 AM   #19
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OccamsRazor, What I am intersted is whether pennies on this picture

Click the image to open in full size.

are old pennies ( 240 pennies = 1 pound ) or a metrice ones ( 100 pennies = 1 pound).

Last edited by ddd_new; November 13th, 2012 at 10:13 AM.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 10:04 AM   #20

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddd_new View Post
OccamsRazor, What I am intersted is whether pennies on this picture Click the image to open in full size.

are old pennies ( 240 pennies = 1 pound ) or a metrice ones ( 100 pennies = 1 pound).
What is in your table is decimal currency (metric, as you call it).
Decimal coinage was introduced in 1971.

Before 1971 the coinage was (pounds) s (shillings) d (pence)
After decimalisation in 1971 it was (pounds) p (pence)

So -
11 (or 11.00) is eleven pounds.
1.11 is one pound and eleven pence.
11p is eleven pence.

Hope this helps.
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