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Old November 13th, 2012, 09:52 AM   #21

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Originally Posted by Haesten View Post
I can't remember the price of meat, chicken would have been dear compared to today, spam and corned beef were cheap.

Spam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chips were 4d (old money) a piece of Cod 1 shilling circa 1962 from memory, about 1 and 5 now.

Fish and chips - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

By the end of the 60s Chinese takeaways were challenging the traditional fish and chips
Spot on!
A piece of cod and fourpenn'th of chips! Pieces of cod would be 10d, 1s/. or 1/6d ( 4p, 5p, 7.5p), so a modest take away meal would be about 5.8p.
If you were hard up for cash, Rock Salmon (baby shark/dogfish) or skate was available at a cheaper price.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 10:57 AM   #22
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Anyway, I think that in this table are old pennies.
Here is a citation :
Quote:
an old Standard Vanguard (costing 12.10s ) petrol 2/6d a gallon.
BBC NEWS | UK | Magazine | Your 1960s: Shopping

So the cost of patroleum was 30 pennies for 1 gallon ( near 4 litres ) and on pictuure we see price of 5 pennies for 1 litre. Infaltion in 60s was not very high - only 40% per decade and it is not clear about which year the author writes about - it may be the middle or the the end of the sixties . So by the author of cited text petroleum cost was 8 pennies.
But if we take price og one litre of petroleum as 0.05 pound then 1 gallon would cost 0.2 pounds and this is 4 shillings.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 10:59 AM   #23
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Pieces of cod

What was the weight of piece of cod for 10 pennies?
And what was the price of 1 kg ( 1 pound ) of rock salmon?

Last edited by ddd_new; November 13th, 2012 at 11:09 AM.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 11:49 AM   #24

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Originally Posted by ddd_new View Post
Anyway, I think that in this table are old pennies.
Here is a citation :

BBC NEWS | UK | Magazine | Your 1960s: Shopping

So the cost of patroleum was 30 pennies for 1 gallon ( near 4 litres ) and on pictuure we see price of 5 pennies for 1 litre. Infaltion in 60s was not very high - only 40% per decade and it is not clear about which year the author writes about - it may be the middle or the the end of the sixties . So by the author of cited text petroleum cost was 8 pennies.
But if we take price og one litre of petroleum as 0.05 pound then 1 gallon would cost 0.2 pounds and this is 4 shillings.
A UK gallon is 4.54 litres ( the Americans use the ancient Queen Anne gallon) Two shillings and sixpence (or half a crown) per gallon, equates with 12.5p per gallon or 2.75p/litre, however this is an error,petrol has not been that cheap since before WW2. Between 1960 and 1966 the price for what we used to call 98 octane or 4 star, rose from 4s/8d per gall. to 5/s 8d per gall moder equivalent 5.3p/litre to 6.24p/litre.(*AA figures)
I remember that around 1968 a gallon of 3 star cost the same as a 45RPM single record--6s/8d or 33.3p.

QUOTE=ddd_new;1256158] Pieces of cod

What was the weight of piece of cod for 10 pennies?
And what was the price of 1 kg ( 1 pound ) of rock salmon?[/QUOTE]

WEIGHT? There was a big piece, a medium piece and a small piece. You trusted the fishmonger in those days.
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Old November 14th, 2012, 12:00 AM   #25
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Quote:
There was a big piece, a medium piece and a small piece.
How big was a medium piece , small piece and big piece?
How much people paid for these pieces?
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Old November 14th, 2012, 01:32 AM   #26
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And ( I hope last ) question :
One man here writes about sixties:

Quote:
Great times - my wage was 11 per week - mortgage 11 per month - 5 per week housekeeping, leaving 9 per month for bills etc
What he mean by housekeeping? Is this municipal taxex, water, coal , electricity bills?
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Old November 14th, 2012, 08:14 AM   #27

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddd_new View Post
What he mean by housekeeping? Is this municipal taxex, water, coal , electricity bills?
No, that is 'bills' (quoted at 9 a month).

Housekeeping is more general expenses, food, clothes, consumables (cleaning products etc).
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Old November 14th, 2012, 08:35 AM   #28
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But this does not make sense : mortgage 11 per month and housekeeping 20 per month.
And what is the more general expenses?
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Old November 14th, 2012, 07:26 PM   #29
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DD NEW-Note also that the farthing=one quster of an old penny ceased to be legal tender in 1960.
The farthing was a small copper coin with the Queen's head on one side and the Wren bird on the other. When it was abolished in 1960 it was only used in Scotland by bakers who might charge a price including a farthing.
4 farthings equalled one old penny.
Re your other questions.-National Insurance was deducted by employers separately from weekly wages /monthly salaries Income Tax and National Isurance revenues were used to pay for universal free health care in troduced in Great Britain in 1948 and for benefits like unemployemnt pay and Old Age pensions.Income Tax was quite separate from N.I. .
Tuition fees for university in 1960 were 90 for the actual teaching fee which was a token figure as the Governement through tax funded payments supported paid for universities.
Yes I received a scholarship which covered part of my living expenses and expenses in going to university.
But my first scholarship was to attend full time a residential Adult education college for a year where Istudied Franch language literature and history and English language and literature for university entrance.Ihad already passed British andEuropean history A-level by evening class study before going as a full time student to the Adult Education college.
But I had to work all my college vacations in jobs on building sites and breweries to make money to tide me over at term times.
To the poster who asked about a seperate edition of Winston Churchill's ''American Civil War'' Yes it was published in hardback in early 1961 by London publisher Cassells priced ten shillings =50 pence, in modern money.I bought my copy with a lovely, crisp, red, ten shilling note from a bookseller in Edinburgh's Princes Street.
The dustjacket featured a famous photograph of George Armstrong Custer sitting on a tree stump with a captured Confederate officer who had been a classmate of Custer's at West Point military Academy, pre- 1861.
I was a baker in 1960 so Iam wel placed to help you with food prices in 1960.
For example, for a guinea =21 shilings=1-one shilling old money bakers in Scotland sold Xmas & New Year boxes containing -A-One cake of shortbread-B-A sweet Scottish delicacy called ''Black Bun'' C-6 Xmas pies (Pastry filled with mincemeat D-Petticoat tails shortbread.- one circular round.
On New Year's day in Scotland in 1960 it was traditional for Scottish working class families to feast on a large steak pie one of which would feed five people.This would cost Ten shillings in 1960==50 pence modern from a local baker.
In 1960 there was also a British coin called a ''Florin'' which was worth two shillings and a half crown which was worth two shillings and sixpence-12 and and one half pence modern- (8x half crowns=one pound)
The half crown was abolished on January 31st 1969-guineas or 21 shilings were abolished in the 1960's although no such coin existed in 20th century Britain.
Guineas were used as a racket by shopkeepers in 1960 to disguise the real price of goods.
For example, most furniture shops would sell a suite of furniture for 50 guineas which meant its real cost was 54 and 12 shillngs not just 50 so it was conning shoppers into thinking that the price was cheaper than it actually was.
I recall I had a three piece lounge suit made in 1964 to measure -the price the tailor quoted was fifteen guineas i.e. in reality 15 AND fifteen shillings NOT just 15.
Note there is still-TODAY- a classic horse race in England called ''THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS..'' WHICH WAS THE ORIGINAL 18TH /19 THE CENTURY PRIZE MONEY SUM PAID TO THE HORESOWNER WHO WON THE RACE.
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Old November 15th, 2012, 12:34 AM   #30

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Originally Posted by Toomtabard View Post
Guineas were used as a racket by shopkeepers in 1960 to disguise the real price of goods.
For example, most furniture shops would sell a suite of furniture for 50 guineas which meant its real cost was 54 and 12 shillngs not just 50 so it was conning shoppers into thinking that the price was cheaper than it actually was.
I recall I had a three piece lounge suit made in 1964 to measure -the price the tailor quoted was fifteen guineas i.e. in reality 15 AND fifteen shillings NOT just 15.
Note there is still-TODAY- a classic horse race in England called ''THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS..'' WHICH WAS THE ORIGINAL 18TH /19 THE CENTURY PRIZE MONEY SUM PAID TO THE HORESOWNER WHO WON THE RACE.
While you are probably right about the use of Guineas in the mid-20th, that was not the original use and purpose. When the gold coin was first struck in the 17th C it was equivalent to a pound--20 shillings, but as the price of gold increased ( ie. the actual currency devalued), it was soon worth 22 shillings. By the time that currency had settled down in the 18thC the Guinea was worth 21 shillings and the shillings were used by a variety of enterprises as sales commission. So you bought a horse at auction for 50 Guineas, the seller got 50 and the Auctioneer got the 50 shillings as commission. Likewise if someone sold a property, the agent's fee was the shilling component ( 5%) of Guinea price. In the 18thC a huge amount of business and enterprise was based of "referral fees" or "finder's fees" or small-service fees. If you were Beau Brummel ( or even Beau Bummel) and you ordered your suit from Saville Row, the man who measured you up, rushed around with the fittings and collected the cash was rarely the tailor, but the front man. The shilling component of Brummel's bill was his fee/commission.
As for the 1000 guineas horse race, the 1000 shillings of the prize money went to the jockey, the trainer and the stablehands and the 1000 pounds to the owner.
When so many worked for just 5% commission, prices were pretty stable.
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